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Unread 11-14-2002, 06:37 PM   #1
moneypit
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Welcome to my palace

Hello there. It's been a while. I finally scraped enough funds together to do the bathroom remodel. Here are some photos:http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/cash18pit...throom&.view=t Hope they dont give you nightmare.

As you can see from the pics, this bathroom have water problems. The roof is fixed but all the pipes need to be replaced with copper. Since my budget including fixtures is only $3K I have to do as much of the work myself as possible. Although after lurking around this forum gives me knowledge about the tiling work, I am quite unsure about the demolition and plumbing parts.

Let me start with questions regarding demolition tools. I've got crow bars, and I know I need a heavy hammer and some chisels but should I get a reciprocating saw and rent a power chiseling tool to shorten my time without any plumbing?
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Unread 11-14-2002, 07:41 PM   #2
tomtuttle
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I'm no expert....

...but I'm sure some smart person will be along shortly.

As a totally OJT DIYer, I've gotta say that using a sawzall is the single most satisfying power tool experience I've ever had. It'll help with not only the framing stuff, but the plumbing too. I love demolition now. And just go ahead and buy the sledge hammer(s). It feels good, and you're gonna need em if that wall tile is set in mud.
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Unread 11-14-2002, 07:42 PM   #3
Bud Cline
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$3000.00 huh? Tom what is it your going to do for $3000?





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Unread 11-14-2002, 07:45 PM   #4
tomtuttle
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Bud, I'm not doing *anything* except sharing my enthusiasm for demolition. I get paid less than Dave M.
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Unread 11-14-2002, 08:06 PM   #5
John Bridge
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Hi Money Pit. I forgot your name.

I don't think you'll make it on $3,000, even doing all the work yourself. You've got a shower and a tub surround, a floor and a vanity top. Paint, plumbing. You'll need more money, maybe twice that much, depending on the tile and fixtures you choose.

That tile is not pink, by the way. It's rose. I remember it well. Haven't seen the little pencil liner in a long time.

You better believe all the tile is installed over mud. Big, big hammer.

We can help you with the plumbing and other aspects of the job. You're gonna be without a bathroom for a while, though.
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Unread 11-14-2002, 08:09 PM   #6
Bud Cline
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That was kinda my thoughts.


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Unread 11-14-2002, 08:39 PM   #7
John Joesph
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moneypit,
I just spent around 7 grand and have not bought the tub, trim or painted. It was all DIY. Oh, yea, the wife hasn't bought all the other stuff that goes in a new bath, like 3000 bucks worth of towels and bath mats. I can't wait.
Seriously, as someone that is almost done, do yourself a big favor and price out everything, I mean everything you can think of. Then add about 25%. Because it is never enough. I used about 200 bucks worth of thinset and grout more than I calculated. Believe it or not my bill from the local hardware store for 30 dollars worth of Furncos here and 40 dollars worth of 14/2 there ran up to $1000.00 in a little over 2 months. I think I went through a few hundred pounds of screws and nails, sure felt like it.
I really don't think you will get all the fixtures you will need at Homeless Despot for less than 3 grand.
Price it all out.
Good Luck
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Unread 11-14-2002, 08:54 PM   #8
Bud Cline
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Good advice I'd say...it's never good to jump into these things under capitolized.


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Unread 11-15-2002, 08:54 PM   #9
moneypit
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Thanks for the reality check. I think the best way may be is to put together a shop list and price out the materials. Hopefully it will help me find ways to stage the project to fit the budget. $3K isnt much but to someone without employment or hope of one in the near future it isn't a small sum. And this project is a must do. It is not like I want to replace the rose color tiles. The bathroom and plumbing are on borrowed time.

I am aware that I will lose inside plumbing for a while but I hope by planning ahead I could minimize surprises and thus keep project time to minimum.

My rough schedule is one week for demolition, one week for replacing pipes and two weeks for all the tiling work. Once new plumbings are in after week 2, I will regain some access to the facilities. My neighbor offered to let me use her shower. I figure I can handle living like a cave man for two weeks.

Back to the project. Hammer - 3lb, 4lb or more? Actually when I took the pictures I could see from the garage that the shower pan is actually thin plastic and I could easily break off a chunk of grey mud with my hand. With these info do you have any idea how the shower is built. It is sloped and layered because the floor height inside and outside shower curb are about 1 1/2" difference.

Your comments and suggestions are welcome and much appreciated.
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Unread 11-15-2002, 09:11 PM   #10
John Bridge
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It is a mud shower. Behind the wall tiles is concrete. Below the floor tiles is concrete. It is a bear to tear out.

Since you are on a tight budget, I must tell you that the shower can be repaired without completely tearing it out. You can replace the bottom of the shower and install a new shower pan in the process.

The tub surround is probably serviceable, too.

If you are primarily concerned with the functionality of the bath, don't start chopping.

If, on the other hand, you want a complete re-do, you'll need more money. There's really no question of that.
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Unread 11-15-2002, 09:12 PM   #11
Bud Cline
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It doesn't matter how it's built the best approach is to go after it aggressively, it all has to come out.


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Unread 11-16-2002, 11:40 AM   #12
ninemile
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Unhappy

Moneypit, I'm looking at the same type of project for my 2nd floor bath in my 106 yr old house. Just for fun I had 3 licensed plumbers estimate disconnecting all the fixtures & removal, repipe to bath (new risers from basement, rebuild vent etc) and then install an exposed shower, claw foot tub, pedestal sink, toilet, shutoffs, etc. all 3 bids were roughly $8,000!! (I will be doing all the tile/paint/trim/demo/plaster/wainscot)

Yes, I understand that you are DIY and are braver than I (sorry but I've seen what bad plumbing can do) but repipe/rewater is full of landmines and can make a big mess if not given the time and dollars to do it right. I'd say $3,000 budget needs to be $8-10K for a complete demo & remodel.

Keep us posted on what you do and Good Luck!!! Colleen

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Unread 04-03-2003, 12:02 AM   #13
moneypit
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leap of faith

Finally started the bathroom remodel. Ripped out some drywall to see what is behind. While I was hacking at the wall, I kept expecting skeletons following out from the wall space. No dead body just mold, dry rot, ant tracks, tear shaped empty cocoons hanging down from cross beams. It is disgusting.

I swear I read everything on this site and studied plumbing, tiling, bath remodeling books, but besides taking down the existing tile walls and floor, I have no idea what I am going to do next. My brain went blank. Am I in shock? Is this common?
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Unread 04-03-2003, 06:30 AM   #14
Brian Briggs
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Yes this is common, now that it has started there is no return. Try to minimize mistakes by properly planning each phase to minimize mistakes. The less mistakes and redoes you make the laess money this is going to cost you. Good luck on staying within your budget and if you can stay within that budget you are a better man than I.


Good luck and have fun.
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Unread 04-03-2003, 08:09 AM   #15
tileguytodd
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Which brings up the question
What is a Budget??
A: A guideline to follow until you find something you really want

Dont stop now, go man go until you run outa money.Then beg borrow or go do demolition for someone that will pay you cause yer gettin good at it now!!
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