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Unread 12-08-2020, 06:40 AM   #241
JWOrl
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I am planning to apply the redgard and start tiling the next day. I am getting all my layout planned in advance. I was not planning to pre-cut the tiles because I read you should wait to do that as you go.

I have read the redgard should not be "exposed" on a surface for more than 72 hours...will I run into a problem with the the thinset/tile adhering if it takes me several days to get this job done? (this is my first time tiling wall and I don't know exactly how long it will take me to get this done. I'm sure there will be some minor issues along the way).

Thanks!
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Unread 12-08-2020, 07:31 AM   #242
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Was pretty sure the 72 hour thing was related mostly to UV exposure but wasn't sure.

Am now though.

Protection
If tile or stone will not be set immediately after curing, protect the
membrane from rain, inclement weather and potential construction
traffic damage. If delays longer than 72 hours are expected, cover and
protect the membrane from extended direct sunlight (UV exposure).
Care should be taken to prevent the application from becoming soiled
or punctured during and after application.
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Unread 12-08-2020, 07:43 AM   #243
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thanks Dan.

Maybe I'll cover the two side walls with felt paper as I tile the middle one so they don't get contaminated.
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Unread 12-08-2020, 08:24 PM   #244
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I've been using some scrap pieces of hardie to practice using redgard on.

I tried using the 3/4 synthetic nap roller that custom recommends and I only got 6 mils, and it left a splotchy coat of uneven thicknesses, not a smooth coat. And worse, I only got 6 wet mils. Someone on here said not to go over it twice with the roller so I do not know how to get the required mils with a roller unless I'm missing something in technique.

I tried the trowel and that did leave a thicker coat but the surface was not completely smooth and probably the thicknesses weren't either - maybe I need to work on my technique.

I finally had success using a brush, I got 22 wet mils on the gauge on a single coat of RG, using several passes with the brush.

1) is it acceptable to use a brush for the entire wall?

2) what about brush marks that are left in the RG -- are they a problem? I am not clear yet on whether RG is a self-leveling product or not.

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Unread 12-08-2020, 10:04 PM   #245
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1. Yes.

2. No, so long as the shallow areas are sufficiently thick.

John, I've never seen anyone apply a sufficient coat of a liquid-applied direct bonded waterproofing membrane using the manufacturer's recommended paint roller as it's intended, i.e. with the roller turning. Used as more of a slightly turning squeegee, you can make it work some, but only in wide open flat areas. And when I say no one, I'm including manufacturers' reps during demonstrations.

The one method I've seen used that appeared pretty effective was to apply the material with a small (1/8th" or smaller) vee-notch trowel, let that dry completely, then cover it with another coat using the flat side of a trowel of drywall knife, filling the groves to the top of the peaks. Not terribly efficient, but it did make a smooth, thick coat.

For wet area walls, putting on the much thinner than recommended coats seems to make the walls sufficiently waterproof if you use enough coats, and the manufacturer's rep will tell you that's fine. But when they tell you to do a shower receptor with that product, I worry.

Thirty wet mills of a liquid membrane on a vertical surface in one coat is a bit of a unicorn, to my thinking. On a horizontal surface you might can do it, but you'll be flooding and squeegeeing more than rolling or brushing.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 12-09-2020, 05:38 AM   #246
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Thanks CX. I'm going to experiment with the v-notched trowel again and then just go with the brush if that doesn't work out.

I'm just so glad I tried this out on scrap first instead of going directly to the walls. That would have turned into a huge mess.

I had no idea how tricky this stuff is to work with. It certainly isn't like rolling smooth coats of paint as they portray in their video.
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Unread 12-11-2020, 09:34 AM   #247
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Question: Is it a good idea to pre-cut your tiles that will go in the inside corners (one wall at a time)? Or is it better to cut a single piece each time as you go along, per row? Thanks.
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Unread 12-11-2020, 09:50 AM   #248
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IMO "better" may not be the correct word. While cutting them all, or at least a bunch of them, at once will be more efficient time wise doing so won't necessarily result in a better outcome.

I think it depends more on ones skill level and confidence. I, being just a weekend hack, lack both so I prefer to cut them as I go.
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Unread 12-11-2020, 10:16 AM   #249
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Thanks Dan.

If you cut them as you go does that mean you have to do very small groupings of rows at a time, since the thinset seems to set up quickly once it's applied to the wall?
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Unread 12-11-2020, 10:47 AM   #250
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Yes, you really don't want the mortar to skin over before getting the tile set in it.

You could set several, or a whole bunch, of rows and just leave out the end pieces that need to be cut, and remove the mortar from the wall where those pieces will be. Then mix another batch, go cut a few pieces of tile, and install them buy either applying mortar to the wall or to the back of the tile.

I chose to set a row at a time and use a long level to make sure they were straight, which also allowed me to ensure the cut end pieces were also straight. Took a lot of time, natch, but was worth it to me.
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Unread 12-11-2020, 06:53 PM   #251
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OK thanks Dan.

Another question: if you do a an accent row (at eye level on the wall, for example), does that mean you do not tile one wall at a time--you tile all three bottom sections of the walls below the strip first and then the areas above where the strip goes, leaving a horizontal gap to place the strip in?

Also does using an accent tile mean you have to use a second ledger board to keep the subway that will be above it in place, before you install the accent?
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Unread 12-11-2020, 08:14 PM   #252
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I did pretty much exactly that. Started at the bottom accent row and made sure it was level with both a bubble level and laser level. Once that was set, built up from there on all three walls and kept grout lines even with spacers and used the levels to stay on track as I went up.
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I did the floor first and used heavy cardboard to protect it. Yeah, not the recommended route, but there’s lots of viable options.
If you want to leave the accent strip for last, make up a stick or some kind of template to act as a spacer. With an accent strip, I’d imagine even a 1/16 off would cause the grout spacing error to be noticeable. Check and recheck as you go.
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Unread 12-12-2020, 07:35 AM   #253
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thanks Jeff...beautiful shower!

I would rather put the accent strip in as I go rather than leaving the gap and put it in at the end, as that would eliminate the need for the ledger board.
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Unread 12-12-2020, 08:13 AM   #254
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If the accent tile is the same thickness as the field tile I'd do the same, no need for a second ledger.

My accent tile wasn't the same thickness, so I needed the row of field tile above the accent in order to screed the space for the accent to build it up to the necessary depth.
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Unread 12-12-2020, 02:32 PM   #255
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I like that dark gray paint in the room Dan...goes well with the tile.
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