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Unread 01-25-2007, 06:20 PM   #1
muley
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Need advice on bullnosing

Ok. I have always brought my tile in and had it bullnosed by the local granite shop here. Four years ago it was 5/lf and I charged 10lf. So I made money just carring it to the shop. Well a couple years ago they went to 7/lf, then 10/lf, and now 12/lf and they flat out told me last time, they really didn't care to do it anymore.
So I am going to start doing it myself, it is time. So here are some questions I have. First, do I use the same tool to profile and polish? Second, what is with the polishing pads? What about this buffing compound powder where doers that come in? I am the type that will purchase whatever tool(s) are necessary to get a good job done. I would like to put in a tool order early next week for whatever I need to get this going and done right. How about those tables? I am a total novice in this area all advice is appreciated in advance.
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Unread 01-25-2007, 08:29 PM   #2
prashster
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Can't comment on bullnosing granite tiles, but for a lot of tiles (incl marble) the tool of choice is either a profiling wheel on yr saw or an angle grinder and successively finer grits of sandpaper going wet over 400
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Unread 01-25-2007, 09:01 PM   #3
John Corley
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Which type of stone do you usually wind up doing Muley?

I can walk you through marble, limestone, trav, and granite. They are all different. The only stuff that I don't get great results with is black granite.
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Unread 01-25-2007, 09:01 PM   #4
Jason_Butler
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Hi Muley,

I tried your approach a few years back. Bought an Alpha wet polisher from on online retailer as well as the full set of Alpha wet polishing pads.

I cut the initial granite bullnose with a profile wheel and then polished them with the various pads. If I learned anything, it was that my time was better spent elsewhere. I can't speak for the tables but it is alot of work - very wet work.

Good luck...
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Unread 01-25-2007, 09:21 PM   #5
muley
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So I profile it, then polish? How do I get a 6" profile blade on a 10" saw? Just put on the six and lower the cutting unit? Is it not worth my time? At 13 bucks LF, seems like a could make some coin. What about that Bulldog contraption? As far as what I do most its porcelain, slate, granite, not much marble at all, some travertine. Lately glass, which I do not care for.
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Unread 01-25-2007, 09:35 PM   #6
Hamilton
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Muley buy a profile wheel for your grinder so you dont lose any time
on your tile saw, changing out blades etc.. Heres a link to Contractors Direct,
you can pick one up for almost a $100 less
than what i paid for mine and its a better wheel. Check out
Master Wholesale for drypads. You are going to need a makita
polisher and a 4" velcro cup to mount the pads to, so figure this in to
your spending. I do all of my own bullnosing and these pads should last
you a year or more if used occasionally and (correctly) There is a learning
curve to extending the life of the pads that will only come with experience.
Its worth the money to buy the tools and learn to DIY. Good luck.
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Unread 01-26-2007, 01:09 AM   #7
muley
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Ok, Hamilton, so how do I profile a straight line off of my grinder? Not being a smart arse, but I don't trust myself to keep a tight edge that way. Secondly, I have a couple 10" saws and planned on doing the bullnosing/edging in shop, so maybe a profile wheel on opne of the ten inchers in shop? I'll go the grinder route, but dang I don't trust my unsteady hands. Do the dry pads connect to the velcro cup on the Makita wet polisher? So are you polishing wet or dry?

Last edited by muley; 01-26-2007 at 01:42 AM.
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Unread 01-26-2007, 01:30 AM   #8
muskymike
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Hi Muley, I have a profile blade and a wet polisher and some hand pads. Right now I am making bullnose out of limestone for this job I'm doing. I profile the edge then use the hand pads to polish it. It's not as shiny as the face but it looks good. The home owner wanted to save a few bucks. Personally I think it's a PITA. Especially when you hafta make 90 pieces.
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Unread 01-26-2007, 09:00 AM   #9
NVC
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Hi Muley,

I do my own edges also and but use a dry diamond pad set-up via 'Braxton & Bragg' (Gen-X brand). I also use a bull nosing bench that clamps the tops along the same plane. I believe it's called 'Edge-rite' at Master Tool Wholesale. A guy could make his own bench, but this thing is fast, light, and collapses down pretty small (and that costs ya)

I use a diamond cup wheel (non-segmented) to knock off the corner and rough out the shape, then go to the diamond pads. That usually will bring it to factory shine, but some stone may need to be hit with the buffing wheel and a little stone polishing compound.

hope this helps,
Mark
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Unread 01-26-2007, 09:22 AM   #10
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Hi Muley

Check out the Wet polishing thread we had over in the cleaning forum a while ago. John & I gave a few pointers on there. The topic has also been discussed fairly in depth and I'm sure if you do a search on the forum, you'll find a bunch more really good tips & tricks.
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Unread 01-27-2007, 09:24 AM   #11
michaelhazuka
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Quote:
What about that Bulldog contraption?
If you seriously do huge amounts of profiling, then the Bulldog by Raimondi is the tool to get. If you only have small amounts of profiling to do(maybe a shower or two a month with stone), then save your money.

A very large retailer in my city owns that machine, and I spent four days profiling and polishing 600 linear feet of bullnosed marble for a hospital remodel to match an existing bullnosed base. 600 feet of bullnose took me all of four days to cut, profile, and polish with grinder polishing discs.

The advantage of the machine is that it secures each piece of tile in place profiles a uniform edge on each piece without having the tile stray in any direction. Micro-adjustments can be made to take more or less off in each pass, but once the machine is set you can profile as fast as you can place the tile on the Bulldog.

I spent one day cutting the marble down to 3 7/8" and also profiling the stone. I spent the next three days polishing all the pieces. The whole profiling job was bid out at $12/linear foot and I went through four packages of polishing pads(coarse-fine abrasions).

600 linear feet x $12/foot=$7200 for one man in four days...pretty good money.

I'll post the link to the bulldog later......


http://www.raimondiusa.com/BullDog.htm
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Unread 01-27-2007, 09:51 AM   #12
michaelhazuka
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Whilst(for Ainsley) watching the demo on the machine, I realized that the Bulldog has polishing blade attachments from coarse down to fine....that in itself would have saved one full day on that entire project.

It is quite the little machine.......
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Unread 01-27-2007, 10:06 AM   #13
muley
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Well, I'm one of those "tool buyers". I personally believe in getting the best tools possible for the job. I am also a "stocker", I like having stock items that we use regularly. Nothing is worse than being on a job and not having the best equipment, except of course going some where undergunned. When I set out to buy tools, I buy whatever I need, and the best tools possible. So if I'm going to get into polishing, I want to go with good tools. Monday afternoon, I'll be ordering the Makita system and probably the table from contractors Direct, looks like around a 1000 to get going.
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Unread 01-27-2007, 01:30 PM   #14
customceramicsllc
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no need for a new thread but similar question,
im working on 18x18 limestone and was wondering the best way to bullnose.
i have a profile blade for my mk and i have the dry pad polishers for my dewalt grinder,i can also get my hands on a sander and do the grit method.
whats the opinions?
thx
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Unread 01-27-2007, 02:09 PM   #15
JoeC
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I have had a MK profile wheel for 15 years, but I rarely use it anymore because of a continual problem I run into. I used it on my MK 101, but the table slanted down and the bullnose wheel was always farther up at the edge away from table . Then I got a Target, but it's still a challenge to get a straight even cut on the bullnose edge. then I bought an Alpha wheel for my Makita, but edges are kind of wavy. So I am using a grinding stone and polishing pads till I can find something better. How much is it for the Raimondi bulldog? Anyone use the Carver saw and router setup? JoeC
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