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Unread 06-06-2022, 01:23 PM   #1
Shady at Best
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Schluter Rondec Pvc Versus Aluminum?

Has anyone used the pvc rondec in a shower or other applications? My current job is in need of an edge trim for the shower walls, top of shower curb, around the niche, across the top of the wainscot, and around the top and sides of the countertop backsplash. I purchased the pvc rondec and used it on the backsplash and I am not impressed. It looks cheap. Keep in mind it was approved by the customer. Part of the problem is that i am not super excited about the design/layout so i feel that nothing will look great to me. But thats just me.
I am thinking that I should go with aluminum. I can picture someone kicking the pvc rondec at the curb and breaking it.

Another question. I am trying to tie in 2 totally different tiles from the shower wall to the wainscoting. The shower walls are this blue/green tile and the wainscot is white. The outside edge of both will have rondec and will use an inside corner at the vertical shower wall to horizontal wainscot connection. Here is my issue. What should I do for the 3-4 feet of vertical edge where the 2 totally different tiles meet up. I am thinking that I could use Schluter Jolly for this section. It would have the blue shower wall tile on one side and the white wainscot on the other so all that would be visible is the very top edge of the jolly. I think that will work.
Any other suggestions?

Since we are on the subject. Is it pronounced wayne scott, waynes cote, waynes cot, etc? I hear it pronounced differently all the time. And who gave it the name?
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Unread 06-06-2022, 05:57 PM   #2
wiz02
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I have been lurking and learning for quite a while on the forum, and while I am not qualified to give tile advice, I can provide help with the etymology of words. Here's one link about wainscoting including a pronunciation guide.

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/wainscot


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Unread 06-06-2022, 08:07 PM   #3
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I prefer the metal trim (but I wished it cut as easily as the PVC )
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Unread 06-06-2022, 11:02 PM   #4
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I would rather have the metal trim as well. It looks much better.

I'd save the PVC for some project less.... visible.
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Unread 06-07-2022, 01:18 PM   #5
Shady at Best
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Thanks for the replies and thanks Wiz for the wainscot info. I think my brain gets hung up on the word being the name of 2 dudes and it doesn't make sense. But when I look at it from my middle English point of view I see that it's derived from words meaning wagon partition.

I agree that the metal trim is the best choice and will go this route. But overall I dislike these trims and blame Floors and Decor for this. Customers seem almost proud that they are buying tile from this place. As if it's high end and fancy. I have yet to have a customer pick a tile from f&d that has matching bullnose, quarter round, etc.

Next related question. This shower will have very large tile on the walls. I usually run my shower curb tile under the wall tile. It feels more water tight to me. But i am concerned about cutting a precise notch out of this huge tile so that it will slide down over the shower curb. I feel like the tile will be hard to manage and don't want to waste 3 tiles on mis-cuts.
What are the pros and cons of tucking the curb tile under the wall tile and the opposite?
Do you all recommend any special tools for working with very large format tile? Should I be using a 4-5" angle grinder with certain bits/ wheels?

Thanks for the advice.


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Unread 06-07-2022, 05:14 PM   #6
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Travis, Seem like designers choice. I used granite for curb top and inserted it against the wall tiles with 1/8 gap each side for sealant.

How big are you talking about. I used standard tools for 1x2’ porcelain tiles; primary difference was mixing the thin-set a bit loose to make it easier to set the tiles and align edge with adjacent tiles.
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Unread 06-07-2022, 10:24 PM   #7
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Back to the rondec. I think that we have talked about this before. Have any of you used the 2 legged rondec corners? A dude at the local tile store said that the installers don't like using them because they are hard to line up correctly. I would think that they would be easier to line up.
And what are you using to cut the rondec? I tried a 7.25" electric miter saw with a Diablo aluminum blade and had limited success. I feel like the saw doesn't spin fast enough and wants to grab the material. And yes, I have tried cutting through very slowly.
Do any of you prefer cutting it at a 45 degree versus using the corner pieces?
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Unread 06-08-2022, 04:47 AM   #8
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I cut 45 versus the corner pieces. For cutting aluminum trim I use old wood carbide blades oriented so blades teeth are backwards and take slow cut. Keep the blade from grabbing the soft metal. Wear safety glasses, the chip can really fly.
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Unread 06-14-2022, 09:15 AM   #9
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Not sure why you would not want to cut this manually. Much safer, too. Aluminum cuts pretty easily.

I also want to point out that Schluter makes actual stainless steel trim. Very expensive, but never corrodes, never has any finish issues like aluminum.
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Unread 06-14-2022, 10:03 AM   #10
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I have use the corner peices with out problems but for the cost I prefer just cutting miters

I use this blade

Freud D1296N Diablo 12" 96 Tooth TCG Non-Ferrous Miter Saw Blade 1" Arbor https://a.co/d/bczHThj

Press the pieces hard up against the fence and keep pressure on it as you make the cut, and cut it slower than you would wood. If you don't the piece will move and you miter will be all jacked up
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Unread 06-15-2022, 08:14 AM   #11
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If you have 3 pieces meeting then the corner is the easiest way of handling it. Personally, I've tried the Diablo toothed blade and don't care for it. It can grab just like any other toothed blade.

Personally, I have the little Dewalt cordless chop saw with a 7-inch blade that I use for cutting this stuff.

I really like this blade for profiles https://www.lowes.com/pd/LENOX-Metal...ory/1000680523

edit: It seems to me they have a true non-ferrous version? Maybe not anymore
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