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Unread 12-11-2020, 05:09 PM   #16
condo-owner
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or, you could put in a footing, post, and cross beam.
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Unread 12-12-2020, 07:05 AM   #17
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Am I understanding this right that if I can get that 2/3 of the span or put in a post and support, then the existing joists are sufficiently reinforced... *then* I could sister in new joists that only run the length of the room to be tiled to level the floor and make it a flat plane? (Basically two different solutions to the two problems?) The long joists provide the needed rigidity, and the short ones are tied into the long ones?
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Unread 12-12-2020, 09:16 AM   #18
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I think I understand the question, Matt, and yes, that would be correct. The pieces you use for the leveling and flattening need not be the same size as the joists. They could be 2x6 (I don't like 2x4 just because of the fastening surface) and could also be of lesser grade and species than the sister joists.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 12-12-2020, 09:27 AM   #19
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I'm a little late to the game here, but I endorse the CX method of sistering. It's the easiest, most "level" and strongest thing to do.
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Unread 12-12-2020, 10:15 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MesaTileworks View Post
Am I understanding this right that if I can get that 2/3 of the span or put in a post and support, then the existing joists are sufficiently reinforced... *then* I could sister in new joists that only run the length of the room to be tiled to level the floor and make it a flat plane? (Basically two different solutions to the two problems?) The long joists provide the needed rigidity, and the short ones are tied into the long ones?
when in this room, can you feel the floor bouncing(to any degree) when you jump on it ? if you can, go under the floor with a 2 boards, 2x4 would be fine.

wedge them under the floor like an upside down T. put it on the center most joist in the center of the floor. now go back into the room and jump on it again and see what happens.
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Unread 12-12-2020, 09:01 PM   #21
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Alright, thanks y’all. Will confab with the missus and the guy who’s doing basement work. I feel silly that I hadn’t anticipated the problem of the span. We might reconsider the timing the bathroom floor and shower base if the basement fortifications seem too complicated or prohibitively expensive. Early on, we considered tile only on the shower walls (with a prefab acrylic base and vinyl flooring outside the shower), so if we can’t get the minimum specs we need, we might go back to that idea.
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Unread 12-13-2020, 10:20 PM   #22
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Related issue with a similar situation in the upstairs bathroom...

Assuming that the span issue is taken care of (with additional joists or a crossbeam and posts), in terms of leveling the floor: is it necessary to sister-on pieces of framing, or could the leveling be done with ripped strips screwed to the top of the joists? Some of the joists are already doubled and if I can put the pieces in on top, it will save some space for plumbing.

... but if they need to be sistered, that’s probably workable... in which case the question is, are 2x4s ok or should it be 2x6s?
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Unread 12-14-2020, 08:36 AM   #23
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Matt, if you want to add 2X's to the sides of the existing joists only for the purpose of leveling then 2X4's are fine - unless the 2X4 will be substantially higher than the existing joist(s). In other words, if the top edge of the 2X4 is even with the top edge of the existing joist at one end, but is 2" higher than the joist at the other when the 2X4 is level, it leaves only 1.5" to drive screws. Ideally you want to stagger the screws; drive them in a W pattern. If you drive them in a straight line you run the risk of splitting the 2X4 or the joist.

If you need to add 2X's to the existing joists to strengthen them/reduce their deflection then 2X6's (minimum) will be needed, and will need to be 2/3rds the length of the existing joists, and centered on those joists.

As far as ripping and adding to the tops of the joists, maybe, but I think you'll find that those rips will split as soon as you try to screw them on or, worse, will split when you screw down the subfloor but you won't see that they split.
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Unread 12-14-2020, 10:23 AM   #24
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What Dan said. See post #18.
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Unread 12-14-2020, 08:45 PM   #25
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Got the joists sistered and ply glued and screwed. It all feels pretty solid. Still need to figure out what to do with the downstairs bathroom where sistering joists doesn’t seem like a viable option given that the area is full of plumbing. Might go something other than tile on the floor and use a prefab acrylic shower pan or might put in a crossbeam as suggested. Thanks for the help, y’all!
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Unread 12-15-2020, 09:06 AM   #26
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The next engineering question has to do with the tub. We’d like to reinstall the original tub if we can (pics below), but one of the hook thingies that would attach to a bracket is no longer in place. Even *if* we can find a suitable bracket to hook the back side of the tub into the studs, it would only connect in that one place.

I’ve seen tubs attached to the joists with screws, so I’m wondering whether it is an option to drill some holes in the lip of the tub and fasten it to the studs, maybe also resting the tub’s back edge on a 2x4 fastened to the studs with screws?

But... the lip of the tub is 1” high and I’m concerned that screws passing through it might be a risk for water intrusion? (I’d planned to use Durock or HB for the surround and put on a liquid waterproofing membrane, maybe also caulking the place where the CBU meets the tub with Kerdifix or similar, so I don’t know if this is a cause for concern?

Anyone know if they make brackets that would attach from above and fit over the lip and then I could furr out the studs so the CBU sits flush?







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Unread 12-15-2020, 09:14 AM   #27
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Maybe something like this process? (Ledger board for the back edge, mortar underneath, screws and stainless washers to hold the lip tight against the studs?)


https://youtu.be/Axe2j4QrJCE
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Unread 12-23-2020, 03:08 AM   #28
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Sorry that we missed your questions earlier, Matt.

If you haven't already gotten past the tub installation, what kind of tub is it? Steel, fiberglass, cast iron, etc...
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Unread 01-05-2021, 06:48 AM   #29
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The tub is enameled steel. I think I’ve figured out how to notch the studs, put up a ledger strip, and catch the lip of the tub with washers as in the video linked earlier.

I’m wondering if I need to put something under the tub like what the guy does in the video or if this is not needed since being steel it’s less flexible than fiberglass?

I’m also wondering about resurfacing the tub to get rid of some rust spots. Anyone done this?
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Unread 01-05-2021, 07:13 AM   #30
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No idea what refinishing that enamel over steel tub would cost, Matt, nor how durable that refinishing would be, but I'm willing to guess refinishing it probably isn't much less expensive than replacing it with a new one.

Regardless, those tubs are noisy compared to their cast iron equivalents. Maybe look up the installation instructions for the "Americast" tubs (also enamal/steel) and see if they mention setting the tub in or on anything.

If your tub doesn't have any sound deadener installed consider adding some.
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