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Unread 03-22-2007, 08:30 PM   #1
Rob B
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floor prep question

I'm new here, so forgive me for my lack of knowledge. I am in the process of remodeling a bathroom and I am preparing the floor for tile application. The floor had various layers of vinyl, then hardwood and finally the old t&g subfloor. I have removed it down to the subfloor and placed 3/4 plywood on top of it. This is a small bath (approx 5' x 6') just for your info.
The floor is sloping from the back wall to front approx 2". What would be the best way to level the floor (w/o jacking up the house) prior to tile application?

Thanks in advance,

Rob B
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Unread 03-22-2007, 09:12 PM   #2
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Unread 03-22-2007, 09:26 PM   #3
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Unread 03-22-2007, 10:11 PM   #4
Tool Guy - Kg
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Hi Rob, welcome to the forum.

Wow, that's a lot of height difference for such a short area. Is that all due to settling, or is there another problem?

And is the low part of the floor by the door or on the far side of the room?

While we're waiting for you to answer back, let's back up for a second and ask a basic question. Is your floor structure up to the task of supporting a stiff tile floor to keep it from cracking? You can answer that by using this Deflecto calculator to assess your floor.
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Unread 03-23-2007, 06:44 AM   #5
Rob B
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The uneven floor is due to settling. The joists are in good condition, except for one which was cut for a drain (go figure). I do believe it will support tile, however. The questionable areas (other than the where the drain is at) are in places that will be non-weight bearing.

Yes, the low area is at the door. It slopes from the back down to the door. It is relatively flat around where the door opens. The biggest difference in slope is in the first 3 feet off of the back wall. This also poses another problem, because that's where the tile shower has to go.

Since the problem is mainly in the back of the room and where the shower will go, would I be better off to do it in maybe two sections? My fear is that if I do the entire room my floor level at the door is going to be too high.
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Unread 03-23-2007, 08:47 AM   #6
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Rob,
Welcome to the Forum.....

I'm having a little difficulty with your dilema..

Quote:
Yes, the low area is at the door. It slopes from the back down to the door.
Then....
Quote:
It is relatively flat around where the door opens.
Then....
Quote:
The biggest difference in slope is in the first 3 feet off of the back wall.
Quote:
Since the problem is mainly in the back of the room and where the shower will go
Quote:
My fear is that if I do the entire room my floor level at the door is going to be too high.
Is the low spot in the rear (at the shower) or at the door?

and... Like Bubba said, have you done a deflecto on your joist structure?
Let's start with that first....
The floor can be leveled with SLC if it's at the shower end of the room and it won't affect the door end at all.
Don't like the fact that the joist has been compromised for the drain either.
Can you get to the area below your shower to support the floor?
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Unread 03-23-2007, 10:08 AM   #7
Rob B
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Sorry for the confusion.
Answer to first question - I've done a deflecto and the joists will support it. I have plenty of room underneath to work in order to do extra bracing support if I need to. I really think the only area that needs work is where the joist was cut for the drain. I plan on bracing it.

Next question - The floor is higher at the back wall. It drops significantly (approx 1.5" within the first 3 feet (coming from the back wall toward the door). The last 3 feet toward the door has very little slope. The house was built in 1939 and it's simply from settling and shifting.
The floor is lowest around the door. However, it is level with the adjoining room. This is my dilemma. If I use SLC to level the floor, it is going raise up the area around the door close to 1.5". Not a big deal I guess, but it will create an undesirable step-up at the door. Also, should I frame the shower and leave it out of the pour or pour the entire floor at once? There seems to be differing opinions on what the best option is.

Rob
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