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Unread 08-05-2015, 05:28 PM   #1
homeby5
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Rectangle Faux Wood Tile Installation

Hey Guys,

So, I am building a new house and am almost at the point of picking out and installing the flooring. I am performing almost all of the work myself and now I need a little advice about these 6 x 24 inch RECTIFIED porcelain tiles.

I have been watching videos and I notice that these are often installed without spacers, butted up against each other. Now....I know that the manufacturer will say to use 1/16 inch spacers and fill in with grout but I would rather not and have seen it done without spacers. I have two questions about this installation

1) Even though there is really not much of a gap, there still is a hair of a line in between the tiles. Do I mix real thin grout or something and sponge it in the groove, use another material or nothing at all?

2) This is my big concern. I am planning tiling my whole house without thresholds so the wood look will flow completely. This includes going into the bedrooms and bathrooms. I am concerned that if the rooms are not exactly square then the tiles butting up against the finishing wall may not be perfectly straight in reference to the wall. I imagine there is a trick to this as I know most rooms are not perfectly square. How do the pros compensate for this? Do the BB's, plus tucking the tile under the sheet rock, allow for enough room to cover any imperfections with non straight runs? Any other suggestions?

Thanks guys. I'm a newbie at most of this stuff so I have relied on forum advice a lot during my construction project and it has been GREAT
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Unread 08-05-2015, 06:13 PM   #2
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Hey Tom- You will want at least a 1/16" grout joint in your floor. What you are describing is a pretty technical tile installation and will most likely require a bit of prep work to level your substrate.
One might suggest a "pressed" edge tile that is a little more forgiving. Also a 1/8" grout joint does not look bad.
I'm not saying you can't do it...but there are many professional tile installers that have trouble with the scope of work that you are undertaking.
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Unread 08-05-2015, 06:19 PM   #3
homeby5
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Thanks Issac..
Look at this video and tell me if this procedure is right? This video is a link and for some reason I cannot post a link? Anyway just go to youtube and put this after the fwd slash. This is how I was planning on installing it. Also....supposed the final wall is not exactly square? Is there a trick for this scenario?

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Last edited by Tiger Mountain Tile Inc; 08-05-2015 at 09:46 PM. Reason: embed vid
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Unread 08-05-2015, 06:27 PM   #4
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A rectified plank tile will not be fun to install. I've done two complete houses with planks, by myself ... each took several weeks .. and it was NOT rectified.

You'll want a gap between the tile and walls for expansion, your baseboards will cover that gap, I don't use spacers with planks on the floor, it's pretty easy to eyeball your grout line, which you'll want to be at least a 16th, like Isaac suggested ..

Nothing you can do about unsquare rooms and walls, always run your tile square .. it falls where it will.
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Unread 08-05-2015, 06:40 PM   #5
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I have a concrete floor on a new construction. Do I still have to worry about expansion? Thanks for bearing with my ignorant questions

BTW...I've laid quite a bit of tile. I've just never tackled a plank job and I don't want to assume anything as a mistake will cost thousands.
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Unread 08-05-2015, 08:07 PM   #6
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Yes, you still need the gap .. I would think about some kind of underlayment for crack suppression as well ..

Planks take time, rectified planks take more, if you proceed with them I'd look into some type of lippage system as well ..
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Unread 08-05-2015, 10:02 PM   #7
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Hi Tom and welcome to the forum.

The video is 32 minutes so I didn't watch past about 15 seconds. I don't know if there's a short section of it that is of interest to us?

The industry standard is a minimum 1/16th grout joint. The plank tiles typically have some sort of crown, or bow, to them. They are generally not perfectly flat. So when you off set them in a pattern you have the crown-high point- lining up with the ends -low point- and this can cause issues with lippage. One tile being higher than the one next to it.

A small grout joint, or no grout joint, will draw even more attention to this issue. So as pros, we know that this isn't a simple install and are trying to give you a good chance at success.

You might want to lay some tile out in a pattern and see how much lippage there is between the tiles and get an idea of what to expect.

Here's a couple of more things that will help to have a successful installation:
You'll need movement joints every 20 feet or so inside. Sometimes closer if a particular area gets a lot of sun light.

You'll want to use a medium bed mortar for large tiles.
You can put some of those terms in the search engine to find out about them and feel free to come back and ask more questions.

As far as squaring up rooms you'll want to make the areas that count as straight as possible. You're right that it probably won't be straight everywhere but you'll want to prioritize what needs to be straight. Such things as long hallways and entrance ways.
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Unread 08-06-2015, 04:19 AM   #8
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Thanks again guys. This is why I come to places like this. I know enough to know I don't know enough
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Unread 08-06-2015, 04:37 AM   #9
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Rectified vs Pressed Plank Tile Installation

Ok. Thanks to the advice here in another thread, I believe I am going to lay some plank tile using 1/16th spacers. Thanks for the other advice BTW
I saw a demo of some stuff my wife likes (happy wife and all...) and it was laid with 1/16th spacing but it is pressed. Would I be better to insist she find rectified planks instead of pressed planks? Does it matter? Also, which would make for a easier and better job considering lippage? Remember....I'm no virgin but still I'm an amateur here
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Unread 08-06-2015, 05:54 AM   #10
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Tom, it'll help if you'll keep all your project questions on one thread so folks can see what you're working on and what's been previously asked and answered.

You'll find you have a bit more trouble controlling unwanted lippage with the rectified edges, but the important thing is how flat the tiles are and how flat your substrate is. You're gonna have trouble with a 1/16th" joint in any case, but it's unlikely you'll be able to maintain it at all with the calibrated tiles rather than a rectified tile.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 08-06-2015, 05:56 AM   #11
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Will do...Thanks!

Also...Quick question. I have a new construction CBS home and concrete floor that is a pier style home....I drive underneath the house so the slab does not sit on the ground. Anyway, I have read several times that a moisture sealer should be applied to the concrete before tile installation to prevent moisture coming up through the concrete. That's cool and all but I have to ask a silly question. Since the concrete is supposed to pass the "water" test to ensure proper adhesion, does the moisture sealer actually prevent proper adhesion? I realize the answer is "no" since most everyone recommends a sealer but I'm just thinking out loud here. Can someone explain the reasoning behind this?
Thanks
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Unread 08-06-2015, 06:30 AM   #12
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Tom, you do not wanna seal the surface of the concrete that is to receive ceramic tile.

If other building science requirements call for a moisture or vapor retarder for that suspended concrete floor, I recommend you install it on the bottom side.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 08-06-2015, 03:47 PM   #13
homeby5
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Wow...Really? Every article I have read stresses some sort of moisture sealer on concrete. I am glad I asked what I though was a stupid question. Thanks again as you may have saved me a lot of re-work and money
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Unread 08-06-2015, 04:11 PM   #14
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1/16" vs 1/8"

Tom- I would give anyone the same advice who has not laid rectified planks before---even some pretty competent GC's. You are going to be happier with a 1/8" joint with a pressed (calibrated) tile than a rectified tile with a 1/16" joint if there is lippage. Unless you do extensive prep work, and plan on laying under 50 sf in a day, get a perfect layout, use a clip leveling system, learn how to properly work and trowel medium bed mortar, and use a really flat high quality porcelain, odds are that's what you will end up with.

If it were a bathroom I'd say go for it. A whole house is a different animal.

You can eyeball your joints with plank tiles as long as you snap lines every couple feet or so and stay on your lines. A pressed edge tile has a wider joint at the face of the tile than at the back. So if you stick an 1/8" spacer in there, you will end up with more like 3/16". To get an 1/8", I would use a 1/16" spacer and keep it loose. Stay on your square lines. Good thing about plank is you only really need to stay parallel with your layout lengthwise. You don't need to worry as much about the perpendicular direction because the short end of the planks have one or two tiles in between them.
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