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Unread 10-29-2018, 06:55 PM   #16
JamesR
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I pulled the old tile up along with the 1/2" plywood under it. I am left with the 3/4" plywood subfloor. I was going to put the hardie cbu on the subfloor in place of 1/2" plywood. Are you saying that I need to put down 1/2" plywood again AND cbu?? My floor will be too high then.
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Unread 10-29-2018, 08:04 PM   #17
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James, the Hardiebacker has no structural value for your floor. If you read the manufacturer's instructions for the Hardiebacker, you'll see that your existing subflooring technically meets their requirements. Keep in mind that those requirements are based upon testing using new material in perfect condition, near perfectly installed over joists with zero deflection. You'll have none of those conditions, but it's entirely up to you what you elect to tile over.

James Hardie also recommends, as do all CBU manufacturers, his thinner nominal 1/4" board for floor installation unless you just want the additional height.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-30-2018, 12:58 PM   #18
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Our builder placed CBU directly on 3/4" subfloor, with joists of 16" spacing and the Deflecto calculates a deflection of L/480. (I can tell by simply looking at the "holes" in the floor for the vents).

It took less than 10 years for the tile and grout in front of the sink to crack.
(Son't recall if the CBU was or was not placed on a bed of thinset).
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Unread 10-30-2018, 02:22 PM   #19
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Interesting. I can't fit 1/2" plywood down there again and then add CBU on top of it. it will be way too high. The old tile floor which was original to the house built in 1996. So that tile was down for 20 years crack free. Am I better off just going back to putting down fresh 1/2" plywood, omitting the CBU and tiling like it was before??
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Unread 10-30-2018, 03:51 PM   #20
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You can do whatever you like in your house, James, but I'm gonna recommend against that.

While there is an industry recognized method of floor tiling directly to plywood, the requirements are very stringent and we (TYW) generally don't recommend the method to our visitors.

While I like a second layer of subflooring, with your 12" joist spacing I think you'd be much safer properly installing a CBU for your tiling substrate than you would with a plywood substrate.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-30-2018, 05:12 PM   #21
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1/2" plywood and a tile membrane would only raise the floor 5/8".
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Unread 11-03-2018, 06:18 AM   #22
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Based on the tile that the wife selected (12" square .3" thick) I have decided to go with the 1/4" hardie board over my 3/4" tongue/groove subfloor. As mentioned prior, the joists are 12" on center and 10.5" tall. The back wall of this 1/2 bath also sits right on top of the support beam in the basement. The floor is very solid.
Thanks for listening/commenting as I bounced my thoughts off of you folks.
Now to decide on the layout, patterns and offset. I will open a new topic for that with some pics so I can hear your suggestions, DO's, Don'ts, and experience.
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Unread 11-03-2018, 06:48 AM   #23
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James, it's best to keep all questions related to this project on this thread so that questions and answers aren't duplicated and the history is in one place.
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Unread 11-03-2018, 06:56 AM   #24
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Small bath, 12" tile layout suggestions (pics)

6' x 6' sized 1/2 bath. The layout will a have a toilet and a pedestal sink on the back wall. Lower half of the wall will be beadboard with chair rail.
Planning on the tile layout and would like to hear some suggestions or feedback on the layout. Going with a 12" porcelain tile that has a marbled appearance and large variations in shade/pattern. What works best for this application? Standard perpendicular layout or perhaps that with an offset, diagonal layout, 1/3 running, 1/2 running? See below for the tile appearance. Color is off in these pics. It is actually a grey/whitish marble appearance.
Hardie board is laid out for sizing , but not adhered yet hence the lack of screws and seam tape.
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Unread 11-03-2018, 06:59 AM   #25
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Darn, I assumed because it was now a different topic, that I would open a new thread. I just started a new one. Can we have a moderator move it to here and append?
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Unread 11-03-2018, 07:17 AM   #26
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It's all person preference, James. I'd ask Mrs. James, which one does she like?
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Unread 11-03-2018, 07:38 AM   #27
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To add another layer of personal preference to the mix; with a directional high variation pattern like you have, you have to think of how they’ll mix in visually. As you have them now, it looks like the middle row patterns up to the right, while the bottom row goes down to the right. I prefer to alternate and rotate each tile so they don’t have a single direction that varies row to row, unless I can pattern match them so it looks like one continuous flow across the whole surface.
I’ll agree with Davy in that the path of least resistance is to let Mrs. James decide (or not - that’s an additional layer of personal taste in there).
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Unread 11-03-2018, 07:52 AM   #28
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Yes, "Mrs James"...a.k.a Lisa would most likely have the final word. Then once I get them halfway installed she will say; "Hmmm, that is not what I thought it was going to look like". I just wanted to be sure that none of the pics above were considered no-no's for the size of the tile. I agree with the pattern looking odd, like it goes one direction in one row and then different in another row. Oddly, I do have all of the arrows on the bottom of the tiles pointing in the same direction. I will have to mix/match like a puzzle to see what look best.
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Unread 11-03-2018, 02:12 PM   #29
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Hi, James.

While I generally randomly rotate simple repeating tile patterns to prevent them from looking too mechanical...and generally match the grain direction of natural stone to give it direction and flow....I don’t know what to make of your tiles. They vary in both pattern and shade so heavily that my design eye doesn’t want to deal with such extremes.

I think I’d physically lay out every last tile in an adjacent room and experiment with positions until either you guys were pleased with the layout or rejected it altogether.

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Unread 11-10-2018, 06:10 PM   #30
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Well, the wife threw me a curve ball and says she now likes this selection better. It is marble though. Pro's/cons of 12" x 12" marble floor installation?
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