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Unread 10-23-2021, 07:26 AM   #136
arnav
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Hell, Dan, that's kinda like askin' how many pancakes does it take to cover a dog house!
Duh, everyone knows that's 42!

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Ledger board for what purpose?
It establishes the raised platform for the tub, and the shower is embedded within it (please see attached proposed layout.
not only are the ledger boards attached to the cinderblocks, but they are also sitting directly on top of the new joists and sub-floor you saw in the last few posts.

Quote:
What's it gonna support?
Since the shower is embedded within the 2x6 space, technically speaking it is only supporting the tub.

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Exactly what kinda "cinderblocks" you got?
That's harder to answer. Seems to be almost identical to the ones I recently picked up in HD. https://www.homedepot.com/p/8-in-x-8...1924/202323962

Quote:
What size Tapcons you fixin' to use?
1. 3/16" x 2-3/4". My impact driver has been snapping some of these despite drilling a hole as per the instructions Maybe a bad brittle batch.
2. When those don't "bite" and spin in place, I redrill and use 1/4" x 3-3/4"

Quote:
Who dies if your attachment fails?
Dying is is always possible but not likely. If the raised platform fails you will fall a whopping 6" on the subfloor below

Thx for the help
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Unread 10-23-2021, 08:14 AM   #137
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Yes, I'm sorry, it was obviously 42. So, you got any other questions?

It's the nine feet that threw me off. I don't see any place in your previous photos that would permit a long horizontal board to be attached to the block wall. All the walls seem to be studded with vertical boards. No horizontal space wider than about 14.5 inches. Gimme more hints.

If this ledger can/will be supported from below, your fastening to the block wall (wherever that might be) could be minimal. Just enough to ensure the ledger can't move horizontally, such force seeming to be very little beinashow it's supporting a vertical load and not much of one at that. If I'm understanding the situation at all, which may or may not be the case, eh?

Fastening into those hollow blocks with Tapcons is not always easy, as you've apparently learned. You get only one shot and it's gotta be just right, lest you strip out the hole or you break off the screw. My little cordless Makita impact driver will happily snap the screw if attention is not paid. If you move up to the 1/4" Tapcons, rather than the 3/16ths," you'll find improvement in both categories. If the ledger, or whatever I'd be fastening, needs to be somewhat strong, I'd always want to use construction adhesive as well as the mechanical fasteners.

But I still don't see where you'd put a horizontal nine-foot board against the blocks on any of your walls.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-23-2021, 08:42 AM   #138
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Here are some more pics for context.

1. The original builder's platform. It is obviously no longer there. the 9 footer is where they used a metal stud.
2. The new platform's layout. The shower mud slopes are within the platform on the right. The tub is sitting on top of the platform on the left hand side.

I can start to cut the 2 x 6 and place them against the wall to make it easier to see where they go.

Either way, I take away from this that I don't need to obsess too much over it. Maybe a tapcon every foot or a little less (say 8'")

Thx!
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Unread 10-23-2021, 09:00 AM   #139
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Yes, if that 2x6 is supported from below, your 1-foot schedule should be plenty if you need them at all. The joists should hold it in place, the support from below will hold it up, non?

But I thought you'd already built that whole structure. Not so?
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Unread 10-23-2021, 09:45 AM   #140
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Originally Posted by CX
But I thought you'd already built that whole structure. Not so?
So there are two structures to build:

1. Joists + subflooring to bring the structure up to the overall bathroom floor level. This is what you saw in the posts above that I already completed. It constitute a small crawl space. Ideally this is where you would stop and build the shower and put the tub directly on. That is, most commonly, showers and tubs are put at the same level as the rest of the flooring. The situation I have is unique for 2 reasons:
i) There is a concrete pour right below (a porch's ceiling) so there is no room for the plumbing / p-traps.
ii) due south, there is a concrete beam so there is no way to route the pipes into the crawl space on the opposite side of the beam. You will need to core drill through the beam which is probably not a good idea. So the only other option is to build a raised platform to hold the plumbing and to transition the plumbing above the beam to the adjacent crawl space
2. Said raised platform from 2 x 6 to host the plumbing. The original shower was built on-top of said Platform. This created a huge slipping hazard since you had to come off the height of the curb and then the 2x 6 platform. It was really dangerous. I'll try and find a pic of the original construction. To somewhat mitigate it, instead of building the shower above the Platform, I am planning to embed the shower within the Platform. Almost a curbless like look only that it is not truly curbless. The 2x6 Platform is the curb....
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Unread 10-25-2021, 08:06 PM   #141
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Hi,

Previously, for tiles less than 18" that I set, the thickness of the thinset was around 1/8" for the required 100% coverage.
Local site conditions / variations non-withstanding, what thinset thickness you think I can expect for a 24 x 48 (1/4" thick) porcelain slabs?

Objective: Calculate how far from the wall the tiles will extend so that I know where to position the p-trap + linear drain. Ideally they would be flush or at least close enough to allow a silicone bead but not far enough so that you need to tile or grout...

Thx!
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Unread 10-26-2021, 02:20 PM   #142
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What do you think? 1/4"?

This is not instead of a coverage test, but rather just to plan the plumbing. I usually do the coverage test at the beginning of the tiling phase...

Thx!
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Unread 10-26-2021, 04:11 PM   #143
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Dan, if you really need to know, you're just gonna need to do a test. Set one tile using your mortar, your trowel, and your technique. Then measure the overall thicknes of the installed tile.

You don't need to waste a tile. You can remove it immediately, scrape and wash off the mortar from the tile, and it's good to go on the real wall.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-31-2021, 08:59 AM   #144
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Floating vanity

This is the first floating vanity I am installing. Please see attached pics for the supplied hardware. I added double 2x6 ledge boards behind it so I am not concerned about it falling. I am concerned with that really small bracket compressing the drywall and shifting the vanity over time. Because of the drawers and the cinderblocks behind, the plumbing is super accurate and there is almost no gap between the pipes and the drawers (and I don't want that to change over time).

What do you think about attaching that bracket instead over the drywall, to a 1/2" x 5" x 6' ripped plywood sheet? I also have 3' long poplar and oak boards sitting around.
I would then drywall above and below the few inches of wood. All of it is hidden behind the vanity.

The other advantage is that I can attach the vanity permanently right now (which means I can secure the plumbing to their final location). If I secure the plumbing to the wall now, drywall and hang the vanity later, it will be hard to make sure it ends in the same spot where it was dry-fitted (and the tolerances require I get it perfectly right).

What do you think? Any reason not to do it if it makes life easier?

Thx!
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Unread 11-01-2021, 06:50 AM   #145
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If I'm looking at it right I'd not worry at all about the bracket compressing the drywall. Sure, some of weight is in shear but a lot of weight is dangling 21 ish inches away from the wall. The vanity hangs from those brackets at the top so the weight of the cabinet, the drawers, the sink and top are all pushing the bottom of the vanity against the wall while simultaneously trying to pull the vanity away from the wall at the top.

If I were to worry about anything it would be:

A) the brackets on the vanity. While I think I see some sort of reinforcement block to which they are probably attached (in addition to the cabinet sides) I can't see what material is used nor how the brackets and blocks are attached.

B) The cabinet bracket; those small tabs that slip over the wall cleat, they look a bit on the slim side from here.

Over and above, it appears that the mounting system will hold the back of the vanity off the wall by approximately the thickness of the wall bracket. If so, and IF your wall was perfectly flat, only the bottom rear corners of the cabinet end panels will bear against the wall. If I were to be concerned about drywall being compressed anywhere it would be there. As well, you'll need to position those wall brackets perfectly so that they do not extend past the end of each side panel.

To my thinking, the opening in the drawer for the plumbing is less of a challenge. Simply remove the plastic finishing piece, enlarge the opening a bit, reinstall. Given that the rear rail of the drawer box is essentially not there at all that drawer will be relegated to light duty use or else the bottom will start sagging.

Or, install a rail just in front of the plumbing opening in the drawer and cut the rest off, which quite neatly solves your original dilemma.
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Unread 11-01-2021, 09:49 AM   #146
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Thank you very much Dan. That really helps.

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Originally Posted by ss3964spd
A) the brackets on the vanity. While I think I see some sort of reinforcement block to which they are probably attached (in addition to the cabinet sides) I can't see what material is used nor how the brackets and blocks are attached.
Better pics attached. I realized the plastic cover comes off easily exposing the mechanism inside.

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Originally Posted by ss3964spd
B) The cabinet bracket; those small tabs that slip over the wall cleat, they look a bit on the slim side from here.
Better pics attached. At least it comes with a 3 year warranty.

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Originally Posted by ss3964spd
As well, you'll need to position those wall brackets perfectly so that they do not extend past the end of each side panel.
Yeah, I realized that as well. It is a bit scary. If someone bumps into the vanity, there is not whole lot that would prevent it from sliding off. I'll put a few screws in the board that's in the back, not to hold the weight, but to prevent it from moving laterally.

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Originally Posted by ss3964spd
To my thinking, the opening in the drawer for the plumbing is less of a challenge. Simply remove the plastic finishing piece, enlarge the opening a bit, reinstall. Given that the rear rail of the drawer box is essentially not there at all that drawer will be relegated to light duty use or else the bottom will start sagging.
You are absolutely right. We are waiting on the sink to be delivered. It is still stuck in China. The bath place gave the cabinets so I can start to work on the plumbing. They said they will take it back at any point if we get tired of waiting. So I was on a mission to try and finalize the plumbing without modifying the vanity. However, your point helps put it in perspective. I have been driving myself nuts unnecessarily. I'll keep everything as is and move on to work on something else. If and when the sink is delivered, I'll make the small modification to the vanity and secure the plumbing in place.

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Or, install a rail just in front of the plumbing opening in the drawer and cut the rest off, which quite neatly solves your original dilemma.
Sorry, this I didn't get. What do you mean? The dilemma is that to finalize the plumbing the vanity has to be hung (given the small tolerances). I can't hang it without drywall. If I put up the drywall I can't access the plumbing . Hence the thought to hang the vanity on a 5" wide board and then drywall to the board. I guess another option is to stop the drywall close to the end of the ledger board. This way the vanity can be hanged on the drywall, but the drywall won't hide the plumbing. When the plumbing is finalized, it can be covered with a separate drywall sheet.

Thx!
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Unread 11-01-2021, 11:42 AM   #147
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The pics of the cabinet mounted bracket/adjusting mechanism help.

Looks like there are two adjustments; 1) 1 for reach. You adjust the bottom bottom screw so that the bracket arm extends outward from the back plane of the cabinet as an aid to hanging the whole thing on the wall. After hung it gets readjusted to pull the cabinet back in against the wall. 2) The upper one appears to be a cam, and I think used to lock it in place.

Nevertheless, it still looks to me that the wall mounted brackets must be positioned exactly. Both left and right ends must be positioned so that they do not extend beyond the inside face of the cabinet sides while still enabling both "fingers" of the adjustment assembly arm to hook onto them. Given how close the outboard fingers are to the inside faces of the sides you have very little wiggle room.

Regarding the drawer. Currently the back rail of the drawer has had a section cut out of it to make room for the plumbing, basically eliminating the support it would normally add for the drawer bottom had it gone from side to side unbroken. The plastic piece may add a modicum of support but its main purpose is to keep Mrs. Dan's mascara from falling through the opening.

I proposed to simply cut the back of the drawer off in a straight line somewhere near the front of the U and install a rear rail. It would make the drawer considerably shorter overall, but would give you a lot more leeway for positioning the plumbing. You could also just make that opening wider by a couple of inches left and right, square it off, then box it in with some 1X material. Glued and screwed it would probably be stronger than it is now but retain most of the space.

Don't forget about your supply lines. They'll have to come out somewhere below the upper rear cabinet rail but above the top of the upper drawer.
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Unread 11-11-2021, 09:09 PM   #148
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Thx Dan, I forgot to thank you.

I need to lay hot+cold copper supply lines from left to right in the attached pics. Preferably transitioning to floor level as they enter the 2x6 platform so they can run below the pitched 2" PVC on the right.

Question: Do you see a reason why they can't be put underneath the furring strip between the 1.5" to 2" pvc? I would make sure to cover the entire length with a nail plates.

Thx!
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Unread 11-12-2021, 08:50 AM   #149
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No technical reason you can't run those supplies in the void under the furring strip that I can think of, only a practical reason.

I think it's going to be quite a challenge to assemble and sweat the joints circled.

The supplies come in from the left side, correct? Are those 3/4" copper? You need to supply the two sinks and the shower, correct?

Is there no way to run a vent for the two sinks straight up, thus avoiding the use of the AAV's?
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Unread 11-12-2021, 12:30 PM   #150
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I think it's going to be quite a challenge to assemble and sweat the joints circled.
The secret in cases like this is to preassemble and solder the bends and elbows, and then slide them in place and then sweat the rest of connections and risers in while they’re away from the meltable PVC.
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