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Unread 05-07-2018, 01:19 PM   #16
cx
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And you would be correct.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 05-07-2018, 01:54 PM   #17
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OP is in Florida. Sounds about right
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Unread 05-07-2018, 02:24 PM   #18
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shower stall

First of all: Remove the wood seat;the pan you use copper or membrane needs to contain fully a seat. I would advise copper but if membrane then so be it. If you want a solid seat as the wood there now indicates build it out of concrete block and then paint on water proofer and tile it.
Second: Remove the 2x4 threshold.Nail down a strip of tar paper and galvy wire the width of a common brick and set in one or two rows of brick to whatever height you want. If membrane pan bring the membrane up and over the brick using the good construction adhesive to firmly adhere membrane in and on top of brick threshold. When ready to mud the shower floor with dry pack cut a strip of cement board the height of inside the threshold to brick,coat with construction adhesive and dump in your mud. Form your floor pitching to the drain and attach top piece of threshold cement board with TEC super Flex or comparable thin set. Outside of brick threshold you can thinset and tile..Wood and water do not mix; you want to eliminate as much of it as reasonable and the masonry skills described above are basic.

Go to it,
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Unread 05-07-2018, 04:00 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bookie
Wood and water do not mix; you want to eliminate as much of it as reasonable and the masonry skills described above are basic.
Bookie has that part right, but there is absolutely no way water will try to mix with your wood threshold if your pan liner and wall waterproofing are correctly installed.

And no offense meant, Bookie, but there is absolutely no effective way to use CBU on a shower curb in a traditional mud/liner/mud shower receptor. None.

Judging by the copper recommendation I'm guessing Bookie is from somewhere in the Boston, Mass, area. Other than some places in NYC I don't think I've ever heard of a copper shower receptor recommended anywhere else in the country and I wouldn't recommend it for you. Not only do they rot out faster than PVC or CPE membranes, but there's no effective way to provide a pre-slope under them. Same with NYC's continued recommendation of lead pan liners.

However, with what you've currently got, I'd recommend you avoid a traditional receptor construction all together and use one of the direct bonded waterproofing membrane systems. My current favorite being USG's Durock Shower System, which you can purchase from Amazon for delivery to your doorstep. All you need is the membrane and the drain.
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Unread 05-07-2018, 06:44 PM   #20
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Shower kits

CX,
Thanks for the info. My problem is that my shower is 81" long, and the longest Durock kit is 60". I found a Kerdi kit that is 72", but still short of the required length. That is why I was planning for a traditional poured pan with a liner. If I'm missing something, please let me know.
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Unread 05-07-2018, 07:54 PM   #21
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I'm not a big fan of wood seats. I usually go ahead and install the pan liner as usual and then add a separate piece of liner behind the seat area and build it out of concrete blocks. That way it's all contained
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Unread 05-07-2018, 08:21 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CX post 5
All you need is the membrane and the drain.
You don't need anybody's kit, Ed. You make a properly sloped mud floor to fit exactly the size and shape of your shower floor and drain location and cover it and your walls and your bench with the sheet membrane.

Whatever you elect to do I would recommend you center that drain first.
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Unread 05-28-2018, 01:05 PM   #23
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Shower Niche

I am adding a custom shower niche, with 3 niches. They are all framed with 2x4s. The hardibacker is up on the walls.
Questions.
1. Does it matter what order I Backer the insides (bottom, top, left, right, back)? For drainage purposes, I was thinking bottom first. Then the back. Then the sides and top; which could then help hold the back in place.
2. The back adjoining wall is drywall/sheetrock (green board). How do I attach the back of the niche? Liquid nails? Thinset? Some sort of silicone?
3. Does it matter what order I tile the niche? (the back will be a mosaic, and the bot/top/sides will be tile to match the walls.

My waterproofing will be Redgard, after all Hardiebacker work is done.

Thanks.
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Unread 05-28-2018, 01:56 PM   #24
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Hi Ed,

Put the backer-board in the back first and then around the edges in any order you want. It makes no difference. I would glue the back pieces to the drywall with thinset.

On the can, get one that slips in over the finish. That's the easiest thing you can do. If your ceiling is lower than eight feet the light is supposed to be "vapor-proof."
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Unread 05-29-2018, 07:48 AM   #25
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Does the recessed shower light have to be wet rated/vapor proof/etc if you wire it into a GFCI/AFCI circuit?
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Unread 05-29-2018, 10:06 AM   #26
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What the NEC has to say about it

Quote:
Originally Posted by NEC 410.10(D)
Luminaires located within the actual outside dimension of the bathtub or shower to a height of 2.5 m (8 ft) vertically from the top of the bathtub rim or shower threshold shall be marked for damp locations, or marked for wet locations where subject to shower spray.
GFCI protection is neither required (unless by the luminaire manufacturer) nor provides any additional leniency. I believe for most can lights the damp/wet location rating is determined by the trim used rather than the can itself.

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Unread 05-29-2018, 10:25 AM   #27
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Had read the same thing Wayne, and I have to think the reason for the "wet" rated trim is to keep water out of contact with the electrical bits. Don't want anyone getting shocked while lathering up.

But having them on a GFCI/AFCI would provide the same safe guard, would it not?

Not that I'd win such a debate with the county inspectors.
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Unread 05-29-2018, 11:14 AM   #28
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It says what it says.

Perhaps another issue is that water + hot bulb = broken bulb = personal injury. So if it is subject to shower spray, it better be wet location rated, whether or not it is GFCI protected.

Or another issue could be that if it is not wet location rated but is subject to spray, it could corrode, develop a high resistance connection, and start a fire. AFCI won't do anything to prevent that.

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Unread 05-30-2018, 11:17 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wwhitney
GFCI protection is neither required (unless by the luminaire manufacturer) nor provides any additional leniency. I believe for most can lights the damp/wet location rating is determined by the trim used rather than the can itself.
THIS...

While some manufacturers make their lights rated for damp/wet locations with seals, others use unsealed covers (to protect from direct spray) and then require GFCI (found in the installation instructions) to get the damp/wet location rating.
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Unread 05-30-2018, 12:43 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph
others use unsealed covers (to protect from direct spray) and then require GFCI (found in the installation instructions) to get the damp/wet location rating
Interesting, I wasn't actually aware than any manufacturer did this, just that it was a possibility. Can you point me at an example?

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