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Unread 09-20-2007, 03:51 PM   #1
MikeInCali
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screwing hardibacker

So I bought the screws that are made for hardibacker and it states right on the package that countersinking is not necessary, but darn if the screw head still stops a good 16th of an inch above flush. Is it me or has anyone else found this to be the case?

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Unread 09-20-2007, 03:53 PM   #2
opiethetileman
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i use a duofast coil nailer that counter sinks my nails. after I install the hardi then I coat the entire floor with loose thinset then after it dries I rub it downa bit and tile. sometimes if ya dont have a good screw gun the heads sticks up
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Unread 09-20-2007, 03:54 PM   #3
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Definitely...

I have found that to be the case . Try and get them down as much as possible . I always buy the ones with the square head . I like those better than the regular phillips head ones. The notch trowel should go over a 1/16th pretty good.
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Unread 09-20-2007, 04:30 PM   #4
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Yes, I had a similar problem. The other thing is that those little ridges under the head of the screw chew up this little volcanic cone of hardibacker material around the screw head so it was kind of hard to figure out if they were flush or not. I finally started using a putty knife to just scrape over each one and then I tightened it down more until the putty knife stopped hitting metal. FYI, this took maximum torque setting on my 15.6V Panasonic driver.

One other thing I wonder about is whether there's a pattern to putting the screws in? What I did was put them in all around the edges first so that it would be all nice and squared up with the cabinet edges but this seemed to squish the thinset towards the middle and the closer I got to the middle this baloon of thinset got bigger and bigger. Putting screws in the middle mostly flattened it out but I still had something that looked like a dimpled cushion, it wasn't perfectly flat. Is there a pattern that prevents this?
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Unread 09-20-2007, 04:38 PM   #5
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Square head screws are the way to go. Never had much luck with phillips.
As mentioned go over the floor with a drywall broad knife and hit all the high heads with a hammer until you have eliminated the clik clik clik of hight screws.
There is a pattern. Hardi has an x for where each screw should go. You need to start at one end and work to the other. Doing around the edge first and then filling in the middle is asking for trouble. There is going to be the center of each sheet the is not fastened down flat. Might only be a small hump but when it does finally settle out there is a good chance of problems in that area.
Good Luck
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Unread 09-21-2007, 11:21 AM   #6
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Thanks JTG; that's good info. I'll modify my procedure.
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Unread 09-21-2007, 11:27 AM   #7
Brian in San Diego
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Mike, it seems like you're starting a new thread every time you have a question. The moderators would like everyone to adhere to a "one project, one thread" policy. No matter what the question, if it has anything to do with a project keep it on one thread. It makes it easier for those helping and following along to know the background and have continuity to your project.

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Unread 09-22-2007, 10:43 AM   #8
larry528
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All I evcer use for any project, woodowrking, home imporvement or fixing the trailer is square drive screws

but the question I have as I will be using hardibacker for a shower project is what TYPE of metal screw to use?

Steel?
stainless?
regular sheetrock type?

we dont mark off for bad spelling do oui?
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Unread 09-22-2007, 10:58 AM   #9
deepwater
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Just use galvanized nails. I use a roofing nail gun with galvanized roofing nails
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Unread 09-22-2007, 11:14 AM   #10
slateface
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Hardi Square drive screws

Larry528, Hardi makes their own square drive screws. Since I found them, they're all I use. My local DalTile and American Olean both stock the 5 lbs boxes, which if I'm guessing right will do about 500SqFt.
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Unread 09-22-2007, 11:20 AM   #11
Dave Taylor
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Larry........

when working with Hardie.... I use these screws available at the big boxes.
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Unread 09-22-2007, 01:08 PM   #12
MikeInCali
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Thats them

Yep, thats what I'm using. Thanks for the replies. Maybe I'll try the ole AC powered drill to drive them in with a bit more power.

Ya know, I also found that the cutting of hardibacker is not as easy as advertised. I scored several times and it wouldnt snap at all until I scored the other side too, which means measuring and marking again (and getting it right).
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Unread 09-22-2007, 01:23 PM   #13
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Tip ?

The tip to cutting that stuff is a new sharp razor blade. They wear out fast so you'll go through them. Score it a couple times with some good cuts. Then snap it on top of something straight under it .
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Unread 09-22-2007, 02:22 PM   #14
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you need an assistant

Get a friend to help cut:

Put in a new blade before he arrives.
Show him how to do the cuts and how easy it is to cut.
Promise him a 12-pack if he does all of the rest of the cuts.

Problem solved

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Unread 09-22-2007, 04:56 PM   #15
koihito
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Seriously, use roofing nails. They meet manufacturer requirements and are WAY easier to use.
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