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Unread 08-19-2015, 12:15 PM   #61
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Sounds like you're grasping the concept, but I don't understand the part where you said the butted eighth-bends moved exactly the amount you wanted, but still you were 3/4" off with your riser. You go the wrong direction, or what?

I suppose a fella could add a couple more eighth-bends, but I'd rather not do that. Don't know that it would be particularly harmful, though. Besides, I'll never hafta try to get my wedding ring outa that trap.

For a short run of pipe like I see inna photo I'd not wanna be forcing one end 3/4" laterally were it mine.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 08-19-2015, 12:35 PM   #62
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Thanks for the quick reply. Okay, that makes me feel a bit better knowing I can add just 2 more fittings safely even though it isn't ideal. It just will make my life easier to do it that way than to cut everything out. I'll go and buy some shortly and get working on it soon.

Oh, and it seems you posted your response just as I edited my previous response (haha, you were too quick) to add the explanation regarding the issue I had with installing the two 45s and why I was off my mark even though the 45s gave me the perfect lateral movement when butted together. I'll just cut and paste it here: I needed only 2 or 3 inches (can't remember at the moment the exact distance I needed) of lateral movement originally, and when I butted two 45s together I got the perfect amount of lateral distance. The only reason it is not perfectly aligned now is because when I solvent welded the 45s to the stub pipe I did not rotate the pair of two 45s properly before the PVC cement dried on the stub pipe... if that makes sense. I over rotated them, as one rotates PVC that is being solvent welded to get the PVC cement to evenly distribute in the joint, except I over rotated it... and off my measured mark. I believe that if I added any straight PVC between the two 45s I would have not been able to get lateral distance right since it would exceed the 2 or 3 inches of lateral movement I needed.

If that still doesn't make sense, because it is a bit hard to explain, I had solvent welded the two 45s together as one unit before working on the stub pipe. That solvent weld of the two 45s as a unit went fine. But then when I went to solvent weld the pair of 45s to the drain pipe in the ground, I rotated the 45s too far clockwise and it moved the stub drain pipe 3/4 of an inch off its mark. So the butted 45s gave me the perfect lateral distance, but due to me over-rotating it when solvent welding the pair to the drain pipe, it landed off its mark. I over-rotated because of the space being awkward to get my hands in, and then by the time I noticed, it was too difficult to rotate it back.
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Unread 08-19-2015, 01:56 PM   #63
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Sounds like you should be able to cut the pipe below the two fittings and install a coupling to allow you to rotate the riser into the correct position.
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Unread 08-19-2015, 05:06 PM   #64
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Hi CX, I had just read your post but I already added the two 22.5 degree DWV joints. It looks a bit amateurish but all I care about is that it functions properly and meets code.

In the end, I'm okay with it even though a coupling would have done the trick. The big box store didn't have schedule 40 for these specific joints, so I just went with the regular DWV-non schedule 40 PVC- which I believe is okay for a shower drain. I also believe DWV PVC can solvent weld fine to schedule 40 since they're both PVC. I ended up solvent welding the DWV 22.5 degree couplings together, and then solvent welded that to the Schedule 40 PVC stub, and then solvent welded an additional length of Schedule 40 PVC on top for the drain stub.

Weird thing is it's still a tad off, but it is much better than before. Before there was too much pressure on the drain stub, now it has a lot less. I can live with it now.

I should be able to finally get the shower pan permanently set soon. Just going to prep the studs a bit more, then I'll lay down some 6 mil plastic, put some mortar down to bed the shower pan, and then nail it in with the clips that came with the base.
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Unread 10-05-2019, 05:32 PM   #65
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Sorry for the delay in keeping up with my project. Life just gets in the way sometimes. I had gotten sidetracked from this project due to work, and now finally have some more free time and motivation to get it done. I recently started it up again and installed the shower pan and set it in quikrete mortar, and all looks good so far. The next thing on my mind is that I will have to fur out two walls a bit. I was going to buy just basic furring strips but I want closer to 3/4 inch thickness in the strips, and my local hardware store only carries 1 inch thickness in furring strips. So I'm going to just cut some strips of plywood or OSB into 3/4 in X 1.5 in X 8 feet. I heard that OSB is stronger than plywood in one respect, but swells more with water. So should I only use plywood? Here are my two choices:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Common-1...0000/309026359

https://www.homedepot.com/p/23-32-in...7946/100041308

One is OSB and the other is RTD Sheathing Syp. Is either one of these okay? Thanks in advance, can't wait to finally get this shower done. It has been too long lol.
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Unread 10-05-2019, 06:23 PM   #66
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Why not run down a 2x4 through a table saw?
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Unread 10-05-2019, 06:37 PM   #67
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That's a great idea actually, I'm just not very knowledgeable on this stuff so I didn't know what wood was considered structurally acceptable for furring out the walls since I will be adding cement board and tiling. I had read a bit on here and some don't even recommend the store bought furring strips since they can split and were recommending plywood. If you think 2x4's are safe to use to fur out the walls, then add Durock cement board, then tile, then I will do that. That is a much cheaper option than buying plywood. Only thing is I don't have a table saw, but maybe I could do it with an electric circular saw? You think any old 2x4 cut down to size will be safe? I wasn't sure if a 2x4 that was sliced to 3/4 inch was prone to splitting or not. But if that's too hard for me to do, I'm okay with buying some plywood instead.
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Unread 10-05-2019, 07:57 PM   #68
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The 3/4" rips from the 2x4 are likely to be very prone to splitting when you attach your wallboard, AM. I would recommend the rips of plywood or just sistering the existing studs with additional studs to increase the depth, plumb, and flatten the wall at the same time.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-05-2019, 08:12 PM   #69
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Okay thanks CX for that information. I will most likely go with plywood then, rather than sistering the studs with more more studs. Is there a preference between OSB vs Plywood? I read that OSB was stronger than plywood, but OSB also absorbs water more and swells. Are either of these okay to purchase:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Common-1...0000/309026359

https://www.homedepot.com/p/23-32-in...7946/100041308

One is OSB and the other is RTD Sheathing Syp (plywood sheathing). Never actually bought this stuff so wanted to make sure to get the right wood for this purpose.
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Unread 10-06-2019, 06:03 AM   #70
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I'm not a fan of OSB, AM, but assuming your walls will be waterproofed correctly strips of OSB will be fine.

I'd be very surprised if the furring strips at your hardware store are actually 1" thick. And keep in mind that 3/4" ply/OSB isn't 3/4" thick, it's shy about 1/32nd or so.
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Unread 10-13-2019, 08:08 PM   #71
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Okay thanks for the reply, I guess I will avoid OSB just to be safe if you're not a fan of it. Is this RTD Sheathing Syp from Home Depot okay for cutting down into furring strips?:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/23-32-in...7946/100041308

It says that it is plywood sheathing on the website, but I just want to make sure it's okay for furring strips. Or should I get some other kind of wood?
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Unread 10-13-2019, 08:18 PM   #72
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AM, that's essentially a CD grade plywood and will have some substantial voids on both the outer and inner plies. When ripping it in narrow strips, you may even get strips that fall apart in the center. Won't make a whole lot of difference in your application, but be aware that it's not particularly good material.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-13-2019, 08:30 PM   #73
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Thanks CX, I want decent material so I'll avoid that CD grade plywood. I'll sleep better at night knowing that all the heavy tile and cement board I'll eventually attach to the walls isn't attached to cheap plywood. So I looked up another plywood from Home Depot. Is this BC grade plywood considered respectable for this purpose?:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/23-32-in...1428/100061386
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Unread 10-13-2019, 09:22 PM   #74
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BC exterior glue plywood will be fine for your application.

I recommend you attach such furring strips to the studs using a good construction adhesive and as few fasteners as will give you a good glue contact.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-13-2019, 09:35 PM   #75
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Thanks so much, I'll go ahead and get that BC graded plywood then. Once cut into furring strips, I'll attach the furring strips with Liquid Nails Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive to the existing studs and I'll try to minimize the number of fasteners I use to secure them to the studs. Thanks again, much appreciated CX
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