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Unread 05-06-2020, 04:51 PM   #16
Kman
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All of the above questions/conditions are important, but even if all of them were met, they wouldn't matter in your case because the tile in your picture was never bonded to the mortar on the floor. There's not even a trace of it on the tile, at least none that I can see.
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Unread 05-06-2020, 05:18 PM   #17
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I too noticed they did not bond to the thinset! Made for easy removal . Not sure exactly what that guy did.. Or didn't do. Too dry of a mix, didn't press in place?

Joist span is about 6.5 feet... Rounded up to 7 feet when I used the deflectolater.

Yes I can get the old thinset off the subfloor. It comes up fairly easy . It sticks to the wood about as good as the tile.


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Unread 05-06-2020, 06:11 PM   #18
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It REALLY helps if you back butter the tile prior to putting it down. That fills in the waffle like you have on that tile, and if you do that right, makes bonding much better. But, you're also supposed to move the tile back and forth to actually smush (great technical term!) the thinset so it covers the entire surface. Industry guidelines want 100% of the edges and at least 90% of the tile covered with thinset on a floor (more is better). If you're going to be buying trowels, look into slant-notched ones...the notches, are taller and thinner, and because they are slanted, fall over to make a much flatter surface as the trowel goes past...easier to get full coverage without as much work. Very popular in Europe, but sold here, too.
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Unread 05-07-2020, 09:04 AM   #19
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Kerdi sounds good.

If I use kerdi on the pan, are seams allowed? Basically, if my pan is larger than the roll of kerdi is wide.

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Unread 05-07-2020, 09:25 AM   #20
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Seams are allowed. I think the install instructions want the overlap to be not less than 2". Same for all overlaps, be they on the walls or in corners.
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Unread 05-07-2020, 09:34 AM   #21
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But the Kerdi overlap on the shower floor must not be made over the bonding flange, Bryan.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 05-07-2020, 09:52 AM   #22
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Right, the bonding flange for the Kerdi drain assembly, which you'll need if you choose to use Kerdi membrane to water proof the shower floor.
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Unread 05-07-2020, 04:04 PM   #23
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To fasten the hardibacker to the subfloor, I know backer screws or roofing nails are both approved by manufacturer. I have only ever used the screws before.
I was thinking that the nail gun method seems more efficient, especially as I move on to the larger rooms.
Anyone with experience have any advice, or reasons I would not want to nail?

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Unread 05-07-2020, 04:14 PM   #24
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There are pros and cons for both.

With screws, you have the potential for screw-jacking the panel...they cost more, and take more time. Done right, you can get them flush with the panel, which is nice when trying to spread your thinset as you don't catch the edge with the trowel.

With nails, finding the required galvanized nails so you could use a gun may be hard. Some want hot dipped nails...most of the collated ones I've seen are electroplated...not the same. It's unlikely you'll get the nailheads recessed, so you'll have the trowel catching on each edge. Assuming you can find the required nails, it should go faster until you start to tile.

I think with the potential for amount of force applied, the screws MIGHT be more likely to embed the panel, but if done right with the nails, those SHOULD be okay. It comes down to workmanship and technique.
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Unread 05-07-2020, 04:28 PM   #25
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We still don't know the joist spacing (or anything else about them) or the subfloor thickness and edge type.
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Unread 05-07-2020, 05:18 PM   #26
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2x6 on 16" centers, spanning 6.5 feet. Joists sit on top of 4x8 beams and peirs every 6 feet. 3/4 ply... Unsure if it's t&g since I can't see the edges.

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Unread 05-08-2020, 05:34 PM   #27
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So at the hole for the old tub drain I was able to get a better view of the subfloor material.
Appears to be a 5 ply with 2 of the layers being some sort of osb?
Anyone familiar with thus material? I've never seen it before.

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Unread 05-09-2020, 06:28 AM   #28
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Do you have a wider picture of the floor after the mortar was cleaned off? Sometimes it difficult to tell from a close-up of a small piece.
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Unread 05-09-2020, 09:56 AM   #29
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Here's a couple pictures of the floor. There are still a few little patches it thinset I will scrape off. I only did the rough scrape so far to get the bulk removed. The area that wasn't under the cabinets or tub and shower was painted. Not sure why, wasn't me.
I found the water heater platform in the garage to be made of the same osb core plywood. The edge of that shows a t&g groove. That leads be to believe that the house subfloor in fact is t&g.

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Unread 05-09-2020, 10:11 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CX, Post 6
In addition to the other questions, are those cracks parallel to the floor joists or perpendicular to them?
Still looking for an answer to that question, Bryan.

I've got no idea what that subflooring is, nor what its characteristics might be. Thought I'd been through all the iterations in plywood over the years, including lumber core, but I've not seen that one. The face plies appear to be really thin, more like a veneer plywood. And it's the face plies you're depending upon in the strength axis of the panels.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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