Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Unread 04-11-2019, 12:57 PM   #1
a_day_with_dave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Where to start with building a curbless shower for this space?

Hey friends, was told to come here but am overwhelmed with all the information. I've added an image with 2x4s where I plan to build half walls with glass above them. I want to make my shower curbless but unsure where to start researching the start to finish steps. Any help would be appreciated, thank you!
Attached Images
 
__________________
David
a_day_with_dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Unread 04-11-2019, 01:17 PM   #2
Kman
Moderator
 
Kman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NW Arkansas, Ozark Mountains
Posts: 12,299
Welcome to the forum, David.

If you're willing to do a mud floor for the shower, then I would cut the joists down 2" in the shower area to allow for the mud. Using a surface-applied sheet membrane for waterproofing would be best.

What do you plan to do on the floor outside the shower? If it's tile, you'll need to take that height into account when determining the height of the shower floor. Having the tile for both parts on hand is best.
__________________
Kevin

The top ten reasons to procrastinate:

1.
Kman is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-11-2019, 01:27 PM   #3
a_day_with_dave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Thanks Kman,

The floor outside of the shower is a water proof laminate from home Depot I just put down. I was planning on leaving it. Could you tell me more about the surface applied sheet membrane? Is there an installation video you could recommend?
__________________
David
a_day_with_dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-11-2019, 02:05 PM   #4
Carbidetooth
Hmmmmm
 
Carbidetooth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 1,685
The "waterproof laminate" seems to be a hot ticket right now. I just had one installed on a remodel in living and dining area. I think they all require space around the perimeter as they are "floating" floors.


That would be a real hard thing to transition into a flush shower floor. You could tuck it under tiled curb and leave the space there but my concern would be that space accumulating water. FWIW, I wouldn't offer either option to a client nor would I do it in my own home.


I think the only way to do it well would be to have all the floor tiled with a membrane underneath. Zero entry poses some real challenges and costs for what you end up with. I'm assuming this is not about wheelchair access.
__________________
Peter

Silicone (not silicon) Sealant Ranger
Carbidetooth is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-11-2019, 02:32 PM   #5
Kman
Moderator
 
Kman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NW Arkansas, Ozark Mountains
Posts: 12,299
Yep, definitely not the flooring I would have chosen to install outside a zero-entry shower. Or any shower for that matter.

It looks like you have the doorway planned at the far end close to the wall. Any chance you might take out the laminate just for that area in front of the door? If you could put tile there over a membrane, it would be easier to seal off the joint between the shower and bathroom floor, and to have a space for water that finds its way outside the shower to collect without the risk of damage.

I'll say first that I have no experience with the waterproof laminate you have there. What I would question is by what function or configuration is it actually waterproof? Is the material itself unaffected by water in its entirety? Are the joints configured such that water can't penetrate them? Is there something between the flooring and the subfloor, like a padding or maybe plastic?

Do you have a link to the flooring product? The forum won't let you post links until you have at least three posts, but if you type the link in and put a space in it somewhere, one of the moderators can fix that and light up the link.
__________________
Kevin

The top ten reasons to procrastinate:

1.
Kman is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-11-2019, 02:32 PM   #6
rmckee84
Registered User
 
rmckee84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 3,016
Like mentioned above you'll have a difficult time making a transition to a barrier free shower with the current flooring. A waterproof membrane like kerdi or hydroban is extended outside of the actual footprint of the shower when attempting an install like you want.
__________________
Jack of most trades, master of none...
Ryan McKee
McKee Construction & Custom Tile
rmckee84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-11-2019, 02:51 PM   #7
a_day_with_dave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Here is a picture of the box. I don't mind switching to tile for the small hallway. Just want to make sure to put the membrane on correctly as that is something I still need to learn about.
Attached Images
  
__________________
David
a_day_with_dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-11-2019, 07:32 PM   #8
Kman
Moderator
 
Kman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NW Arkansas, Ozark Mountains
Posts: 12,299
There are a few out there that you can use. Schluter Kerdi was the first and is probably the most widely used. USG has one, and Custom makes one, although I'm not finding much of a presence of it on their site.

In broad strokes, the membrane is adhered to the walls and floor, and to a special type of drain with a bonding flange on it. The tile then is adhered to the membrane, so that any water that gets past the tile and grout is stopped by the membrane, and either evaporates back out through the tile and grout, or is directed to the drain.

A good feature of the membrane is that it can continue from the shower floor onto the bathroom floor in a solid piece, so that any water that escapes the shower is prevented from entering the subfloor.

A product called Ditra can be adhered to the wood subfloor, and the membrane coming out of the shower is laid over the Ditra. Ditra is waterproof, except for any seams. Tile is installed directly to Ditra. So water has to eventually evaporate out through the tile and grout, since there's nowhere else for it to go once it is stopped by Ditra.
__________________
Kevin

The top ten reasons to procrastinate:

1.
Kman is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-12-2019, 06:26 AM   #9
ss3964spd
Moderator
 
ss3964spd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Fairfax, Va
Posts: 5,231
Send a message via Yahoo to ss3964spd
David, I think you need to first find out if you can take 2 or so inches off the top of those joists without compromising their strength. Visit the "Deflecto" calculator a the top of this page in the dark blue bar.

Assuming for a moment that you can lower the foot print of the shower floor, as the others have mentioned you'll have the very real challenges of extending the water proofing under the LV, getting the tiled area even with the LV area, and sealing the gap between one surface that doesn't move much (tile) and another that does (relative to the tile). It doesn't appear the main footprint of the shower floor is very large, so the opening to it is going to be subject to a lot of water and splashing, so you'd have to water proof the walls to the LV in that area too.

Having recently completed a curbless floor I love the look and what I think will be reduced maintenance. But it is a lot of detailed planning and measuring.
__________________
Dan
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If I recall correctly my memory is excellent, but my ability to access it is intermittent.
ss3964spd is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-12-2019, 08:28 AM   #10
a_day_with_dave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Dan,

What does LV mean?
__________________
David
a_day_with_dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-12-2019, 08:30 AM   #11
a_day_with_dave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Water proofing membrane and glue. Any non toxic options?

I'm getting ready to put down a membrane. This is my first time. I'm told I need to get a membrane glue too which is very toxic even with a mask. Are there any alternative options that are human friendly for water proofing the shower?
__________________
David
a_day_with_dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-12-2019, 08:48 AM   #12
cx
Moderator emeritus
 
cx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Boerne, Texas
Posts: 95,749
What membrane, David? What "glue" are you considering?

Please keep all your project questions on one thread so folks can see what you're working on and what's been previously asked and answered.
__________________
CX

Y'ALL NEW VISITORS READ THIS HERE!
cx is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-12-2019, 08:49 AM   #13
ss3964spd
Moderator
 
ss3964spd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Fairfax, Va
Posts: 5,231
Send a message via Yahoo to ss3964spd
Apologies, David. LV = Luxury Vinyl.
__________________
Dan
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If I recall correctly my memory is excellent, but my ability to access it is intermittent.
ss3964spd is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-12-2019, 09:34 AM   #14
a_day_with_dave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Sorry CX,

I'm not sure yet. Going to home Depot tonight and look at all the options. My friend told me when I get the glue for the membrane it will tell me which mask I need to wear while working with it. However I haven't found a YouTube video with anyone wearing a mask during this process. So I'm wondering if there is a safer product to use. If you have any go to products please let me know.
__________________
David
a_day_with_dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-12-2019, 09:40 AM   #15
rmckee84
Registered User
 
rmckee84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 3,016
The waterproof membranes we are taking about are installed using thinset mortar. I'm not sure what your friend may be referring to. The only option you are likely to find at HD would be redgard. They have a fabric and a liquid option.
Like mentioned Before I prefer laticrete hydroban fabric, or schluter kerdi.
__________________
Jack of most trades, master of none...
Ryan McKee
McKee Construction & Custom Tile
rmckee84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
curbless over concrete. Where to start. Futzy1 Tile Forum/Advice Board 74 07-13-2018 05:53 PM
Help building shower pan start to finish Brian 79 Tile Forum/Advice Board 19 05-05-2018 08:21 PM
Building a Kerdi Mud shower floor from start to finish Guitar1969 Tile Forum/Advice Board 150 07-20-2012 03:25 PM
Building a curbless shower with slate. BamBamBumbolo Tile Forum/Advice Board 17 04-23-2011 12:33 PM
New Shower Quit Reading Start Building Pharris Tile Forum/Advice Board 6 02-12-2003 07:15 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:42 PM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018 John Bridge & Associates, LLC