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Unread 04-18-2020, 11:58 PM   #46
patrick_here
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I think it's just about 30% slower or so but not absolutely certain of it.

I'm wondering ...is it the case that a single porcelain tile can have areas that are harder than other areas? In any case perhaps the variance could be related to other factors ...such as the way the bit tends to angle one way or the other in the bore ...etc.

I notice that some of these small coring bits are described as having a "brazed diamond edge". Is that better or worse than the "electroplate" type? (or it just another name for electroplating?)
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Unread 04-19-2020, 12:25 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick_here
I think it's just about 30% slower or so but not absolutely certain of it.
That's normal wear. The individual diamond particles are less pointy and more rounded than when they were new.


Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick_here
I'm wondering ...is it the case that a single porcelain tile can have areas that are harder than other areas?
The tile will be uniform.


Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick_here
I notice that some of these small coring bits are described as having a "brazed diamond edge". Is that better or worse than the "electroplate" type? (or it just another name for electroplating?)
Different processes to essentially adhere diamond bits to the surface. But for practical purposes, you're not going to notice much difference.

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Unread 04-19-2020, 03:49 AM   #48
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It's possible you'll still have to square up those corners after you drill the holes. A good grinder and blade may be needed to do that. It wouldn't be good to have the tile break after spending so much time drilling.
Does your diamond blade have a smooth edge like this one?

This is the blade I use for cutting porcelain tile.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Unread 04-19-2020, 07:52 AM   #49
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Tool Guy: Thanks very much for clarifying!

Davy:


Quote:
It's possible you'll still have to square up those corners after you drill the holes.
I don't understand; why might I have to square up those corners? (or are you just saying that in general, sometimes it happens that one has to square up corners in a situation like that?). Anyway, I think I could just hold the tile in my hand and do it; at lower speeds the vibration is definitely tolerable.

Quote:
It wouldn't be good to have the tile break after spending so much time drilling.
True!!

Quote:
Does your diamond blade have a smooth edge like this one?
Looking at those photos on the amazon site and never having seen the blade it self in the real world, I cannot tell what you mean by the blade having "a smooth edge".
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Unread 04-19-2020, 11:03 AM   #50
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Downward pressure question

Would anyone care to comment on how much downward pressure is the correct amount with a bit like this? I have been running it with just the weight of the drill itself which is about 5 lbs. Does that sound like a reasonable amount of pressure ...or should I be trying more? or less?

Thanks
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Unread 04-19-2020, 11:49 AM   #51
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Some blades have a smooth rim and some don't. I don't think the pic Cx posted has a smooth rim but might be segmented, I may be wrong. The smooth rim would have less vibration. Maybe you can post a pic of your blade. But even a continuous smooth rim can get out of round and worn out causing it to vibrate.

Hopefully you won't need to square up the corners but sometimes the receptacle won't go in with the corners rounded. Especially the GFCI receptacles.

This is a segmented blade. https://www.amazon.com/Masonry-Diamo...7319002&sr=8-4
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Unread 04-19-2020, 12:57 PM   #52
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Davy: Oh, okay, I think I see what you mean. Yes, the blade is not segmented ...it is smooth/continuous.
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Unread 04-20-2020, 10:15 AM   #53
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I was able to finish all 20 of the holes with the same original Milwaukee ("Electroplate") diamond bit and I'd say it remains in a similar condition (ie: it could probably do many more holes). By the end I had developed a technique that was giving me improved performance and I got some holes in 3 minutes. I believe there is a need to flush out the hole because the particles removed by the cutting process can stay down there in the bottom of the hole and cause nothing but problems even though it is essentially a wet process. The technique I developed was:

I added a little bit of pressure to the (5lb) weight of the drill ...ending up with a total pressure probably of something near 8lbs. Then I counted out 12 seconds and would then lift the bit so that water would have an opportunity to flush out the particles from the bottom of the hole for about a second or two; then continued for another 12 seconds again, etc. I also rocked the drill slightly off the perpendicular (by about a degree or two) occasionally to help in this flushing process.


Thanks again everyone for all the help.
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Unread 04-20-2020, 11:08 AM   #54
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I used those same Milwaukee bits for my bathroom project, in 3 different sizes, and had adopted a process very similar to yours, with similar results. I actually bought two of each size I needed, thinking I'd burn through them quickly.

Was pretty pleased with their performance. Perhaps not the best bit for a pro, but sufficient for a DIY'er.
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Unread 04-20-2020, 11:21 AM   #55
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Hi Dan...
I'm thinking that perhaps the process for "Electroplate" bits like these Milwaukee ones is different from the process for the "Sintered" ones that "Tool Guy KG" is talking about because these electroplate bits have just one layer of diamonds and, undoubtedly, there is randomness to the rate at which some of the diamonds initially break off (ie: 5 brand new bits drilling the same number of holes in the same material would look significantly different when examined under a microscope). Then you are left with a cutting surface that is not 100% diamonds ...because some of the diamonds have been lost. But with the sintered ones, the broken-off diamonds just uncover more diamonds so the cut-off particles are then just cut down finer and finer (instead of staying at the bottom of the hole an interfering with the effectiveness of the diamonds that remain on an "electroplate" bit).

That's my theory based on what I've experienced with this bit.

...probably would have been nice to have had the opportunity to get my hands on a sintered bit, but couldn't wait to have one shipped in this case (and besides they seem to be rather pricey).
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Unread 04-20-2020, 07:39 PM   #56
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Glad you experimented and got good results.

You know what’s funny is that there are places that sell sintered bits for nearly the same price as the electroplated/brazed.

Some variety are pretty specialized, as they are made for use in a wet grinder. The water flushes through the center of the bit to the cutting surface to help flush away the debris and keep everything cool. Provided you don’t press so hard as to crack the tile, you can grind through the tile quite a bit faster.

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Unread 04-21-2020, 08:44 AM   #57
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Quote:
Some variety are pretty specialized, ...water flushes through the center of the bit to the cutting surface
...interesting ...that makes sense !
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Unread 04-21-2020, 08:45 AM   #58
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Grout advice needed

Anyone care to help a newbie with some advice on Grout? I've never done it before and will be needing to do it either later today or tomorrow at the latest.

I had been planning on using Fusion Pro (in the hope of eliminating the need for sealing) but eliminated that after reading some of the horror stories. So now I'm thinking I would just go with some unsanded grout (assuming that I might end up scratching the surface of my tiles if I were to use sanded). My grout lines are 1/8".

Does it sound correct for me to be planning to use unsanded grout in this case? Any advice on specific grout to buy (brand/variety) ?

Otherwise, I think I "get it" on the general technique and the multiple steps but am very open to advice on any of this or advice on where to turn for a reliable overview (ie: youtube videos, or a good succinct written explanation) on the proper way to apply grout.
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Unread 04-21-2020, 07:09 PM   #59
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I like grout that doesn't dry to a different color than I expect. When I get to the end of a project, I don't need the grout to mar my hard work. I want something predictable.

If I want a cementitious grout, I'll use Laticrete's Permacolor or Custom Building Product's Prism. If I want epoxy, I'll use Laticrete's SpectraLOCK.

As far as the technique, the biggest thing to understand is to pack the grout in at something of an angle to the grout joint so that you force the grout all the way into the joint instead of getting a bit of an air lock. Once you have the grout packed into the joints so that they are completely full, rotate your clean grout float up on a 90 degree angle to the tile, then move it in a diagonal swipe across the joints. By running the float at a 90 degree angle, you'll have maximum "squeegee effect" to pull off excess grout. This makes it easier to end up with consistently full joints. And by running the float on a diagonal to the joint, the edge of the float doesn't "dig into" the joint and remove too much grout. After you've done this, you wait for it to firm up (so that you can slightly deform your fingertip pad when pressing softly on the joint), and then proceed to clean. Run a clean, well-wrung out sponge in small circles on the tile. This will loosen the excess grout. Make sure to keep the sponge flat. After that, wring out the sponge and run it on a diagonal for 2 lineal feet. Flip to the clean side and make another pass 6" over. Repeat.

Do realize that single-component/urethane grouts are worked differently and they are basically cleaned up right after spreading.


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Unread 04-21-2020, 08:00 PM   #60
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I'd use a sanded grout, Do a test board if you're worried about scratching the tiles. Most likely you won't. The grouts Bubba mentioned are my two favorites.
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