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Unread 01-28-2006, 08:31 PM   #1
TonyCanou
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Husky Wet Tile Saw

I saw a Husky THD-950 wet tile saw at home depot. It comes with a stand and cuts something like 20" straight cuts and 14" diagonal (i may be an inch or so off, but it's a much higher number than the average $300 saw). Anybody have any experience with this saw? If so, is it good quality? It sounds like a good deal.

There's also a QEP for roughly the same price. How's QEP's quality at that price range?

Thanks.
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Unread 01-28-2006, 08:34 PM   #2
Jason_Butler
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Not familiar with the Husky saw. The QEP brand has been at Home Repo for awhile. Those saws would work fine for a homeowner that uses it ocassionally. I wouldn't trust one for constant use though.

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Unread 01-28-2006, 11:34 PM   #3
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We have one of the Husky saws for condo and apt work. Like it so far. Just had the bearings go out on one of yellow table saws from HD. We got about 6 months out of it. I find the more and more the guys like the little saws and they try and cut to much of the large tile and they just are not up to a lot of the large, hard tile.
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Unread 01-29-2006, 08:38 AM   #4
hitechguy
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What is considered "large" tile and "hard" tile? I'm doing a bathroom with 12x12 porcelin with some future wall projects. I've looked at the husky and have been wondering about it too. I like the way the frame etc. is put together as all the pieces are bolted so you can shim etc. if accuracy is out of whack.
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Unread 01-29-2006, 08:47 AM   #5
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Hi Tony. Hi HI-Tech, Give us a first name, will ya?

Jerry is talking about day-to-day production cutting, and it takes a good quality saw to keep up with that. I'm not famiar with the Husky, but it will probably work fine for a weekend warrior who is not planning on going into the tile business.
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Unread 01-29-2006, 11:52 AM   #6
rjkritzer
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Bought and assembled one today

I just bought and assembled the Husky tile saw from HD for $297 plus tax (I have not used it yet, but will update this post in a few days after I get started).

It is the type of saw where the blade is fixed and the tile/table slides into the blade. It comes with a stand and has a laser for alignment. You will need to supply two AAA batteries for the laser (for me that means another trip to the store). The total assembly time was about 40 minutes.

So far, I am very impressed with the saw. When compared to a "professional" saw that I rented a couple of months ago, I would say the Husky is just slightly less robust. It seems like it will be ideal for occasional use by a homeowner doing a few projects here and there. I would think in the long run, a professional would prefer a more robust saw since eventually something will wear or break faster on the Husky. To save cost, I expect that the Husky is built with some cheaper components/bearings/gears/etc that are not apparent on the surface.

I bought this one because the rental cost is $90/day, and I do not like to rush with my projects. I am doing a powder room now with marble and expect some delays in due to the pattern that I am using. I needed a saw that would allow for diagonal cuts on 12" tiles. This one will cut diagonals on 16" tiles, which is more than all other sub $300 saws that I found. For me, this saw will be way more than adequate. Side note: If someone in the Philadelphia area wants to buy mine when I finish, just let me know. The use from my project will be very slight, so maybe a price of $200 would be a good deal for each of us. Sorry to the board if offering a saw for sale is tacky - it is just an offer for someone who would rather not spend the full price of a new one. I really do not have a big agenda to make a sale.

Reviewing quickly, I was impressed with the overall quality of the design. The stand is durable tubing (slightly less durable than the welded "L" brackets on the professional models). The tub is rugged plastic. The motor and blade bracket is a solid cast part that bolts to the frame of tray. The table rides smoothly on the rails of the frame, creating a pretty sure alignment between the blade and sliding table. Overall, it is a nice design, easy to assemble, and included all tools. In my opinion it is a good deal.
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Unread 01-29-2006, 12:03 PM   #7
opiethetileman
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i Have one got it when it came out. Its like the MK 370 470. its ok I use it for walls 4x4 and 6 and 6x10 and sucks. Also it is my paver saw sunshine pavers. its okay for the money. But i go back the big ole brute the superior xl all the tile. I have XL's set up rite now in the resturant I have them sitting in kiddie pools so I have plenty of water.
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Unread 01-29-2006, 03:49 PM   #8
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Opie
the kiddie pools are great. We use them all the time. In the winter when you want to set up in the garage and working on the 20th floor of a highrise.
There are two back by the garage blowing around in the wind now.
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Unread 01-29-2006, 03:56 PM   #9
rjkritzer
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update on new husky

Well, I could not wait any longer so I decided to cut some marble on my new Husky wet saw. Compared to the professional model I rented recently, the Husky is somewhat rougher. The professional saw cut through ceramic like a hot knife through butter, the Husky is more like a cool knife through butter. I found it to be louder, coarser and occasionally the sliding tray seemed to grab and require of bit of a push to get it moving. On a scale of 1 to 10 the professional was a 10 and this is about a 6 - 7. It is not horrible, and will do my job just fine, but not as smoothly as hoped.

On the other job I did using the rented saw, I was cutting 12" ceramic tiles, now I am cutting 12" marble - that may make some difference - I don't know.

That's my 2 cents.

Bob
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Unread 01-29-2006, 07:03 PM   #10
TonyCanou
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to rjkritzer (and everyone else),

thanks for the info. I wonder if the slow cutting issue is because of the blade as opposed to the saw. I believe you usually you get an inexpensive blade with the saw at that price range. I think they have special blades for cutting marble.

thoughts anyone?
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Unread 02-20-2006, 03:55 PM   #11
rjkritzer
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Laser guide may help with safety

Just finished cutting and laying the marble for my small project, and used the Husky saw as mentioned above. Overall, I think the saw is well worth the $300 for light duty work.

One thing that I thought I would add here is that I really liked the laser guide on the saw for aligning the cuts, but just as importantly, I used it for safety. I did a boat-load of diagonal cuts on small pieces, cut narrow strips, and also cut out a toilet flange and I had one golden rule - "never let the laser light cross over my hands or fingers". It worked, I still have all my fingers.

For a pro, safe operation probably comes naturally, but for me as a beginner, I found this allowed me to be more safe while focusing on the work.

Bob
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Unread 02-20-2006, 04:05 PM   #12
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The Husky THD-950 is a new version of the Workforce THD-850. Both names are HD store brands and could the "THD" stand for "The Home Depot"?

They are both grinder-motor type saws. The newer one is a bit bigger for larger tiles. It also has an outward bend it the motor support arm to increase the distance between the arm and the blade.

Grinder-type saws tend to be very loud. They don't develop as much torque for the horsepower as saws with larger motors. And unless you speak fluent Chinese, I wouldn't count on being able to track down replacement parts.

Bob --

I'm not looking for a saw, but I'm in Cherry Hill. Where are you?
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Unread 05-20-2006, 12:53 PM   #13
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an update - fwiw.

Picked up the 950 to finish the shower and floor job. HD gave me a $35 "rebate" so that helped. Yes, it's noisy - have to wear ear plugs and can't really do much after about 9pm.

Cuts are reasonably smooth if you take it slow, and I've had pretty good luck minimizing the chipping at the end of the cut. No doubt a few $$ for a better blade would help, especially if I was cutting something like marble (I'm not).

Laser is nice - especially for cutting smaller pieces or odd angles where the fence doesn't really work well. and dittos to the earlier comment about safety.

the one downside - the clamp-on angle guide will not open to a full 45. It's off a degree or two - enough to be noticeable on larger tiles. The good news regarding service is that I called the 800 support number and actually got an English-speaking person! Told him about the angle issue and he sent me a new attachment - arrived in less than a week. Bad news is that it's exactly like the one I have. So my choice appears to be return the saw or file down the edge of the guide a little. I suspect I'll try the filing now that I have a spare guide to play with.

Bottom line - if I was a pro I probably wouldn't buy this saw. But for the weekend warrior/remodeler who can cut-a-few/set-a-few and not overload the motor it's quite a bit of saw for the money. Be sure to buy it with a credit card that has the extended warranty feature. Yes, I know the argument about buying a "pro" saw and selling later - I did that with a sheet-metal bender for siding a few years ago and did quite well. But wife wants something for hobbies and I'm sure small projects will come up so we'll keep it and use it occasionally. Size and weight, plus wheeled stand make it easy to move around. But I don't think Felker has a lot to worry about just yet.

edit: almost forgot - This is important! If you opt for the Husky be sure to register on their website. They wouldn't send the part until I did. The trick is there's a time constraint and the website address is not that obvious. It's in the "important" paragraph on page 2 - which of course no DIYer worth his salt ever reads.
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Last edited by sandbagger; 05-20-2006 at 12:59 PM.
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Unread 05-20-2006, 01:47 PM   #14
Beachman
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I bought a QEP Bridge Saw from Home Depot to do my first tile job. A bridge saw is the type of saw where the piece being cut remains stationary and the saw/motor slides along a top rail. I'm a homeowner, not a professional. The thing weighs a ton but is on casters and the legs fold up. It may not be too practical for the everyday professional tile layer. But, boy did it make my life easier!! I layed my 18x18 porcelain tile on the diagonal and I could make a one pass cut down the middle on a diagonal (approx. 24") without having to move the tile. I'll probably sell it when I'm through and be out about $100.
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Unread 05-20-2006, 05:28 PM   #15
Zaritile
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did the qep make a lot of noise? I saw and thought about, but I like useing the felker fhs-4 handheld. I mark my line on the tile with a framing square, then cut. It cuts smooth, and it is very portable. Some pros will say my cuts will not look good this way, but every cut tile that you can see the cut edge, I take my grinder and make it like a factory edge. A big wet saw wont give you that slight bevel anyways, so it works great. I have a very steady hand, so its not much of hassle for me holding that 7 pound felker, but if you got a shakey handy, your screwed. Great for cutting tiolet flange hole too.
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