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Unread 09-09-2020, 01:08 PM   #1
worldknown
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Help deciding on which tub to order?

Hi everyone,
Back again. I am attempting a new project for which i will remodeling a new guest bathroom. I am deciding between the two different bathtubs:

1) https://www.americanstandard-us.com/...ht-drain-31856

or

2)https://americh.com/dropindetails.php?product_id=90


Attached is a picture of the current bathroom as well as the existing openings. From wall to wall is 64.5 inches, and the inner tub wall-to-wall opening is 58 inches.

Which tub would work best? Note: I want to install tile on the front of the tub and i believe both options allow me that freedom to do so.
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Unread 09-11-2020, 06:25 AM   #2
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Welcome back to the neighborhood, Mike,

Size wise, the "standard" tube/shower alcove width is 60 inches from stud to stud. Once you remove the existing tile and wall board you can determine the width you have. Often builders build "false" wall(s) in order to install a standard 60" tub and that looks like maybe what you have. Again, once you tear into it you'll be able to see what the framing looks like.

Both of those tubs will allow you to tile the apron, but only the first tub is meant as a direct replacement of a standard tube in a tub+shower alcove. You could probably make 2nd tub work but you'll have to pay really close attention to the water proofing since it does not have an integral tiling flange.

If I were doing this, and I will be soon, and disregarding the substantial price difference, I'd likely opt for the 1st tub because of the tiling flange.
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Unread 09-11-2020, 07:32 AM   #3
Tool Guy - Kg
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The first tub is the better option of the two.

The second tub was designed as a drop-in tub. And to use that in an alcove situation is bordering on problematic. Very often, the top shoulder of a ‘drop-in’ tub is flat, or even tapered down to the outside...meaning that water from the shower spray likes to pool on top up against the tiled walls, instead of flowing down into the tub. I really don’t like that manufacturers advertise that their drop-in tub can be used in an alcove. To make it ‘alcove ready’ (in their eyes), the manufacturer will sell a bulky, stick-on (double-sided sticky tape) flange that they call a tiling flange. But this flange seems to have been designed as a severe, last-second over-sight by someone who doesn’t understand the unyielding qualities of water and moisture management. It’s typically bulky, a little harder to bury in the wall, and is rarely waterproof without the additional step of siliconing it it in place. This is a drop-in tub and requires extra special attention if you’re going to install in an alcove.

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Last edited by Tool Guy - Kg; 09-20-2020 at 06:52 PM.
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Unread 09-14-2020, 01:08 AM   #4
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Thank you both very much!
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Unread 10-15-2020, 12:26 PM   #5
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Does this tub look structurally sound?

Looks good cuz they drilled the front wood into the ground but along the edging of the tub where they drilled the holes there are cracks.
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Unread 10-15-2020, 05:43 PM   #6
Tool Guy - Kg
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Anyone can make a mistake and crack a tiling flange once because they didn’t pre-drill/countersink for a flat-head screw. But it takes someone extra special to continue making the same mistake repeatedly. The cracks themselves aren’t terribly bad. Read the next paragraph for what is...

Please read the directions and I’m guessing that they require a ledge for the tub shoulders to be supported on. Very often, this would be a 2x4 fastened to the face of the studs for all three walls. I’m also guessing that this hasn’t been done. This is an important step not to miss, as the shoulder of the tub is relatively weak and somewhat flexible. You don’t want that flexing down (from pushing on it when lifting yourself from taking a bath) and cracking your caulk after the job is done. This support is somewhat challenging, as the bottom of the tub’s shoulder is usually uneven. Also, there’s usually stuff in the way to prevent the 2x4 from being continuous around all three walls. Also, it’s hard to accurately measure when neither the tub, nor the floor is perfectly level. The support should be just touching the underside of the tub shoulder. If there’s a gap, you’re in danger of the shoulder flexing, as mentioned earlier.

Also, please read the directions to see if they require the bottom belly of the tub to be supported with some sort of mortar. Most require this support. It kinda looks to me like the OSB under the tub is allowing a big air gap under there. If that’s true, that’s usually a mistake in the eyes of the manufacturer that will void the warranty.

P.S. It looks like you need more 2x4 support in your back left corner of the walls.

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Unread 10-16-2020, 07:42 AM   #7
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It's probably just the photo perspective but it looks like the whole back left corner of the tub is twisted up. Wouldn't hurt to check it with a level.
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