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Unread 03-10-2022, 11:30 PM   #1
Snets
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Tub Surround

I started a remodel for a former co-worker a few weeks ago. This 5X8 bathroom is a mess, from a framing perspective. The framing is 61" wide where a 60" tub should reside. One wall has two layers of 1/2" sheetrock to compensate.

The old tub surround was a mud bed. New tub surround is Kerdi Board. We installed the tub a couple of weeks ago. It has a thin tub flange, thin enough to allow the Kerdi Board to overlap the flange and set 1/4" above the tub deck, on two sides, where it abuts the studs, after furring the studs to a flat condition. The third side (end of tub) is basically flush with the Kerdi Board so the Kerdi Board sits on top of the flange. I cannot fur it out any more without adding another layer of drywall to that wall

This appears to meet the two installation methods prescribed for tub flanges by Schluter. I assume it is OK to mix those two methods on one tub.

Both methods prescribe Kerdi fix, Kerdi Band and thin-set mortar. Seems the gap between the tub deck and the lower end of the Kerdi board is the only difference.

Your thoughts?
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Unread 03-11-2022, 09:08 AM   #2
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My thought is to not even think about it, John. Though 1/4" is a little wide, use KF where the foam board is 1/4" above tub deck (maybe insert some foam backer rod first), and band + Fix on the other end.
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Unread 03-12-2022, 01:00 AM   #3
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Dan, the Schluter installation video calls out the 1/4" gap for backer that is proud of the tub flange, and can overlap the flange - which is why I set it at 1/4". They say fill that with KF, and squish it together with the thin-set under the Kerdi Band.

I am with you on not worrying about it, Either way, Kerdi band is flush with the tub deck, and either affixed to the flange with KF, OR KF crammed into the 1/4" gap....and everything is sealed to the tub. In my mind, it matters not.

Appreciate your thoughts on not thinking about it!
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Unread 03-16-2022, 09:13 PM   #4
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Baseboard to tub-leg Intersection

Thinking ahead nine steps here. I have relatively thin tiles (subway) coming down the tub "leg" to the floor. (same plane as baseboard) This is where the baseboard for the rest of the floor will start.

Baseboard is obviously thicker than a subway tile. What's the best way to proceed here?

1) Run the tile leg to the floor and abut the baseboard to begin at the tile edge with a flush return on the baseboard?

2) Run the baseboard to the tub and tile down to it?

I need ideas here.
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Unread 03-17-2022, 07:56 AM   #5
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Are you using a bull nose to finish the ends of the subway tile, John?

If so, you might propose using a combination of the subway tile and matching BN to create the baseboard.

If not using a BN, you could still use the subway to create the baseboard and just finish the vertical and horizontal edges with a profile trim.
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Unread 03-17-2022, 08:20 PM   #6
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I'd run the tile legs down the side of the tub and butt the baseboard into it. You don't want the wood of the baseboard to touch the tub otherwise it kind of defeats the purpose of having the tile leg.

For bathrooms, it's nice to have real wood for base rather than mdf. The mdf swells and gets ugly when exposed to moisture.
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Unread 03-17-2022, 10:53 PM   #7
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I was originally thinking I was going to use a thicker, colonial base, but I was there today and after looking at the rest of the condo, I think I will use a plain, 3/8"-ish baseboard. It will match better and not be too much thicker than the tile.
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Unread 03-19-2022, 10:34 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Mountain
For bathrooms, it's nice to have real wood for base rather than mdf. The mdf swells and gets ugly when exposed to moisture.
Hey John, I agree completely regarding MDF. It's barely usable in dry areas and if you happen to get any wear and tear on it it's not fun to refinish.

If you are going with a pretty basic molding profile Lowes carries a line of PVC moldings that are well suited to moist areas.

Gone are the days of readily available finger jointed pine moldings. At times I've even resorted to buying poplar and milling my own.
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Unread 03-20-2022, 09:47 PM   #9
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Definitely will steer away from MDF. I think I can find some real wood, 3/8" thick baseboard somewhere around here.
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Unread 03-21-2022, 08:09 PM   #10
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Arrived at my friend's condo today to start the seams and fasteners. Found that he picked up a bag of "Versaset" instead of Versabond. Failed to get a cart at HD so I slung the bag of Versabond over my shoulder and headed to the checkout. At about five steps from the shelf, the bag self-destructed. That was fun.

Got all of the seams and fasteners waterproofed and began setting the 3X6 subway tiles on the back wall. Super happy that these tiles cut nicely on my tile cutter/snapper, that is going to save a lot of time and mess - not a lot of room for a tile saw, upstairs, etc.

Set a level on top of the first course which I spaced with spacers 1/8" above the tub deck. Well go figure, there is a 1/4" dip in the center of the tub deck across the back wall. Not happy, and, not sure the best way to address this. I removed the tiles and cleaned the mortar off of the Kerdi.

Should I:

1) Just simply set the tiles on a flat line, leaving a 1/8" to 3/8" to 1/8" gap to caulk along the back wall below the tiles?

OR

2) Cut all 11 tiles in the first course to match the dip in the tub deck?

OR

3) Someone has an idea I have not considered....

Not going back for a couple days so have some time to think about it. Although I have not cut a tile on my saw yet, they are glazed ceramic, pretty easy to cut compared to porcelain or glass, I anticipate.

I suppose I could calculate the angle, it's 1/4" over 29-3/8", and make a jig for the saw....
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Unread 03-21-2022, 08:17 PM   #11
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Sometimes it's just corners of the tub that are high and you might get away with only cutting the end tiles. But if it's a steady and consistent dip then you'll probably have to cut them all.

If that's the case, I'd probably just start with a ledger board and get going and then save the bottom row cuts for when you have a saw set up.

Make sure to figure your ledger off the low, middle part of the tub and not the high corners.
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Unread 03-21-2022, 08:29 PM   #12
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I did not check the actual tub deck. that is the first thing I will do when I go back. I actually set two courses so that's a lot of spacers and tile to be sure it's NOT just the corners.

Thank you for that info! This is my first tub. And it's gotta be right.
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Unread 03-22-2022, 10:04 AM   #13
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John, don't forget about the left and right radiuses/radii at the front of the tub. You might consider using less than full tiles for the first row so that you can incorporate those radii into the first row.
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Unread 03-22-2022, 06:58 PM   #14
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Excellent point, Dan. I had not considered that and my tub leg is just the vertical bullnose; so it's either that, or a little, radiused triangle. Hmm.
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Unread 03-22-2022, 07:03 PM   #15
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You can also just radius the the next tile down.

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