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Unread 06-03-2017, 01:27 PM   #31
jadnashua
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WIth your drain located as shown, you're going to have a significant slope from the entryway verses on the long side to the wall. You need a minimum of 1/4"/foot from the drain to any edge, and with your drain offset, the required height of the drain will exaggerate the issue by being steep to the entryway.

If you could move the drain closer to the middle, it would work out better. Or, move it to the outside edge and then do a linear drain with one slope to it.
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Unread 06-03-2017, 04:07 PM   #32
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Thanks Jim and CX. I did a redraw with both of your suggested drain option locations included. Jim, I think your recommendation makes a lot of sense. I'm not necessarily going to be hung up on "centering" the drain under the shower head because the space is somewhat unique. One constraint I am mindful of is the 4' trap arm length back to the stack where I am wet-venting the group. Also, I want to keep as little plumbing under the slab as possible should something bad happen in the future (hopefully not). As a result, I took your idea and used the longest linear drain (47") and additionally tried the off-set drain to see how it looked. I also pulled it off the wall a little which probably makes for more work. Does the linear drain still use the Kerdi drain with the large-radius flange? Again, I think either of your recommendations Jim are pretty good. I appreciate you sharing your solid knowledge of the product set with me as I work through this design. You guys know your stuff (tile, plumbing and what the utility aspect of it is which sometimes gets overlooked). What looks good to you Jim?
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Unread 06-03-2017, 07:20 PM   #33
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When using a bonded membrane like Kerdi and a linear drain, it's best to use one designed for use with the membrane. There are some others that can work. Be aware, though, that linear drains are lots more expensive than a round one! And, you need to ensure you get both the drain body, and the grate you want. The least expensive grate is the tiled one, since they don't have to polish one while keeping it exactly straight so it will fit. When you use a tiled grate, it ends up with a slot all around the perimeter to let the water in. If you can't put the linear drain up against the wall, then you do want to slope the other edge some to it, but, unlike a more conventional drain where you typically want a level perimeter, a linear drain type shower inherently does not have a level perimeter. Schluter does make a SS trim piece that can be used to make the perimeter level, if that would work out for you.

On a 2" pipe, I think you'll find the trap arm limitation is 5' before the vent (it varies by pipe diameter) in most codes in the US. You'd need to know which code and code cycle (year) your area uses.
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Unread 06-04-2017, 06:59 PM   #34
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Jim, you are right about the cost of those linear drains. Wow! I even started looking for some knock-offs based on a couple industrious-minded threads about making your own (unsuccessful). Regardless, I wouldn't mix and match anything non-Schluter I found with a Schluter system I guess. I kinda like the linear drain, but I think the wall hung toilet as a high cost item for this project probably takes precedence. With a linear drain, this project might balloon out of control.
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Unread 06-04-2017, 07:49 PM   #35
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John, maybe you've mentioned it but are you planning to tile the walls?
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Unread 06-05-2017, 04:44 AM   #36
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Good question Davy. I definitely plan on tiling the walls. Since the room is basically going to be a shower, I need to make sure I have the walls covered. I may use a shower curtain to limit some of the splashing against the far wall.
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Unread 06-19-2017, 08:33 AM   #37
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Joist Spacing and Wood SubFloor Assembly Question

Hello,

I am considering installing a crawlspace instead of a slab on grade and am curious to know what an ideal floor assembly for a shower would be if you were a pro arriving on a job site. Basically, what joist spacing and plywood (# of courses and thickness) assembly details might give the client the most options in terms of tile choices due to a robust underlayment assembly detail? FWIW, I did read the pdf describing the proper 1/4 span offset of seams for the top sheet of underlayment.

Thanks in advance.
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Unread 06-19-2017, 09:06 AM   #38
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Hi John

A little bit more info may help. How big is the area (max length and square feet) and is this an addition to the house?
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Unread 06-19-2017, 10:47 AM   #39
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Given the option of deciding the structure in advance, John, you need to design for the particular floor covering you intend to use. There are different requirements for the different floors.

For a shower, you need only meet building code, which is the minimum requirement. I would recommend 16" on center joist spacing with the spans yielding the code (and ceramic tile industry) maximum deflection of L/360. A minimum subflooring of 3/4" plywood or OSB is adequate for a shower installation. I'd design in a second layer of nominal 1/2" plywood for any tile areas, but it's not required by most tile substrate manufactures for ceramic tile. If you plan stone tile, it would be a requirement.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 06-19-2017, 01:29 PM   #40
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Hi prodjsaig,

The structure is actually 12'x18' and the bathroom (wet room) is about 4'6'x6'. I would most likely run the floor joists across the 12' span. I could possibly do a girder at the 6' mark if I needed the strength.
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Unread 06-19-2017, 01:32 PM   #41
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John, if this is the same project as your "wet room" we need to get that combined here.
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Unread 07-07-2017, 02:22 PM   #42
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Recessed Subfloor Question

Hello,

I am considering installing a recessed floor for a bathroom. It seems to me the most reasonable way to achieve this with conventional framing techniques would be to use 2x12 floor joists for the floor height of the main floor and then use 2x10 floor joists for the bathroom. Does this seem like an inuititive approach? There will be a crawlspace to work with. I am just seeking advice on how to plan the required substrates for floor tile and a presloped mortar bed.

Thanks in advance.
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Unread 07-07-2017, 03:35 PM   #43
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Question

Why recess the entire bathroom?

Usually I head off the joists at the point of the shower pan footprint, then drop the framing for shower pan to a lower level. Whether that means using 2x10s or dropping 12s to a different height.
I don't know how you plan to construct your pan but plan on 3/4" subfloor+ your pan whether that's a prefab foam, or a drypack with membrane on top.
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Unread 07-13-2017, 06:57 PM   #44
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Thanks for the suggestions so far. Here is a redraw of the recessed floor joists. I was thinking about using 2x10s for the structure and then drop down to 2x8s for the recessed floor (curbless). I think I am missing a few framing members but I want to see if I am on the right track. I have been reading a lot here about depth of recess (from 2" to 4" I have seen), orientation of subfloor to floor joists and where to set the height of the schluter drain flange. Let me know if I am on the right track and I will continue to render the details so that this thread may help others visualize the assembly as well.

The annotated text is hard to read but I am contemplating using 2x12 or 2x10 for a rim and then reducing to 2x8 for the floor joists. I am also going to use 7/8" Advantec or 3/4" Plywood as folks seem to recommend. Ledge around the post is for a SIP panel to rest on.

Thanks.
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Unread 07-14-2017, 09:41 AM   #45
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Additionally, I found this cross section detail online and I am wondering if this
looks correct (even though it only has one course of plywood).
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