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Unread 03-27-2015, 05:12 PM   #91
Motordoctor
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It's like the never ending story. Now "they' have decided that tiling the hallway into the bedrooms from the kitchen would be nice. So time to rip up some more floor and put down the plywood/CBU. At least I'm getting faster at it
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Unread 03-29-2015, 07:59 AM   #92
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So the drywall guy is supposed to finish it off today so I need to get cracking on the tile job. The floor is dirty now, any reason I can't just mop it with clean water after I sweep it and vacuum?
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Unread 03-29-2015, 08:25 AM   #93
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Vaccuum the living daylights out of it with a fuzzy attachment to get the mechanical abrasion, then perhaps a damp sponging to see if you get any more up.
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Unread 03-30-2015, 06:54 PM   #94
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Tile layout advice. Have to tile across a floor furnace vent. Either I can center one tile over the vent which will leave me with a 6" wide tile against the wall or lay the tiles offset a half a tile (9") from the room centerline which will require cutting two tiles to expose the vent. 18x18 tiles and the vent will be 4x14.

One other question? I got a 4" Makita diamond cutting blade for the angle grinder. When cutting ceramic tile for the vent hole, better to do it dry or have somebody spraying some water on it while I hack it out.

Thanks
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Unread 03-30-2015, 07:03 PM   #95
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Dan,

You do realize you're asking a bunch of OCD perfectionist craftspeople who enjoy a good challenge, right ?

Have you seen this thread ?

2 tiles will be easier to create than 1 tile, but 1 tile will look much nicer.
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Unread 03-30-2015, 07:50 PM   #96
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If the OCD kicks in too much I just have to think this: It's been three months and I still haven't laid a single tile down. Now work is picking up and it's on the back burner. I can only work on it on my off days. The construction guys were supposed to finish it (the wall) on Sunday but of course they didn't show. Shot that whole day because I didn't want to be in their way. When the wife finally got in touch with them, as usual, the excuse river was flowing. I understand why they didn't show but it would have been nice for them to call and say they couldn't make it. After the wife got done chewing them a new anal orifice I guess I'm finishing the wall. If I had any brains I would have hired this one out but at the time I had more time than money.
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Unread 03-31-2015, 02:59 PM   #97
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So now it's time to rip up the floor in the hallway and add more tile. The subfloor is the diagonal planks style. Should I take it down to the joists and replace it with two layers of plywood? The total height needs to be 1.5" with the CBU to match the kitchen. If I take it to the joists, I'm thinking 3/4" ply subfloor with 1/2" underlayment with the CBU on top of that. That particular section of floor is squeaky/creaky so this will give me a chance to straighten that out. Either that or just screw the existing subfloor down and put the plywood/CBU on top of that. It's a weird hallway, about 10 ft long with 5 doorways (2 bedroom/closet/bathroom/basement) as well as the entrance to the kitchen/living room. Would a 3/4" plank laid diagonally to the joists be as good as the plywood? With all the door entrances, going to be a little tricky measuring/cutting to fit. Will look like the thread with the tricky cuts in it, except in wood.
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Unread 03-31-2015, 03:10 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motordoctor View Post
The construction guys were supposed to finish it (the wall) on Sunday but of course they didn't show.
No one likes this comment, especially cx (sorry!)... I say that getting a contractor to simply show up is half the battle! I should go into the business and just show up on time--doing work is optional.
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Unread 04-01-2015, 04:34 PM   #99
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Badmouthing contractors, especially on a site run by them isn't a good idea. Like calling a cop a #$%$%^ while he's holding your license. I wasn't badmouthing contractors, just the idiots my wife hired. They aren't even licensed. My issue was them not calling to say they weren't coming. That's common courtesy. If I promise something out and can't deliver, I call the customer and let them know. Sometimes they're understanding, sometimes they don't like it and throw a tantrum. Either way, I did what I could do. Things happen that slow you down and you can't recover so somebody is going to lose. That's just life in general.
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Unread 04-01-2015, 04:51 PM   #100
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CX had no problem with that comment at all, Jason.

CX gets very short tempered when his subs don't show up for work when scheduled and don't bother to call to say they won't. It's a very valid, and a an all too common, complaint and Dan made his in quite acceptable terms.

I'm all in favor of being reminded that contractors of any type should display decent manners, too.
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Unread 04-02-2015, 05:23 PM   #101
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I now have a hallway that has to come down to the joists and be built back up. Need a final height of 1.5" so I could do that a couple of ways. In the kitchen it's 3/4" planks with 1/2" plywood and CBU on that. For the hallway, I could go with 2 5/8" sheets and the CBU or one 3/4" and one 1/2" plywood with the CBU. Any advantage either way?

Since we're going into month 4 on this renovation project, I have an odd question.
Is there a problem if I wanted to at least put down about 5 rows of tiles in the kitchen. I'm getting antsy and want to get cracking on this job. I figure if I can put all the full tiles down, that will give me a better idea of how the hallway will go. I can cover them with Masonite after the mortar sets so that will keep the debris out of the grout joints. Thanks in advance.
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Unread 04-02-2015, 06:25 PM   #102
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1. I would always opt for the nominal 3/4" plywood as my first layer, but the two layers of 5/8ths" would also be acceptable.

2. I wouldn't recommend that. Ungrouted floor tile installations without grout are still more vulnerable than grouted and cured floors.

When protecting finished hard-surface floors in construction areas I like to first cover them with builders' paper and then with Masonite with the seams of the Masonite all well taped.

You should be able to determine your layout by dry laying some of your tiles to figger out what pattern Mrs. Dan wants and then mark the layout on the subfloor in whatever rooms and hallways are to be tiled. Fully bonding some of the tiles in one area shouldn't really make any difference in your creating a final layout.

But you can do all that if you wanna on accounta it's your house and your tile, eh?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 04-10-2015, 05:25 PM   #103
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I'm planning on ripping up the subfloor down to the joists. Have one high plank where two joists overlap so I'm either going to shim up the low ones or shave down the high one. The question is this: Since I'm putting down 3/4" B-C exterior plywood as the subfloor, probably going to put some blocking between the joists to stiffen it up a little. For blocking material, are 2x4s OK or should I get 2x8s (same as the joists. Should the blocking be laid @ 90 degrees to joist or would 45 be OK? Reason is more support under the ply on a 45. The subfloor is going to be 4 pieces of 2'x5' ply, easier to get it in that way because of all the special cutouts to fit around the door openings. Thanks
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Unread 04-10-2015, 05:38 PM   #104
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I doubt blocking is going to help you much. It doesn't hurt, but may not help at all. The only blocking you should need would be at the perimeter of the room where the plywood is not supported.
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Unread 04-10-2015, 05:49 PM   #105
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The ends of the plywood won't fall on a joist so it's there to support the ends. Seems like a good idea to me but I only know enough to be dangerous
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