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Unread 11-03-2019, 08:09 AM   #46
ss3964spd
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It looks like that's a replacement window (no nailing fin), which is meant to fit inside an existing window frame, but it appears the old window frame was removed and with it it's seal to the exterior cladding. With no flashing or tape the only thing to seal it on the exterior side is caulk. Spray foam should have been used to seal it to the framing.

Yes, all the tile should have been set in mortar, which should cover something like 90% of the tile. IF they applied mortar to each individual tile instead of the wall then it's possible you'd not see mortar between the tiles, but that's a BIG if.
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Unread 11-03-2019, 08:14 AM   #47
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The house wood framing wasn't touched. As far as I know the old window was removed and this entire window was put in sitting in the wood frame.
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Unread 11-03-2019, 08:34 AM   #48
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I can't tell for certain, Butch, but given the daylight I believe they used a replacement window, without a nailing flange around the exterior perimeter of it. IF that's what they used, and if they did not remove the exterior siding, then the only exterior seal is caulk between the siding J channel and the window frame. It could be that's how the old window was installed, too, but that doesn't make it right.

It takes more time, and therefore expense, but the siding around the window should have been removed, a "new construction" window (nailing flange) installed, the flange then taped to the sheathing, siding reinstalled, J channel sealed to the window frame with caulk.
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Unread 11-03-2019, 08:41 AM   #49
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The ANSI Standard requirement for bonding mortar coverage on the back of tile in exterior or wet areas is an average contact area of 95 percent "with corners and edges fully supported."

You should be seeing the bonding mortar if looking in the empty grout joists.

That window installation is going to provide moisture related issues, Butch, either from the outside or the inside and from what I can gather from your description and photos it will be both. While you may not see the effects for a few years, the problems will have begun with the first rain on the outside or the first shower on the inside. The most unfortunate part of that is that it was entirely and very simply preventable, beginning with the window installation.

Actually, I suppose the most unfortunate part is that you paid someone to do that to you.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 11-03-2019, 06:15 PM   #50
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Why do I have this much water sitting in the drain? No water overflows by dumping water down it but it always sits this high. Wtf?
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Unread 11-03-2019, 06:46 PM   #51
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I can't tell where "this high" is in your photo, Bob. Can you give more hints?

The water level in your drain riser should be the same as the weir of your P-trap.
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Unread 11-03-2019, 06:53 PM   #52
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The water is sitting about 1/2 from the top in the white area in the drain
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Unread 11-03-2019, 06:59 PM   #53
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OK, I think I see the water level now. Were you around when the plumbing was roughed in for that drain? Seems to me the likely reason you see the water that high is simply because your drain plumbing is that high. And some of that might be why your shower drain is higher than all the rest of your shower floor.

Same guys did the drain as did that window?
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Unread 11-03-2019, 07:03 PM   #54
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Not following but ya. Same guy.
I wasn't home when it was done.
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Unread 11-03-2019, 07:24 PM   #55
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Possibly same attention to detail, was my point, Butch.

For some reason they had the drain plumbing set too high at the shower end to allow the shower drain to be set low enough to facilitate their shower floor construction. I expect the shower floor could have been raised a bit to compensate, but apparently they didn't think that was important even though it resulted in the drain being higher than the floor surrounding it.

The water level being that high in the drain is not in itself a problem so long as the drain functions properly. Which, of course, it actually doesn't because of its height, but apparently the water that does enter the drain exits properly and leaves the trap full of water as should be the case.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 11-03-2019, 08:29 PM   #56
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Since it is curbless I can only assume they needed to compensate for the height of the floor.
The drain itself has what seems to exit water properly.

The owner looked at the floor and I poured water on it and he said it drained fine. The couple of tiles that are dipped in is what is holding back some of the water but it eventually will evaporate and brushed it off as not being an issue.

I had a GC stop over and look at everything. He was concerned about the entire window installation in the frame and how it was improperly sealed. All the tile issues were also an issue. He said his tile guy would never have those tiles on the floor sunken in like that.
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Unread 11-04-2019, 11:05 AM   #57
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a depressing thread to follow. That window is a travesty. if you knew of the detail I put into my windows on my weather side of my house you would be amazed. I think flange less widows should be banned. Actually the flanges should be 2" but then they would get to much damage in transport. I used Vycor corners and so much flashing and urethane caulk . There are so many outs for the GC to claim if and when you complain about leaking issues. No house wrap. Windows not installed correctly? ETC. IF you want to live in this house more than 3 years i think the entire window shower interface needs a modern flashing done by a pro. this would require like a 5" band cut around the exterior of the window and using a new construction window with proper flashing.

Lots of modern flashing you
tubes. Start here
https://youtu.be/tAsI_0l3kWc
And here.
https://youtu.be/yHQYFKq91Wo
I used the corners but there are many flashing materials. I actually installed flashing first then caulked window in and then flashed over the window fin and used vycor ENvy sticky backed house wrapped.
Then Kerdi board should be installed on the window frame touching the vinyl window. Kerdi fix here and then caulk tile to window later.
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Last edited by Elkski; 11-04-2019 at 11:11 AM. Reason: you need to plan waterproofing like this is a ship at sea
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Unread 11-04-2019, 11:38 AM   #58
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The window came with detachable nailing flanges but I doubt they were used. I honestly have no idea how this window is installed. I doubt any siding or channel was removed. I doubt any type of flashing tape, caulking was used during the install.
All I know for sure was the stuck some silicon Zealand on the left side and on top. No spray foam insulation that I know of. Then it was tiled over while I want home.
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Unread 11-04-2019, 12:26 PM   #59
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Here is a pic of the inside of the window frame where it is tiled. You are looking through a grout joint and you can see the kerdi board is not touching the window frame.
He stated " I see kerdi board in there, it's waterproof" and this from the owner.
The is no thinset, no kerdi band, no kerdi fix sealing the board to the window frame. Nothing but air.
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Unread 11-04-2019, 12:42 PM   #60
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Unacceptable, IMO, and it casts major doubt on how the sill, which is even more critical than the sides, was treated.

I think you know what you need to do, Butch. Bummer.
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