Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Unread 12-25-2009, 01:30 PM   #1
rtbrick
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 38
Scraping up old tile from a slab floor

It's been just a while since I've pestered the forums for advice. I'm trying to rallying the team (well, just me) to remodel my master bath. Nothing too crazy: tile the one-person size shower, which is just an insert right now; replace tile surrounding the tub; then some usual stuff like counters and fixtures etc. Maybe the vanity.

Here is my number one problem with getting started: the white tile that was laid down on the concrete slab is super difficult to remove. I mean, Superman would have a hard time getting all the residual thinset up. The tiles will come off well enough, but it seems that the majority of the thinset stays stuck to the slab floor. I removed roughly the same amount of tile (~10x10 worth and the same kind) from the entry area of my house during the last round of postings here. I ended up using a demolition hammer to pick and gouge the thinset off. Made a terrible mess of the house, and of the floor. I laid engineered hardwood over that area AFTER I refilled all the chunked/damaged areas. Ended up being fine, but man was that hard. Is there an easier way? Here's a dumb question: Would a multitool like my new Rockwell (like the Fein) make this task any easier? I would have already completed this project if not for dreading the tile removal.

-Rob
rtbrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Unread 12-25-2009, 02:15 PM   #2
silvercitytile
Registered User
 
silvercitytile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: silver city
Posts: 5,973
Send a message via MSN to silvercitytile
hey rob i dont think the fien tool will do the job. how about once u get most of the big cunks off, use some self leveler. it'll be alot easyer tham trying to scrap all of it
__________________
jeff aka papi chulo. "I'll make you famous!"(William H. Bonney aka Billy The Kid)

Schluter Kerdi and Ditra installer in Southern New Mexico
Castillo Construction
silvercitytile is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-25-2009, 02:18 PM   #3
Mountain Tile
Pashley Tile
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Allentown Pa
Posts: 3,086
It's not fun tearing out tile, you just have to fight through it, although I have not tried the fein, great reports of it on here, definitely worth a try. I use a small chipping hammer with a chisel bit, works well for me. good luck.
__________________
Chuck












wwwpashleytile.com
Mountain Tile is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-25-2009, 05:31 PM   #4
TechHead
Tile nub
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Apple Valley MN
Posts: 113
Would something like this work? It's on Ebay, cant link it though, also saw a 4.5"model.

5" CUP WHEEL FOR PAINT REMOVAL FITS ANGLE GRINDER
5" PROFESSIONAL GRADE TRUELINETM CYCLONE SERIES FOR SMOOTHING ROUGH OR PATCHED FLOORS AND FEATHERING UNEVEN JOINTS, HIGH SPOTS, BRIDGE DECKS OR SLAB PANELS. REMOVES PAINT, HARD EPOXIES, MASTICS, URETHANE AND OTHER COATINGS OR TOPPINGS.

SEGMENT HEIGHT = .250 (1/4")

ARBOR: 5/8"-7/8"
__________________
Forrest
TechHead is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-25-2009, 05:41 PM   #5
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 32,444
A cup wheel would grind down the thinset but will make a real mess of the house, probably worse than the chipping hammer did in his entry. Of course you can hang plastic in the doorways and block off the return air vents.

I do think a cup wheel is a good idea to just hit the high spots and get a fairly flat surface before filling the low spots like Jeff mentioned. If the thinset is soft enough you can knock down the high spots with a rub stone. Sounds like it may be too hard though.

After filling the floor, the rubstone is good to knock down any ridges left behind from the trowel.

It's too much of a job for a Fein tool
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-25-2009, 05:45 PM   #6
ktgforce1
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Lakes Region, NH
Posts: 13
thinset removal

I've had luck removing thin-set from substrates using a Bosch "Bulldog" hammer drill and a 2" wide scraping chisel. If that is not available, a relatively inexpensive alternative is a "spyder" attachment which goes on your reciprocating saw. it's just a 4" wide blade that scrapes well. I've used it on wood substrates and it can be a bit jerky, but it def works. watch out for kick back. http://www.spyderscraper.com/
__________________
Kris
ktgforce1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-25-2009, 06:11 PM   #7
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 32,444
I have this attachment for my Makita power scraper (which is a small chipping hammer). This will hold a blade that does fairly well to get thinset up.
http://www.amazon.com/MAKITA-Scraper.../dp/B00080FDBS
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-25-2009, 08:48 PM   #8
barlow46
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Edgewater, FL
Posts: 50
Is there any reason (other than the height being raised) that a person couldn't burn in some thinset over the old hard to remove thinset and then when it dries, lay new tile over your burn in? It seems that if the old thinset is that hard to remove, it would be ok for a base of new thinset. No experience here so don't hit me too hard on my response.
__________________
Barlow
East Coast Florida
barlow46 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-25-2009, 09:20 PM   #9
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 32,444
Yeah, that's what we were talking about in post 2 and 5. It helps to knock off the high spots first though.
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-26-2009, 10:31 AM   #10
rtbrick
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 38
Yeah, I tried the cup. Sent dust all over the house! I may just have to chip a away as I can, but it is so difficult that it will easily add a week or more to the project. That's what stinks. Chip some, get frustrated, walk away. Do over again until tile and thinset is gone. I will consider knocking down the thinset until I can fill/level, but with being on a slab that may raise my floor a tad too much. I'll definately give some of the tools and attachemtns a try - out of desperation if nothing else!
rtbrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-26-2009, 11:47 AM   #11
johnfrwhipple
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 700
Chipping up thinset

You should be able to find a 2" chipping bladed for your demo hammer.

If you hold the demo hammer at 30 degrees and move in 4"-6" sections and just soldier on.

The trick is to have cold beer waiting on a complete job and lots of music. I have the radio headphones for jobs and days like those.

Get out the tunes and just bang it out.

You should be able to clean up about 9 square feet every 10-30 minutes.

Good luck.

Last edited by johnfrwhipple; 02-19-2010 at 09:00 PM.
johnfrwhipple is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-26-2009, 12:36 PM   #12
Daveco2
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 28
I agree with John, a cheap rotary hammer drill from Harbor Freight ($65.00) and a good chipping blade from Home Depot ($20.00). It's all in the music you pick. Phone or Ipod with good tunes (priceless)

This was mastic instead of thinset so it was easier but I'm sure it will work

Name:  before.jpg
Views: 1412
Size:  62.8 KB
Before

Name:  big junks gone.jpg
Views: 1409
Size:  48.5 KB
Big junks gone

Name:  scraped and cleaned.jpg
Views: 1330
Size:  37.8 KB
scraped and cleaned

Good luck!

Dave
__________________
Dave
Daveco2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 12-26-2009, 04:08 PM   #13
rtbrick
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 38
Might be the best route to purchase the HF hammer and get to work. Though, I have some flash backs from the last project. Nothing a little counseling won't cure. I have another small bathroom to deal with first. I'll start a post for that one looking more to design, but it has a vinyl rug to contend with. Believe my only option there is to put down a better rug. Second floor with carpet in the hall means the installed tile would be too high. Anyway, the vinyl I removed from my kitchen was strongly glued over evey square inch! I expect the one in the bathrom is as well. Gonna be a tough DIY year....
__________________
Rob
rtbrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cutback-Ready to give up scraping waj Tile Forum/Advice Board 19 12-12-2012 02:33 PM
Is Scraping Urethane Glue Off Slab Good Enough or Scarify? NotaTiler Tile Forum/Advice Board 3 11-25-2009 09:45 PM
Grout in textured tile crevices - can I dye instead of scraping? bekahroo Cleaning, Restoration and Sealing 4 10-25-2008 11:11 PM
scraping grount haze with arazor blade zsazsa Cleaning, Restoration and Sealing 2 06-11-2005 12:34 PM
Scraping thinset for days nearmain Tile Forum/Advice Board 7 09-01-2002 10:28 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:34 AM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018 John Bridge & Associates, LLC