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Unread 08-18-2006, 06:47 AM   #1
Zachnefein
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Best route to flatten this floor?

Hi!

My names Mark.

I'm helping my Father in law re-do his bathroom, and this'll be a first time tiling for both of us.

I've poked around the libbery, and done a number of searches over the last couple of days, great resource here by the way, and am still not very confident on the best way to flatten this floor for tile installation.

The floor is right around 25 sf, and we'll be laying 12" ceramic tiles... I have no other details on the tile at the moment.

The house is on a slab, built in '58, we've already pulled up the old tile and black-jack, and also put on about 1 10lb. box of "Henry 547 Unipro" Universal patch and skimcoat, per advice at the local Lowe's (pictures below).

I'd read about SLCs prior to us doing the patch/skimcoat, but the salesman at Lowe's told my FIL that they didn't carry it, and that this was what we needed.

I think we're on a route to more of a mess than what we started with.

The worst area is just behind the toilet drain, which needs built up probably around 3/8", and I believe that the area directly around the drain is our highest point. It's a bit akward just getting the trowel in there, and I don't think we're doing a very good job of leveling it so far.

My home improvement skills are pretty limited, I've done some dywall and plumbing over the years, and have some basic electrical experience, but am looking at this tile project with basicly just what I've learned on this site, and a few others, in the past couple of days... My FIL, from what the guys at Lowe's are saying (I think he may have attended one of their tiling classes also - not sure).

I hope this is enough info - here's some pics:

Well, I was going to post pictures and a link to the product specs we used, above, but the post won't submit with URLs...

No urls... on the internet??
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Unread 08-18-2006, 07:51 AM   #2
cx
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Welcome, Mark.

No urls until you have at least ten posts. That's set up as an anti-spam device. We get no end of advertisements in the form of one-post regustrations with links.

The photos you should be able to attach, though. Gotta be 50K or smaller and you can't preview before you post or they disappear. Dunno why, but they do.

Not familiar with the Henry product you used, but their site seems to describe it as a suitable product for your use. Have no eye-dee how easy/difficult it is to use, but you aughta be able to get the floor flattened in a few tries at least.

Maybe one of our pro tilers will know what it is and give you more insight.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 08-18-2006, 07:54 AM   #3
bbcamp
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Mark, we require folks have 10 posts under their belt before we allow them to post links. Anti-robo-spammer thingie. You can attach pictures, though. Look below the message box for the "Manage Attachments" button. Also, you can spell out the link using "dot" and we'll figure it out.

Sometimes it's easier to lower the high spots than raise the low spots, especially if the high spot is a small area compared to the rest of the floor. Rent a "bush hammer" or scarifier tool. or if the area is small enough, a cold chisel and 3-pound hammer will work. What you want is a floor that is no more than 1/4" out of plane in any 10 foot area, so you are fairly close as it is now.
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Unread 08-18-2006, 09:48 AM   #4
Zachnefein
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Thanks for clarifying on the links. It makes sense, I've just never run across this particular technique for anti-spam.

Here are some pics.

As you can see, the build up is looking pretty sloppy.

The first ten 10lb box we mixed was only workable for about 8 minutes (the constructions say 20 minutes).. so we lost half of it.. on the second batch, we just mixed half a box and managed to get it all down. Just not very smoothly.

The pics don't realy seem to show how bad it actualy looks.

I keep wanting to think that a SLC would have been quicker / easier, but the short working time has me a bit leary that we could get it on correctly.
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Unread 08-18-2006, 09:54 AM   #5
cx
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You might find it easier to finish filling those remaining spots with thinset, Mark. You're close enough for that and the working time will be lots more flexible. You gotta have you some thinset to do the tile anyway, eh?

Go up to the UserCP near the top of the page, find Edit Signature, and put your first name in there for us. It'll put a signature at the bottom of each post so the old people won't forget.
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Unread 08-19-2006, 01:44 AM   #6
claycarson
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SLC is pretty foolproof. You pour it on and roughly pull it out with tool. It seeks it's own level.
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