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Unread 03-27-2008, 02:07 PM   #1
AndrewC
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Cutting curves in 12 x 12 floor tile.

I need to cut some soft curves using 12 x 12 floor tiles. My question: Are there diamond sabre saw blades available? I've been looking around and I can't findany.

Thank you
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Unread 03-27-2008, 02:13 PM   #2
DC_INC
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Well it depends where these cuts will be and how visible they will be.

Basically you have three options which progressively get to be more of a p.i.a.

1. 4" angle grinder with diamond wheel blade
2. Rotozip with carbide ceramic blades
3. Coping saw with carbide blade

I'm sure there are more options but these are likely the most used. If you are looking for a finished look I would go with the rotozip but be forewarned, the bits are about $20/per and dont last all that long especially when through porcelain.

Hope this helps.
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Unread 03-27-2008, 02:22 PM   #3
AndrewC
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Cutting curves

Thank you Dave, I have all 3 items you mentioned. The cuts will be visable. I'll use the rotozip like you mentioned. I thought maybe there were some diamond sabre blades out there.

Thanks again
Andrew
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Unread 03-27-2008, 02:51 PM   #4
Rd Tile
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Use an angle grinder with diamond blade, then smooth or bevel the edge with a grinder with sanding & polishing pads.
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Unread 03-27-2008, 05:40 PM   #5
AndrewC
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Curved tile

Thank you Ritchie. I have to look into the sanding wheel for the grinder sounds like a good idea to keep in mind. I just ordered a RotoZip model # RZ20-4300 that has a "D" handle on it which in a way is like a saber saw giving you more control over your cuts.

Thank you for your help
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Unread 03-27-2008, 07:14 PM   #6
Scottish Tile and Stone
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The last one I did, I was fortunate enough to set the tiles, trace the arch, and cut and grind in place..
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Unread 03-28-2008, 11:52 AM   #7
keastman
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Last I knew rotozip didn't have any blades to cut floor tile, only softer wall tile. It is a carbide bit and dulls rapidly in floor tile, especially ceramic. Is there a newer one available now, or are you talking about the diamond disk atachments for rotozip?
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Unread 03-28-2008, 12:17 PM   #8
AndrewC
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RotoZip

The Roto zip I'm getting is a fairly new model RZ20-4300 goes for about $160. It uses a RZXB-FT1 Floor Tile X-bit which is made up of 2.5 carats industrial diamonds, 5/32 dia and cuts floor tile up to 1/2' thick. These bits go for approx $28 and supposedly are good for cutting 13 liniar feet of floor tile.

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Unread 03-28-2008, 01:04 PM   #9
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You'll be able to do it with the Rotozip. Just buy a few extra tile bits. They're pretty cheap anyway.

The hardest part will be controlling the rotozip. It's not very stable and it's not designed for precise work like a router might be.

So, definitely cut yr curves on plywood first (appropriately sized to acct for the width of the rotozip base.

IMHO, yr better off using an angle grinder. The heft of the a.g. makes it easier to navigate the curves. Also, it's easy to clean up curves with the a.g. If you try to clean up curves with the rzip, the bit'll skid along the edge and could even crack the tile.

Just my 2c.
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Unread 03-28-2008, 01:28 PM   #10
AndrewC
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RotoZip

Thank you Shawn for your useful information. The RotoZip I'm getting has a "D" handle on it, hopefully it should give more control on cutting curves. The old hand held one I had I agree it's hard cutting precise cuts with it.

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Unread 03-28-2008, 01:31 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rd Tile
Use an angle grinder with diamond blade, then smooth or bevel the edge with a grinder with sanding & polishing pads.
What Richie said. You can also use an orbital sander to finish off those edges, too, unless you're needing to fabricate the whole edge and body of the tile.

What kind of floor tile? Porcelain, ceramic, stone?

What part of the cut(s) will be visible? Top only or body of tile, too?

The Roto-Zip sounds like a pain in the arse. Although that set-up might work well for hole cuts (I dunno), it doesn't appear that the bit you mentioned is designed to accomplish what you're wanting to do. If it does work, I think it will cut slow, you will be have to cut all the way through the tile and possibly wander off your mark.

A grinder with a diamond blade allows you to make several passes through the tile, a quick tap (depending on the material ) on the corner of the tile and the unwanted part of the tile breaks away, leaving you with some clean up/finishing on the piece you want to install.
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Unread 03-28-2008, 06:56 PM   #12
AndrewC
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Curve Tile.

Thank you for your input Jonathan. I'm cutting ceramic floor tile. What I'm trying to do is tile around a 24" oval base toilet bowl which I had installed 4 months ago before I decided to retile my bathroom.

To be honest my really best & only option is to have my plumber reset the toilet bowl after I tile under it. Rather than try to tile around the base of the bowl. I'm a furniture and cabinet maker, with wood I'm sure I can do it but with tile it's a differant ballgame.

I thank all you guys that responded to my initial question.

Andrew
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Unread 03-28-2008, 07:31 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewC
What I'm trying to do is tile around a 24" oval base toilet bowl which I had installed 4 months ago before I decided to retile my bathroom. To be honest my really best & only option is to have my plumber reset the toilet bowl after I tile under it
.

Ahhhh, most definitely pull that flusher and tile to the waste. You'll still get to practice your curve cuts, sight unseen.
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Unread 03-28-2008, 08:02 PM   #14
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Woah...Andrew....seriously do yourself a favor, save yourself a few gray hairs and a bunch of rotozip blades. They will snap like wet pine if they're already installed.

Best bet - take up the toilet - retile - reset toilet.

Best and only option IMHO
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Unread 03-28-2008, 08:53 PM   #15
Bellsfloors
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Andrew, I second what Dave just told you. It is much easier pulling and resetting a toilet then it is cutting tile around it. Plus if you ever change out the toilet for some reason then you are already set.

As to cutting curves in Tile it is much easier, faster, cleaner and cheaper to cut with a 4" angle grinder with dry cutting tile blade. Believe me, I own both the grinders and the RotoZip with the New Tile Bit. Angle Grinder beats the RotoZip hands down.

Check out my link below and you will see some curves and holes that were cut with an angle grinder.

Bank project with curves
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