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Unread 01-19-2020, 04:28 PM   #31
Dan White
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The tile I purchased was 12x24 and was at a close out price, which is why I bought it without too much fuss. Having looked it over in the garage it seems very uniform size-wise. I looked it up online and found that it is a rectified tile. I'm thinking the 1/16" grout lines should not be a problem.

CX thought cupping might be a problem because I originally wanted to stagger the tiles. Seems like these might be very flat as well, but if tile like this is normally stacked vertically I suppose I could go with that as well. Probably easier for me to get a good result.

I think I'm going to look into using those spacers that also maintain good consistency of tile height. Haven't used them before but maybe a good idea fr non pro's like me.
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Unread 01-19-2020, 04:56 PM   #32
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Not sure what you're reading, Dan. I've used a PLS 180 (and its earlier iteration) for many years and always found it adequate to my needs for anything I needed to do indoors in new construction or remodel. Setting cabinets, hanging trim, setting tile, and many, many miscellaneous functions.

It's advertised as accurate to 1/8th" in 30 feet, which, again, I find adequate. Don't know what your "5/16 tolerance" might mean. Never have seen that in conjunction with such devices.

Price seems to be about half what I remember paying for my first one.

As to your tile setting, you're just gonna need to check your in-hand tiles for adequate flatness before you decide on your offset spacing. The usual problem is diagonal warpage, which causes excessive lippage where the end of one tile meets the center of another. As for your 1/16th" spacing, that can be done with really well rectified tiles, but they'd need to be neigh onto perfect for me to even consider that joint width.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 01-19-2020, 07:53 PM   #33
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I didn't read your whole thread again, Dan but I wonder how flat the concrete blocks are you'll be setting against. Maybe this has been addressed.

Also, The MDF I was talking about is the 1x4 or 1x6 in the 10 ft lengths. Just wanted to make sure you weren't looking into the MDF trim made for casing or baseboard.
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Unread 01-20-2020, 07:45 AM   #34
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The accuracy thing has prevented me from up grading my lazer level (an old, non self leveling Dewalt), that and the thickness of the projected line. Still, probably no worse than my inexpensive 6.5' Empire bubble level. I should just get over it.

I used cheap MDF door/window casing for my ledgers but my longest length was 7'. Plenty straight, and I set it with the aforementioned 6.5' level and a nail gun. I set my rectified 12X24's on the ledger, and then set the level on top of the tiles, and used wedge spacers between the ledger and tile to ensure the first row was level and that all the tiles were touching the bottom of the level. I did each subsequent row the same way, 'cept for the ledger, natch.

I used a 1/16" joint, but my tiles were almost dead on size wise.
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Unread 01-20-2020, 08:49 PM   #35
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cx: there are tons of laser levels on the market will different levels of level, so to speak. The $80 Bosch tolerance is +-5/16" which is a lot to me. Your level at 1/8" seems to be as good as it gets unless you buy a ridiculously high priced unit. Looks like the units worth buying are in the mid $100's to $200's.

Davey: For the most part the blocks are pretty good. The top course is 1/2 blocks and some of them stick out a bit. Someone suggested I lay down a skim coat of thinset before doing the job... even out some of those spots first. Maybe 1/16" grout lines are not realistic on a wall that isn't perfect. Maybe 1/8" is doable.

ss: thanks for the clarification on the mdf. That's what I thought you meant anyway. Seems like my tiles are pretty identical, but now I'm afraid of the wall, lol. I think I'll skim coat it and try those "new" tile leveler gizmos to help deal with the block wall.
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Unread 02-05-2020, 05:05 PM   #36
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I'm looking to tile either this weekend or next. What would you recommend for a good temperature range for tiling? I'm in NJ and garage temps are in the 40's but could drop lower. The heater in the garage can maintain any temp I need. Should I keep it at least in the 50's for several days before tiling?

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Unread 02-05-2020, 05:31 PM   #37
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None of your tile installation products cares what the temperature has been in the area to be tiled, Dan. They care only what the temperature of everything (Ambient air, substrate, tile, mortar, grout, etc.) is at the time of installation and for at least 72 hours thereafter. Most requirements call for higher than 50 degrees F, but you wanna check the specifications for your mortar and grout.

The industry standard for temperature of the tile installer is usually 98.6 degrees, but we've seen a lot of "professional" installations that appear to have not necessarily complied with that one, either.

What kind of heater do you have in that garage?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 02-07-2020, 05:41 PM   #38
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cx: Yes, of course the temperature of the wall and materials is what I was getting at. I figure if I maintain the temperature for several days then that will give the tile and wall time to settle in at a good temperature. I'll take a look at the thinset specs. The 72 hour thing is good to know.

I have a ceiling mounted electric space heater with thermostat that is sized well enough to heat the small 2 car garage quite easily.
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Unread 02-07-2020, 07:12 PM   #39
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Electric heat is good. Some other types, such as kerosene or propane burners can have an effect on the curing mortars and grouts.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 02-17-2020, 12:16 PM   #40
Dan White
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Got about 60% done on the first wall when I ran out of thinset. My back told me to wait a few days before opening another bag. Went pretty well so far. I like these Raimondi 1/16" spacers.

Is there a trick to tiling the cut pieces below the ledger board (after removing it, of course). I'm familiar with how to measure odd angles near the wall for floor tiles but haven't done so on a wall yet. Is just tape measuring and cutting the best thing do do or is there another trick I don't know about?

BTW, the grout lines are vertical. The camera lens is distorting the image.

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Unread 02-17-2020, 01:17 PM   #41
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If your floor is reasonably flat and you intend to cut straight lines, you can just measure from the bottom of your existing tile to the floor at each end of the tile and transfer that to your bottom tile and draw a line between the marks.

If you need or want to follow a more complicated cut line on the bottom of the tiles, you'll need to scribe that line from the floor onto your tile.

In any case, you want to plan for a gap of at least 1/8th" between the tile and the floor.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 02-18-2020, 06:33 AM   #42
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Looks like you can get two cuts per full tile maybe even three. Put your tape measure away and have your pencil or marker ready. Take a tile and place the finished side against the existing wall in line with your vertical grout joints. Either space up from the floor your 3/16” (1/16 + 1/8 expansion along floor) and mark it tight to the bottom edge of the existing wall tile or keep it tight to the floor and mark the tile on each end 3/16ths lower than the existing. This is a way to scribe point to point and get a near perfect fit each and every time without the need for a tape measure.
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Unread 02-18-2020, 05:10 PM   #43
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@Cali: Thanks for the reply, but doesn't that cause a problem since the floor is sloping from left to right? In an extreme example suppose the floor is sloping down at a 45 degree angle so maybe I'm at 2" on the left and 10" on the right. If I put a tile on the floor up against the wall the grout lines won't match up because the tile won't be long enough since it is on a 45 degree slope.

I could do it the way I've done it for floor tiles but I'd have to add another ledger board. It would be like this: Nail an additional ledger board similar to the tile thickness on top of the existing one. Then rest a new tile to match up to an existing tile that is on the ledger. If I could get the height just right, I could also just screw in some screws to rest the tile on instead of adding a whole new ledger. Take a second tile and rest it on the floor like you said. Draw a line across the top of this tile onto the tile sitting on the ledger. This will become the cut piece.

Honestly, I think I've tried your method and it doesn't quite come out right, if I recall. I can do my method without too much extra trouble but I thought there might be another way. Measuring and cutting like cx said never seemed to get me a nice clean result, either, but I'm no pro.
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