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Old 01-03-2007, 09:54 PM   #1
H20Man
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Tub faucet repair + drain hole in concrete slab

Hi,

My house was built in 2001 and has a concrete slab. I'm in Alabama. In our guest bathroom (which we haven't used a lot until recently), I've noticed that the tub faucet doesn't appear to be sealed against the body of the tub (it's a fiberglass 1 piece tub stall). I had the wall open for some other repairs and noticed that I was correct. If you spray water at the faucet with the removeable shower head, water drips through the hole and under the tub. See pics. Is this area normally sealed up? If so, is there a gasket or something missing here?

This picture is looking at the copper pipe for the faucet where it goes through the tub from behind (inside the wall):


This one is looking at the faucet from inside the tub. I am pulling it away from the wall slightly. You can't see it too well in the pic, but the pipe is visible in there:


Another shot with the flash:


What do you guys think? Anything missing?

Ok, second question.... I was looking inside the wall and noticed that when the house was built (2001) and they were installing the drain pcv piping for the tub, it looks like they messed something up and had to jackhammer a hole in the slab. When they were done, they just filled the hole with gravel:



If you push your finger through the gravel, after a few inches you come to dirt. The dirt is moist, too. I remodeled our master bath last year and I know the tub in there is not like this. The hole doesn't go all the way through the slab to grade. With all the talk about needing vapor barries under slabs and etc, it doesn't seem like having an open hole like that is a good idea. Should I fill it with something? If so, what (concrete?) and do I need to put some plastic in there first?

Thanks guys!

Rick
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Old 01-03-2007, 10:36 PM   #2
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Quote:
Anything missing?
yep - a bead of silly-cone
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Old 01-03-2007, 11:01 PM   #3
H20Man
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The problem with silicone is that the faucet is not fixed in place. It will move around a little if you press on it. The copper pipe is all that is holding it stable. So silcone would quickly come loose.
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Old 01-03-2007, 11:09 PM   #4
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what do you mean by "move?" is the water outlet not tight on the pipe nipple through the tub wall?
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Old 01-03-2007, 11:53 PM   #5
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Yes, from the picture it looks like the spout is attached to the end of the copper pipe, which is not fastened to any framing.

If the spout moves when you pull on it or when you push sideways on it, chances are caulk will not last long, silicone or otherwise.

If you have access to the plumbing from the other side, you can install some wood members, brackets, etc. and fasten the copper pipe to the framing, near the spout.

The hole in the slab can be filled with concrete.

DG
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Old 01-04-2007, 12:43 AM   #6
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yes, if the copper is not anchored you have a bigger problem than a little caulk will fix. Secure the plumbing such that the spigot is firm against the tub, then run a bead of silicone around it.
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Old 01-04-2007, 11:54 AM   #7
H20Man
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thanks guys. I'll anchor the pipe to a framing member.

As for the hole, I'll fill it with quikrete. Are holes like that normally left open or did the plumber do a halfway job?

Should I put a vapor barrier (plastic) in the hole first?

Rick
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Old 01-04-2007, 12:41 PM   #8
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That's normal for plumbers around here.. You generally have to go back n fix stuff up after they've done their work.... Oh, and electricians aren't known for cleaning up either... But, you bet tile guys are......
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