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Unread 11-02-2002, 07:23 PM   #151
John Bridge
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RJ and Michaelene need to pony up mucho dinero.

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Unread 11-02-2002, 07:37 PM   #152
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Si, Mucho Pesos Senoir..

mucho trabahjo too.....
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Unread 11-02-2002, 09:55 PM   #153
J.L. Burns
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Thanks for the advice- would you go one step further and tell them never ever consider doing a curbless shower?
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Unread 11-02-2002, 10:00 PM   #154
J.L. Burns
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John with tongue in cheek I ask you, "how do you keep that kinda shower clean?" A concerned homeowner in a tingy voice
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Unread 11-03-2002, 06:49 AM   #155
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The maid cleans this particular shower. I'll tell her what and what not to use before I leave.
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Unread 11-03-2002, 07:14 AM   #156
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John.

Do you have another picture that shows the jambs, so we can see how you finished them off?

Did you backbutter the granite tiles?

On the shampoo niche. Did you bullnose the edges?


This thread lives on.

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Unread 11-03-2002, 07:17 AM   #157
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Oh,i dont know,Ive done alot of curbless showers and done right they are fine.You really need to take a hard look at the mechanics though.
Handicap roll ins are becoming more and more desireable for many .With the advent of some of the new products (trowelable membranes etc) the mechanics arent even that critical anymore. I still like to drop the pan area though rather than build up outside room.Generally you only need to notch out a couple joists drop a length of 2x4 in full length.run 2x6 bridges across these at 16" OC and put down a good Plywood base.My absolute favorite method is to then do a standard pan liner run into the main room a foot.Pour an SLC in main room keeping back 16" from shower entrance.nail well a 1/4" CBU over 16" Area you left out in front with liner.(Nail it good) Coat it with Prored by C-Cure,let it dry.Feather area from SLC into the shower area with a good quality cementious fill. let dry.Now overcoat entire room up walls 2 inches and into shower pan area at least to drain.It wont leak,it cant leakand the entire room is protected from water dripping of wheel chairs or errant nurses spraying who knows what
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Unread 11-03-2002, 07:50 AM   #158
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Thank you so much Todd
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Unread 11-03-2002, 08:27 AM   #159
John Bridge
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John K.

I've been criticized so much for the way I install vertical stone tiles I'm almost afraid to say it. Almost.

I "spot" the tiles up on a hard mud bed. When I float the walls I tend to tilt them out just slightly, maybe an eigth out of plumb. I can then install the bottom courses of tile very close to the substrate without worrying about my walls leaning in on me further up. I use the six-foot level to keep things running plumb and flat on the way up.

I get two courses all the way around the bottom to begin with. Maybe three courses. I make sure the whole base is level, straight and plumb, and then I leave it overnight. Now you have a very solid base that will support the weight of the tiles as they go up.

Spotting the tiles, placing four good globs of mud on the back of each, allows you to keep everything on absolute plane as you go. This business of having to have 100 percent coverage is bunk. I've been doing it this way for many years and have never had a problem with tiles cracking or breaking after the fact. It's different on a floor, of course.

The curb, seat top and jambs of this shower will be fabricated from granite slab by the stone fabricators I work with frequently. I have made doubly sure I've left them with straight walls to work to. I'll go back to take a picture or two.

We back mitered the tiles that surround the niche and back mitered the inside pieces to fit, leaving only the bevel on the front. It's a very tricky operation, ending up with a hole that is exactly the demensions of one tile. You have to caulk the inside joints, as there is nothing behind the pieces to catch the grout. It would just keep pushing through.


Here's how to get started:



Once I get things lined out all the way around the bottom of the walls, I have Albert make all the corner cuts, enough to go clear to the top. There is then no question that all the walls, including corners will be perfectly straight and plumb. It just can't come out any other way.
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Unread 11-03-2002, 08:38 AM   #160
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In this pic we've just finished grouting, and I'm ready to walk away from the shower.

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Unread 11-03-2002, 09:04 AM   #161
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John, what's the story on that floor, did you make the little pieces from the big pieces? Is there any worry of it being slippery?
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Unread 11-03-2002, 05:29 PM   #162
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Wow.Nice granite shower,John.

My mortar is as dry as yours,I'm sure.I can walk on it right away if I have to.I just prefer the plastic trowel,especially on walls.The steel trowels make the mud bed too smooth for my liking,and none of mine are straight anymore.
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Unread 11-04-2002, 08:33 PM   #163
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Dave, I lost the battle years ago on making the little pieces out of big pieces. When asked by my builder what I would charge to do it, I said $400 in an attempt to disuade him. He said okay, and he's been specifying them ever since.

Cut in 3-in. squares it's not as slippery as you might think -- just a bitch to maintain. But again, that's the maid's problem, I guess.

Ron,

I've never owned a plastic trowel. I might try one.
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Unread 11-04-2002, 08:45 PM   #164
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I've never seen a plastic trowel, 'cept those little bitty notched disposable thingees at the HD. Are we talking about a serious trowel? Is it thick plastic, like a magnesium or wood float? 'Splain me, please.
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Unread 11-04-2002, 09:02 PM   #165
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Hi
If you've seen the wall treatments that they are doing over extruded foam panels with modified acyrlic thin sets over top, you will notice the installers using plastic trowels to do the finish work. They are about 1/8 thick, and do a really nice job..but I'm not sure why.
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