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Old 09-07-2005, 01:13 PM   #1
rushers
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How to fix 80mm wood inlay into tumbled travertine

I am busy laying an 80mm hard wood inlay into a travertine hallway. How best doe one fix the wood to the floor a how much of a gap between the wood and tile? Grout or not grout between the wood inlay the travertine? Can one use bitumen to help fix the wood or will it stain the travertine?
Thanks Tony
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Old 09-07-2005, 05:26 PM   #2
Steven Hauser
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Hi Tony,

all your answers depend on what type of wear it will get.

Is the wood 80mm wide and 20 mm thick or 80mm thick?

Will it prestained and the edges sealed before installation?

Our crews usually grid the whole installation our precisely make a jig to adjust for variances in height and install the travertine first.

Then the wood can be put in afterward.

This process requires you to be very precise and clean. We leave 1mm grout lines that we either caulk or grout depending on how absorbant the wood is.

We never leave it open because it is unsanitary and dirt will eventually fill the gaps.



Good luck.
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Old 09-07-2005, 05:29 PM   #3
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Hello Tony. Welcome aboard.

Numero Uno: I would not inlay wood into a travertine floor. The wood will wear much faster than the stone. It's something we always see in decorating magazines that is beautiful, but it just doesn't work out well in the real world.

Now, how to do it: Don't really know, but bitumen or butil is not something I would try. I would rather go with Liquid Nails, but I don't know what country you're in. Maybe that's not available.
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Old 09-07-2005, 05:40 PM   #4
Scooter
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Epoxy.

The amount of space you use would depend on the movement factor of the wood and how it is cut. Quarter sawn oak, for example, is quite stable. Side grain Doug Fir, on the other hand, moves like crazy.
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Old 09-08-2005, 11:59 AM   #5
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Some answers to the questions. I am in South Africa. Liquid Nails? I have not heard of these but I am no stone setter or carpenter, so please elaborate. My tiler/joiner may know more, but they have not done an instillaton like this before. The travertine is being laid first and the wood fitted afterwards, the floor will chipped to the correct depth along the length of the wood before the it is laid. The wood chosen is African rosewood which is very hard and very stable and it will be stained treated before laying so as not to colour the stone. We have chosen a 20mm thick by 80mm wide inlay so that if/when we run into wear issues we can remove it and possibly lay a mosaic pattern or stone inlay at a later date.
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Old 09-08-2005, 01:02 PM   #6
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Here is info on Liquid Nails. It is a tube/cartridge packaged construction adhesive that contains a number of petroleum distillates, solvent, clay and limestone. Plus some other stuff.

http://www.liquidnails.com/msds/LN601.PDF

From the website, it appears not to be available outside North America. You might look at the list of ingredients and see if something similar is available in your area. Basically it's sticky gooey stuff that comes in a tube, and holds real good when it dries. Sorta like liquid nails!
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Old 09-08-2005, 01:13 PM   #7
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It won't wear down if the wood is placed, or inset, a sixteeth or so under the level of the tile.
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Old 09-08-2005, 05:44 PM   #8
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Liquid nails is probably sufficient but I saw a test of adhesives (testing wood to concrete) and urethane based adhesives were far superior to the liquid nails (unless the liquid nails they tested is a different product than you are referencing - it was the typical water based stuff).

BTW, urethane is almost always used to glue down wood floors to concrete. They also made a point that the urethane would work on a polyurethane finish. I once tested liquid nails on finished wood and it was almost useless.

Bostich makes a product for wood floors on concrete. Problem is urethane adhesives are usually only sold by flooring distributors.
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