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Unread 10-08-2003, 12:48 PM   #1
tomR.
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Question Need drop size for wood trim piece on tile countertop.

I will be using a 3/4" X ? Maple wood trim piece for the front of my granite countertop. From this site the pros said to install the wood trim before I set my 12" Granite tiles. What size should the maple trim be 3/4" by what (Drop size)

I am using 1/2" Plwood Sub
3/4" Plywood Sub
? Cement Morter between Backerboard / Plywood
1/2" Backer Board - cement
? Cement Morter to set 3/8" x 12" Tiles
3/8" Granite tiles

What would the total front drop be? Not sure what the morter height is going to be.

Also do most people by the front wood trim piece and router the edge them self? Would it cost much to have the Maple cut to size and router the top edge of the wood. I don't have a table saw so the cut may not be to good!

Thanks, Tom
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Unread 10-08-2003, 01:45 PM   #2
bbcamp
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Hey, Tom! Figure on 1/8" for the thinset. If your tiles have a pronounced bevel, you may want to stop the wood where the grout level will be. Don't forget to caulk between the tiles and edging, not grout.

Ask your cabinet maker to provide the edging strip so he can finish it to match. If you are using existing cabinets, any cabinet maker will be glad to get a little of your budget for this very easy piece of unfinished millwork.

You didn't ask, "polyurethane." Your edging will take a beating.

BTW, you can use 1/4" backerboard, if you want.
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Unread 10-08-2003, 02:57 PM   #3
cx
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Hi, Tom, welcome.

I install my edge trim first because it's really easy to match the height with the mud base I install to set the tile on. A fella can adjust the mud thickness to make the tile surface exactly the right height for the edging.

Doing it with a CBU top (which I've never done), I'd want whatever plywood decking permanently installed, then stack pieces of the CBU and tile with thin spacers between to simulate the thinset as guages to align the top of my trim. I'd think you could get pretty close that way. Still closer might be to install the CBU first, also, but I like to drill one inch holes in the plywood to hold the bar clamps I use to glue the edge trim. Suppose you could still drill through the CBU, but maybe you'd wanna plug and fill the holes after. Can just screw some cleats to the top for the clamps, but you get a better angle with the holes.

Finish the edge trim (paint or stain and urethane like Bob says) before you set tile, paying attention to finishing the back part at least above the level of the CBU.

I usually trim with a profile that matches the cabinet doors if possible. Just looks nice. Have also just run a round-over bit along the tops after installation. I generally have the cabinet shop run some 1 3/4 - 2" pieces when they make the cabinets. Very easy for them, very easy for me, don't cost much. I like the trim to drop over the top of the cabinet face about a quarter inch. Whatever gives you the look you want. Without a table saw, I wouldn't recommend trying to make your own trim. Too easy to buy some ready-made trim from a large lumber yard or millwork supplier. Buy extra.
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Unread 10-08-2003, 05:36 PM   #4
John Bridge
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Welcome aboard, Tom. You're in capable hands.
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Unread 10-09-2003, 02:26 PM   #5
Tom R.
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Question What size spacer & Wood trim piece how thick?

Quote:
Originally posted by cx
Hi, Tom, welcome.

I install my edge trim first because it's really easy to match the height with the mud base I install to set the tile on. A fella can adjust the mud thickness to make the tile surface exactly the right height for the edging.

Doing it with a CBU top (which I've never done), I'd want whatever plywood decking permanently installed, then stack pieces of the CBU and tile with thin spacers between to simulate the thinset as guages to align the top of my trim. I'd think you could get pretty close that way. Still closer might be to install the CBU first, also, but I like to drill one inch holes in the plywood to hold the bar clamps I use to glue the edge trim. Suppose you could still drill through the CBU, but maybe you'd wanna plug and fill the holes after. Can just screw some cleats to the top for the clamps, but you get a better angle with the holes.

Finish the edge trim (paint or stain and urethane like Bob says) before you set tile, paying attention to finishing the back part at least above the level of the CBU.

I usually trim with a profile that matches the cabinet doors if possible. Just looks nice. Have also just run a round-over bit along the tops after installation. I generally have the cabinet shop run some 1 3/4 - 2" pieces when they make the cabinets. Very easy for them, very easy for me, don't cost much. I like the trim to drop over the top of the cabinet face about a quarter inch. Whatever gives you the look you want. Without a table saw, I wouldn't recommend trying to make your own trim. Too easy to buy some ready-made trim from a large lumber yard or millwork supplier. Buy extra.
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Unread 10-09-2003, 06:36 PM   #6
John Bridge
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3/4 in. thick. Whatever height you need to cover everything up. There's really no standard on this. This is one another member (Barb Freda) did.
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Unread 10-09-2003, 06:57 PM   #7
cx
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I generally use 3/4 inch material for the edge, Tom, but there are no rules. I did one with yellow pine that ended up about 1 1/4 thick, rabbeted to lap over the counter a little, just to get a particular look. You can do whatever you think is gonna look best to you in your situation. Don't think I have any photos of any of mine - they were pre-digital camera.

Spacers, if we're talking about getting the right height are whatever you think your thinset will be. I usually use a cople piece of #30 felt or thin cardboard. I think the usually stated 1/8 inch is more than I really end up with betwix tile and top. Ain't no law says you can't thinset a scrap of CBU to a piece of plywood, thinset a tile on top of that and measure it before you install that trim, eh? That ain't cheatin', that's good plannin'.
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