Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Unread 10-29-2019, 12:19 PM   #1
bcs001
Bruce
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dahlonega Ga.
Posts: 54
Raising a Concrete Floor

Hey Guys. I'm back with a new project in a home I've just moved into. Planning to tile a sun room that was built over an exterior slab porch. This ~200 sqft space is now heated & cooled but about 5"-6" below the finished floor of the house and sloping about 2" in 8 ft away from the original exterior wall.

I'd like to it raise it about 4" at the near side and 6" at the far side to get it flat & level. What is the recommended method for raising a concrete floor that is is excellent condition. No cracks, pits or damage of any kind. Just a little stained from 30 years of being covered with solid bricks as the finished flooring.

Thanks,
Bruce.
__________________
Bruce
bcs001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Unread 10-29-2019, 12:37 PM   #2
john619
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 160
pour new slab on top
__________________
john
john619 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-29-2019, 12:38 PM   #3
speed51133
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Milwaukee WI area
Posts: 812
what will the finished floor material be? Carpet/tile/wood/bare concrete??

A simple mud mix would be the cheapest and easiest. It is essentially a mix of 4-5 parts portland cement and 1 sand. This would work for tile as the finished floor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2NOx74qrhY

skim coat it with thinset first to bond it.

Or, if you have access to the area from outside, you can pump in or chute in concrete.
__________________
Mike

Last edited by speed51133; 10-29-2019 at 12:43 PM.
speed51133 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-29-2019, 01:03 PM   #4
bcs001
Bruce
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dahlonega Ga.
Posts: 54
Will be laying tile on the raised floor. this area is accessible from outside and can get a concrete truck close enough to wheel barrow loads into the room.

Any special preparation needed on the old surface?

Is rebar or lathe needed in the new 4"-6" slab?
__________________
Bruce
bcs001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-29-2019, 07:16 PM   #5
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 31,859
If I'm going to bond the deck mud with thinset, I don't use lath.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-29-2019, 07:59 PM   #6
jadnashua
Veteran DIYer- Schluterville Graduate

STAR Senior Contributor

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 13,093
It's easier to get a mud bed perfectly flat than a concrete pour. I'm assuming that this will now be enclosed, otherwise, you should retain the slope.
__________________
Jim DeBruycker
Not a pro, multiple Schluter Workshops (Schluterville and 2013 and 2014 at Schluter Headquarters), Mapei Training 2014, Laticrete Workshop 2014, Custom Building Products Workshop 2015, and Longtime Forum Participant.
jadnashua is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-29-2019, 11:14 PM   #7
cx
Moderator emeritus
 
cx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Boerne, Texas
Posts: 88,572
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce
...a sun room that was built over an exterior slab porch. This ~200 sqft space is now heated & cooled...
I took that to mean it was fully enclosed now, Jim.

I'd agree with you that it's easier to get the mud bed flat enough even for very large format tile because it's actually possible to do that, which is not the case with poured concrete. Bring me the guy that can finish a large concrete slab flat to 1/8th-inch in ten feet and I'll see that he's properly worshiped as the god he must be.
__________________
CX

Y'ALL NEW VISITORS READ THIS HERE!
cx is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-30-2019, 05:14 AM   #8
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 31,859
The pic I posted above was just that. They wanted the floor leveled first and then the sunroom was built. It was mostly metal and windows. Best I remember I came back and skim coated the mud so it wouldn't erode and walk up. Then once the exterior walls were built, the red door you see was removed and other work was done. Then I put down a membrane and tiled the floor.

After getting the sand and cement on the job, seems like the mud work took about a half day.
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-30-2019, 05:33 AM   #9
bcs001
Bruce
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dahlonega Ga.
Posts: 54
Great info for us amateurs. Thanks much!!!

Now to finish this topic off......can I get an idea about cost. Going the mud bed route for this large an area would be more than I want to do myself so how would hiring this out compare to hiring someone to do a concrete pour and then me coming back with an SLC finish layer to get flat?

Bruce.
__________________
Bruce
bcs001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-30-2019, 04:39 PM   #10
jadnashua
Veteran DIYer- Schluterville Graduate

STAR Senior Contributor

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 13,093
FWIW, SLC needs some help getting level, and you may end up with it not being any better than your slab unless the guys are good. It's certainly easier to get it nice and flat versus a concrete pour, though. Also, while it would end up more, many SLC products can be used with pea gravel to minimize how much actual product you use. Should you go with concrete, keep in mind that industry standards call for letting it cure for at least 28-days prior to covering with tile. There is an exception that I know of, Schluter allows you to put Ditra over a green slab as soon as it can be walked on, and then tile it. Depending on your schedule, that can be a big thing. The issue with concrete is that as it initially cures, it shrinks, and that movement can compromise the bonds for tile. While it's not fully cured at 28-days, it is pretty much shrunk as much as you can tell without laboratory instruments.
__________________
Jim DeBruycker
Not a pro, multiple Schluter Workshops (Schluterville and 2013 and 2014 at Schluter Headquarters), Mapei Training 2014, Laticrete Workshop 2014, Custom Building Products Workshop 2015, and Longtime Forum Participant.
jadnashua is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-30-2019, 06:35 PM   #11
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 31,859
Like Jim said, putting down SLC isn't quite as easy as dumping it out and watching it flow nice and level. If you don't think you can handle mudding the floor with deck mud then I think it's best to find a good concrete man that can pour the concrete fairly flat. Then you can do any fine tuning with floor patch or filler. Many times I've used primer and SLC to fill low areas. I've also used thinset if the thickness is less than 1/4 inch.
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-31-2019, 05:50 AM   #12
bcs001
Bruce
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dahlonega Ga.
Posts: 54
I've done three SLC jobs and know how to work with that material using a metal rake to get it moving once poured. The 30 day cure before tile will be a small inconvenience but not really to big a deal. The added cost of thinset and ditra would be something to consider though. I'll get some pricing for putting down a mud bed vs a concrete pour and go from there.

As always, I appreciate the great info!!

Bruce.
__________________
Bruce
bcs001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-31-2019, 07:54 AM   #13
speed51133
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Milwaukee WI area
Posts: 812
I never heard of a 30 day cure for SLC????
__________________
Mike
speed51133 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-31-2019, 07:59 AM   #14
bcs001
Bruce
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dahlonega Ga.
Posts: 54
The 30 day cure was in reference to Jim's comment if I were to go with an initial concrete pour. Sorry for the confusion.

Bruce.
__________________
Bruce
bcs001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-02-2019, 08:17 AM   #15
JerseyDIYguy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 227
I'm going to suggest an alternative: Put down tapered sleeper joists topped with plywood and lay your tile over that.

With the area and heights you have you're looking at 4 tons or more of mud bed and SLC material to build it up to level. Definitely not something for the ordinary DIY person.

With sleeper joists you can also insulate which may or may not be important to you depending on how you'll use the room.

I've found that by scribing the joists to the slope of the existing floor you can get a very level and flat subfloor. Scribing the sleepers also provides full contact support from the underlying concrete along the entire length of the sleeper. No worries about stiffness/deflection that way, and it's a relatively straightforward job that a DIY'er can accomplish if they take their time.
__________________
Warren
JerseyDIYguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Raising tile height over large concrete area jranson Tile Forum/Advice Board 9 09-28-2016 12:08 AM
raising tile height on concrete floor? cidme Tile Forum/Advice Board 15 09-29-2010 04:09 PM
Is Concrete Adhesive In Mortar Ok When Raising Shower Curb To Its Final Height? Iggy Tile Forum/Advice Board 4 09-22-2006 05:24 PM
Raising Concrete Floor Height lto Tile Forum/Advice Board 14 06-09-2006 03:20 PM
raising height of concrete floor redbull Tile Forum/Advice Board 10 04-07-2004 09:03 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:43 PM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018 John Bridge & Associates, LLC