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Old 08-02-2018, 08:17 PM   #1
thedudemn
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GoBoard shower pan (crazy idea)

I was planning on redoing a shower and thought about the shower pan.
So GoBoard foam boards are available to me at local retail store. I used GoBoard for a tub surround and really liked it - no dust, light, easy to cut and waterproof.

I was planning on going with a schluter or durock foam shower pan kit. Then I start thinking about a linear shower drain and thought about a mud pan. Linear foam pans are pretty expensive.

So I thought about using GoBoard as a foam pan with a linear drain. I wouldn't even need a mud pan.

I understand why GoBoard wouldn't work with a traditional drain because of the slope required in all directions from the drain. With a linear drain you have 1 or 2 slopes, therefore a straight foam board will work.

Let's say I use 2x4 wood and plywood to make a sloped pan. I have a table saw so cutting the wood with the proper slope should be easy. I attach the 1/4" GoBoard to the top, giving me a waterproof pan.

The hardest part seems to me is integrating the linear drain to the GoBoad foam. With a flanged linear drain it's fairly easy. Would the "divot method" work with a linear drain that doesn't have a flange or attached membrane fabric. The divot would I guess be more of a trench.

Technically I guess I could even use backerboard and waterproof that with either a sheet or liquid membrane as the base.

Besides being very non-traditional or lacking any warranty, how stupid is my idea.
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Old 08-02-2018, 08:43 PM   #2
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I try to reserve the word stupid for those occasions when someone does something that truly is stupid, Hue. In your case, I'd rather say I think your plan is misguided.

I could cite a number of things I think would go wrong with the plan, but I'd rather just point out that Johns Manville says the following on their website about the use of GoBoard:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johns Manville
In flooring applications, GoBoard is for Residential and Light Commercial use only and should not be used as a shower pan base
But you can certainly give it a try if you're so inclined.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 08-03-2018, 09:19 AM   #3
JerseyDIYguy
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Wedi makes foam board that can be used in floors. They also make linear drains that work with their own specialized foam shower bases. I imagine that with a little planning and work you could successfully waterproof a linear drain to a sheet of Wedi foam board laid on a slope.
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Old 08-03-2018, 10:13 AM   #4
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Watch on youtube how Sal DiBlasi creates a mud base for a linear drain. There being only one plane makes it easy to get the slope right.
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Old 08-03-2018, 05:03 PM   #5
thedudemn
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Ha. I was probably going with a mud pan anyways. I was thinking how a linear drain makes the mud pan easier to build. It's like a concrete form, set the perimeter to get the slope and screed.

Like for a barrier free shower, I've seen where they just slope the subfloor by either modifying the joists and cutting the plywood and placing it between the joists instead of on top.

I'm just annoyed that the foam pans for linear drains are much more expensive than regular drain pans. Hell, it probably uses less foam and is probably just as easy to make.

I can see why from a professional standpoint, no tile setter would try this for a client. But theoretically, why not, in a linear drain application, build a sloped plan using backerboard(foam, etc) and modern waterproofing tech. Wouldn't you save time?

I'm assuming Goboard doesn't want people using the sheets as a pan because either their coating can't handle it or they don't want people putting a regular 3 piece drain in and calling it a shower pan. Or they'll eventually add a shower pan to their product line and charge more for it.
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Old 08-03-2018, 05:31 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hue
I'm assuming Goboard doesn't want people using the sheets as a pan because...
Be careful with that concept, Hue. If you really wanna know why they make that recommendation, why not call and ask them? Maybe they'll just come right out and tell you.

What you'll find here on this website is folks who are gonna tell you the known correct way to do things. We don't pretend those are the only ways to to any particular project, those are just the ways known to work and endorsed by the industry and product manufacturers. You wanna try something different in your own home, I say go for it. But for the benefit of all the potential future visitors to the site, we're still gonna point out the correct products and procedures. Fair 'nuff?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 08-03-2018, 05:56 PM   #7
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Hue said, "I can see why from a professional standpoint, no tile setter would try this for a client". If you can see this then you see why we wouldn't advise you to do it this way. We will only advise you to do it like we would. I'm sorry we aren't saying what you want to hear.
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Old 08-18-2018, 03:09 PM   #8
thedudemn
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Anyone do anything like this?

So this popped up in my google search. Relying on screws to bend the cement board and hold the slope seems kinda risky.

https://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/me...pection-really
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Old 08-18-2018, 03:54 PM   #9
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Your link took me to a RIDGID forum where guys were complaining about shower pan rough-in inspections.

You're still trying to find an unorthodox method of shower receptor construction similar to your Go-Board plan?
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Old 08-18-2018, 04:23 PM   #10
thedudemn
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No, I was searching for inspection process and plumbing code in Minnesota.

Actually now that you mentioned it. I actually contacted on John Mansville, and they contacted me back. They said they've had some installers use it that way, and if I have any questions they can talk to one of their technical people. I guess they are coming out with a lineup of shower products as well (hopefully the competition will drive prices lower for competitors as well).

I've just never seen a shower constructed that way. I'm actually confused as how he was able to get a consistent slope especially at the perimeter.
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Old 08-18-2018, 04:37 PM   #11
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I knew a company that did the pans this way in Fla. 20+ years ago. They would cut the drain hole and score the back of the board from the corners to the drain. Used thinset set for a bond coat and set in mud.

Inspectors would turn on the valves in the showers, walk the house and when they were done if they werent draining well you failed. I worked in the same neighborhood, Weston Fl, and dont know of any that failed. That said i always found it a little strange, they did it because they could drop in the board and tile immediately.
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Old 08-18-2018, 05:57 PM   #12
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Hue,

When you get that in writing from Mainsville would you please post it .

Thank You
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Old 08-18-2018, 06:57 PM   #13
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"Your link took me to a RIDGID forum where guys were complaining about shower pan rough-in inspections.

You're still trying to find an unorthodox method of shower receptor construction similar to your Go-Board plan?"

did you read the whole thread?, as it turns into a thread about using redgard instead of a liner
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Old 08-18-2018, 08:40 PM   #14
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Hue, you aren't going to have a level perimeter with a linear drain unless the drain is in the middle of the shower and all walls slope to it.
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