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Old 09-24-2018, 12:55 PM   #1
Larmonkm
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Monica's Shower or something similar

*Too much pea gravel on weep holes?*

I am the researcher, and my husband is the doer.

We have been doing great getting everything on track and done right. We did the pre slope, liner, water test, etc. Build the mud bed using the 5:1 ratio. Did the pea gravel over the weep holes.

I'm afraid maybe my husband used too much around the drain. When he was building the bed, some of the pebbles pushed up close to the surface.

The entire bed is solid (no hollow spots), however there are small spots next to the drain where a few pebbles are peeking through. We are worried about the integrity there. We know there is a slight low spot that we plan to correct with thinset (less than 1/4").

I've read every thread/blog/site I can find on this subject, but I've not seen this exact scenario addressed. I read that if we use a thinset as a slurry, we could remove the little spot and apply the slurry, and then add a touch more bed mortar there. But this was in reference to removing tile and accidentally pulling up some mortar.

Is this correct? Please help. We have been so careful doing everything. We are at the stage where we're about to apply thinset & tape to the HardieBacker seams, and we don't want to go further until we fix this.

*hopefully my pics upload correctly*
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Old 09-24-2018, 05:03 PM   #2
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I was about to say to spread the pebbles out a little so the mud will be thicker at the drain but I see now you've already mudded it. I would probably break the mud away about 1 inch from the drain and remove some rocks. Then patch it in with thinset and mud. A vacuum should do the job. If you're using mosaics, the mud may cave in the way it is.

Did you use glue on pan corners?

Don't be afraid to ask questions beforehand.

Edit; What are you using on your walls as a substrate? We usually find it better to install cement board before mudding the floor. That way the mudbed holds the cement board in place along the bottom edge where you can't drive nails.
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Old 09-24-2018, 05:09 PM   #3
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Davy, no glue, but the pan is secured, no punctures below 6 inches. Passed the water test.

If we remove the 1 inch around and take out some rocks:

1. Do we use regular thinset texture or water down some?

2. Do we let the thinset dry before adding new mud?

3. As for the mud--do we use the regular sand/portland cement mix, or will a fat mud work? I assume the former, as the latter would harden too much and not allow proper drainage at the drain?

4. Yes, we should have asked questions. We were cruising along, googling, researching, and feeling good. And then we saw the pebbles. I'd even seen Floor Elf say on his site to not use too many. I just didn't realize it at the time.

Thank you!!
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Old 09-24-2018, 05:21 PM   #4
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1. You can mix the thinset a little runny but not so much that it runs down in between the pebbles.

2. No, you want the thinset to be wet when you add the mud. The mud alone won't bond well, the thinset acts as a bonder.

3. Use the same mud.

When I mentioned corners, I meant the glue on corners at the jamb/curb. These days, all I find are round black corners. Check out the shower construction thread in the "liberry". It shows square corners but they all work.
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Old 09-24-2018, 05:57 PM   #5
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Oh, I see! Yes, we used the Oatey corners with the X-15.

Thank you so much for the quick reply. We're doing this in the evenings after work and dinner, so we are on a tight schedule.
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Old 09-24-2018, 06:45 PM   #6
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Good deal. If you have any more questions, feel free to post them here in this thread.
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Old 09-26-2018, 10:14 AM   #7
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Installing Glass on Pony Wall (Waterproof??)

We have a short pony wall dividing the shower from the bathroom. It will have glass put back on it.

I've googled, read on here, etc.

We are doing all the work ourselves, so I am wondering how to install the glass to the marble cap on the pony wall without causing issues with water getting into the wall itself.

We did the pan, the liner, it passed the test. We did not put the liner over the pony wall, because we figured no matter what we use, we're installing the glass using screws into that wall.

We are doing AquaDefense on everything down to the bottom of the cbu on the wall (hardiebacker).

When we do this with the pony wall, how do we make sure that when we go through the marble, the waterproofing stays? Predrill everything? Silicone?

Please help!

While I'm asking--the marble is 6" wide and it will obviously need to slope towards the shower...how on earth do you install glass on something like this with a slope? We're using u brackets, not a channel.

Added pics of *not* my shower for reference.
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Old 09-26-2018, 10:17 AM   #8
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Something like this: I don't have a pic of the exact one on me. We will silicone between the glass and the marble and seal the inside of that.

Do things exist for screw penetration that plug/seal as they go in?

I'm not sure I'm asking the right questions.
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Old 09-26-2018, 11:05 AM   #9
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Okay, this might be a solution??

Mount vertically only.

Use something like Latapoxy 310R for the horizontal surface?!
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Old 09-26-2018, 01:56 PM   #10
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While the Latapoxy is probably going to be fine, I'd still do a bracket on the horizontal surface. Your marble slab is probably plenty thick so you can apply the stubbed screw method. Drill only as far into the marble without going near the waterproofing below. Then stub your screw to length, fill hole with epoxy and seat your bracket and screw. This gives you extra insurance. In this case, it'd suffice (or even be preferred) to use silicone caulking on the horizontal plane as well. Silicone is very strong in holding the glass by itself.

Regarding the bracket and the sloped plane, that's a good point. I solved the problem by grinding one side of the underside my floor bracket down to get it to sit level on the surface.
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Old 09-26-2018, 01:57 PM   #11
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Thank you so much. This has caused us a great deal of stress.
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Old 10-04-2018, 12:59 PM   #12
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Davy (And anyone else who does shower floor last)

How do you figure out the measurements for the last wall tile before laying the floor? We are disturbingly messy (no, really!), so we chose to save the floor for last.

If the floor tile (mosaic) is 1/4" thick, and we are using a 1/4" square trowel, what can we expect the thinset thickness to be? Or, what should the minimum thickness be? That will help me better calculate what we're working with. Also, do people backbutter mosaic floor tiles?

We've been good with our measurements so far, but I felt I should ask here.

My apologies if this should be added to my previous post. I thought maybe bc this was a general question, it would work separate? I'm good with whatever!
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Old 10-04-2018, 01:15 PM   #13
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Hello, Monica. Best to keep all questions related to this project on this thread. We can give it generic title if you want.

When doing the floor last, you'll have all the wall tile up, then cut the floor tile to leave a small gap where it meets the wall, which gets filled with silicone.
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Old 10-04-2018, 01:20 PM   #14
Larmonkm
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Thanks! If you are okay with editing my title to Monica's Shower or something similar (I have no preference) that would work.

I guess I'd never considered trimming the floor tile to meet the wall. I think my brain has officially turned to mush during this shower reno.
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Old 10-04-2018, 02:48 PM   #15
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It's probably easier to get a clean look if you have the wall tile cover the floor tile's edge, but either method works if you're neat about it.

Probably too late now, but if you were to use an engineered profile, you would get the advantage of hiding the edge and never having to use caulking that should last the life of the shower. Industry standards want something flexible at changes of plane or materials...an air gap, caulk, or profiles provide that (the air gap is probably not a good idea in a shower, though!). Various companies make profiles. The largest selection, and the original, are those from Schluter. The big box stores often carry a limited selection of them, and can order others if you can't find them locally elsewhere.
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