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Unread 11-24-2010, 01:00 PM   #1
JeffB99
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Jeff's Bathroom Remodeling Project

I am in the demolition stage of a bathroom remodel. The previous owner did the shower right...he put the 4x4 tiles over CBU.

What's the easiest way to pull this down? One wall backs up to another bathroom with a tiled wall so I am nervous about swinging away with a sledge. I don't want the vibration to do damage to that room. I thought my sawzall might cut it into manageable sections but that's not working either. My crowbar is mostly pull at the studs and not pulling the CBU away.

Do I need to remove tiles first, then the CBU? That could take awhile! I was hoping to remove tiles and CBU in one piece a section at a time. Tricks?? Thanks!!!!

--Jeff
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Unread 11-24-2010, 01:51 PM   #2
Davestone
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Depending on the tile sometimes you can tap away at the tile like a woodpecker and it will chip up and fall off the thinset,then you can get to the board to rip it down with a flatbar or crowbar.
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Unread 11-24-2010, 02:19 PM   #3
ceramictec
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Sawzall won't work too well if you cut a pipe or studs.

I cut the perimeter and then chip out a row and pull it out in panels.
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Unread 11-24-2010, 05:31 PM   #4
JeffB99
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Brian...that worked! THanks!!

--Jeff
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Unread 12-05-2010, 05:49 PM   #5
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Cracked Joist After Subfloor Removal? :-(

I'm still in the demolition phase of my bathroom renovation. Due to some water damage, I decided to do it right and start over with fresh subfloor before laying down CBU and then tile.

The subfloor was held down pretty well with adhesive and screws. I was able to pry it up but one of the joists lost about an inch off the top as it split off with the subfloor. (Pix attached)

It seems I have 2 options...but only #2 seems right to me. Option #1 would be to try and bring the damaged joist up to to the right height with a 1x1 glued, nailed, and shaped until its level. Option 2 would be to "sister" the damaged joist area with another held sidebyside with adhesive and carriage bolts. #2 seems alot easier since I wouldn't have to mess with shaving the top and bottom of a 1x1 to fit. The damaged area is about 4' long. This is an outside wall bathroom so one end of a sistered joist could rest on the foundation "ledge". The other end would be free...but bolted.

What would be right and allowable under code?

Thanks!!

--Jeff
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Unread 12-05-2010, 06:13 PM   #6
Davestone
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You could do number 2 and notch out the top to fit a 2x4 on top for subfloor and strength.The longer the sister boards the better.
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Unread 12-05-2010, 10:26 PM   #7
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Jeff, it's helpful if you'll keep all your project questions on one thread so folks can see the history and what's been previously asked and answered. We can give it a more generic title any time you'd like.

Sistering is the best option in my opinion. You can sister with just a 2x4, but I prefer nothing smaller than 2x6 for that kinda work so's to get more contact area for gluing and screwing it to the joist.

I would absolutely not recommend any sorta ripping of the existing joist.

Have you evaluated your existing joist structure to determine if it's suitable for tile before you go any further?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 12-06-2010, 02:08 PM   #8
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Kerdi Questions

Thanks all for the joist advice. As you can see from my joist picture, I have some water damaged wood to deal with.

But looking ahead, I have been waffling back 'n forth over the past month between Kerdi and a more traditional mud pan/liner setup for my 3x4 shower area. This week (and reading posts) has me leaning towards Kerdi. (I know what all of you will tell me!!) I paid my $9.95 for the Kerdi bible but I still have 2 basic questions....

--So how exactly does Kerdi seal tightly around the shower valves? I am very nervous about simple drywall as the Kerdi backer with moisture vapor/water run down getting behind some decorative valve cover and into the gypsum.

--I am thinking of installing 1 or more precast recessed soap niches similar to the pix below. Since the niche overlays the tile and the edge is silicone-ed all around, is the Kerdi simply X-cut and folded back into the open niche area behind?

Thanks!!!

--Jeff
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Unread 12-06-2010, 02:48 PM   #9
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I would kerdi the whole niche just as if you are going to tile it .water behind the tile would follow the kerdi and can damage the wall behind the nich and rot out your framing ,,not a good thing .
Kerdi has a gasket that can be used to seal around most shower valves that works nicely .
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Unread 12-09-2010, 03:09 PM   #10
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Simple Fernco Installation Questions

Sorry for the simple questions but I've never used Fernco couplings before.

For old ABS to new PVC DWV connections, should the pipe ends be touching? Does it matter? Does the neoprene sleeve need any type of sealing material between it and the pipe? Or just slide on, tighten, and forget?

Thanks!

--Jeff
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Unread 12-09-2010, 06:50 PM   #11
Muddman
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as an amateur plumber, I would say try to get as close a fit as possible, less possibility of things getting snagged. And no you don't need anything else, just make sure both surfaces are clean when you put it on.
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Unread 12-09-2010, 07:28 PM   #12
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Gregg is correct

Also clean any burrs from the edges of the pipes. Clean pipes are happy pipes
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Unread 12-09-2010, 08:57 PM   #13
Brian in San Diego
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Jeff,

I merged the two separate threads you started for this project. Please do not start new threads for each new topic on the same project. We have a "one project, one thread" policy on the JB forums.

Brian
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Last edited by Brian in San Diego; 12-09-2010 at 11:28 PM. Reason: Only two threads were for same project
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Unread 12-20-2010, 02:15 PM   #14
JeffB99
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Repairing Water Damaged Studs?

Due to too much office work, I've been away from my bathroom remodeling. But its time to get back to the important stuff!

The pic below is an exterior wall under a window. The middle marks the spot where the edge of the old fiberglass shower pan and sliding door were located. The shower was on the right side.

I could leave it alone and cover with drywall and Kerdi but the bottom of the middle stud and top of the sole plate are fairly rotted. The rest is just staining. I should probably do this right.

My initial Repair Option 1 is to cut the sole plate about 9" on either side (you can probably see my sawzall cut on the far left side) and studs up about 3" to cut out the damaged area, then double or triple the sole plate to meet the new lower end of the 3 studs. Option 2 would be to put in a single sole plate and add 3" of vertical stud pieces...maybe sandwiched in between and supported by 3 or 4' studs on either side.

I would think Repair Option 1 is the proper way to go rather than have my wall supported by tiny vertical blocks of wood! Am I correct???

Thanks!!

--Jeff
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Last edited by JeffB99; 12-20-2010 at 02:30 PM.
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Unread 01-02-2011, 11:20 AM   #15
JeffB99
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Kerdi Installation Sequence?

I have finished just about all of my prep work (new subfloor, water damage repair, etc) and am getting ready to drywall before installing Kerdi. But I'm abit confused....

Some here have posted that that sequence should be to drywall from the ceiling only down to the first course, do the wall kerdi, tiling, etc, THEN come back and do the mud floor and the short amount of wall drywalling and tiling. But the Schluter video shows sample bathroom drywalled to the floor first, install plastic sheeting on the floor, lathe, then mud.

Does the sequence really matter? I understand that if I mud first like the video, I would need to protect the floor and kerdi from damage. But doesn't the mud moisture soak into the bottom inch or 2 of the drywall??

Thanks!!

--Jeff
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