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Unread 12-05-2006, 09:09 PM   #16
dbol
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what type of price are we talking about for spectralock and the spectralock pro?
Any Idea how much I would need for 600 ft of 8x8 Quarry tiles with base.
Thanks for the valuable info.
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Unread 12-05-2006, 09:19 PM   #17
Rob Z
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Shaughhn,

Glad I could help!
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Unread 12-05-2006, 09:20 PM   #18
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Doug

The Laticrete website has tables for estimating quantities of the various grouts.
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Unread 12-05-2006, 09:30 PM   #19
Shaughnn
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Doug,
Assume 60 square feet for each full unit and then factor in another couple of units for waste and touch ups. My cost here in Seattle for a full unit of SprectraLOCK Pro is about $75.00. So, without sales tax I think you are looking at close to $900 for grout, if you can use the SpectraLOCK Pro. If you have to use another 100% solids epoxy I think it's gonna cost you a bit more. Don't forget also to factor in consumables like sponges and gloves and doodlebug pads. I think that's about $.15 per foot, or about $90 on top of the grout.
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Unread 12-06-2006, 05:51 AM   #20
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big help!
thanks a ton!
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Unread 12-06-2006, 07:36 AM   #21
tileguytodd
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Doug, if there is no huge issue regarding chemicals etc then a solids is actually overkill and a modified would be Just fine and far easier to work with in the end. (cost is a little less also)

I have not heard of ANY state that has issued ANY code calling for Epoxy in food prep area's.
At least not yet.

Likely if anyone does it will be California first.

It is easy enough to find out with a simple Phone call to your government center
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Unread 12-06-2006, 09:04 AM   #22
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Hi Todd,

It's my understanding that epoxy grout in food prep areas is 'code' here (in CA). I think it's in Health Code/Dept. rather than Building.
Something to the effect of being non-absorbant and 'scrubbable'

I've never seen it in writing, but I've never seen anything but epoxy in food prep areas and given the cost of epoxy, I'd think somebody would have tried to avoid it.

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Likely if anyone does it will be California first.
Ain't that the truth. How come we have the bounty of law-makers here?

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Unread 12-06-2006, 09:18 AM   #23
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Mark,
It's "consumer protections", not lawmakers that put California at the vangard. I don't know anyone that would want to eat at a restaurant that didn't have epoxy-grouted floors but nobody wants to be the one to pay to put them in.
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Unread 12-06-2006, 12:18 PM   #24
RedRock
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Food on the floor?

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I don't know anyone that would want to eat at a restaurant that didn't have epoxy-grouted floors
If the cook is serving food off the floors, I won't eat there, regardless of the type of grout used! Years ago, I worked on a remodel job at a local restaurant. The kitchen floor was nasty and the pots and pans had crust in them. The locals raved about the food. Maybe its just best to eat it and smile - ignorance is bliss.

But, code is code is code, its better to do it right the first time then have to do it over again.
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Unread 12-06-2006, 12:24 PM   #25
Shaughnn
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Juan,
Once you've had to do remodel work in a food prep area, you know the value of epoxy grout. Aside of ease of cleaning, the epoxy also prevents bacteria from penetrating the subsurface and festering. Got a knick once from a non-epoxy floor during a remodel and my arm and hand swelled up to obscure all my joints. My arm looked like one great big ANGRY sausage and three weeks of anti-biotics later it finally subsided. People prepared food for other people in that place and it was NOT a cheap place to eat.
If it's not code in your area, every single person reading this thread should start a campaign to make it so.
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Unread 12-06-2006, 04:59 PM   #26
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Shaughnn, I didn't mean to be lighthearted about using epoxy grout, on the contrary, sanitation in a food establishment should be priority for construction.

(I just found humor in the correlation between eating food and floor construction. )

FYI ... here is what I found in Utah code for food establishements. Notice that it does not specify type of grout - although "smooth durable material" could be interpreted in a number of ways.
R70-530-7. Physical Facilities (As in effect on November 1, 2006.)
7-1. Materials for Construction and Repair.
(ii) Floors.

(A) Floors and floor coverings of all food preparation, food storage, and warewashing areas, and the floors of all walk-in refrigerators, dressing rooms, locker rooms, toilet rooms and vestibules, shall be constructed of smooth durable material such as sealed concrete, terrazzo, quarry tile, ceramic tile, durable grades of vinyl asbestos or plastic tile, or tight-fitting wood impregnated with plastic, and shall be maintained in good repair. Nothing in this section shall prohibit the use of anti-slip floor covering in areas where necessary for safety reasons.

(B) Floors which are water flushed or which receive discharges of water or other fluid wastes or are in areas where pressure spray methods for cleaning are used, shall be provided with properly installed trapped drains. Such floors shall be constructed only of sealed concrete, terrazzo, quarry tile, ceramic tile, or similar materials and shall be graded to drain. The floor and wall junctures shall be coved and sealed.

(C) In all establishments utilizing concrete, terrazzo, quarry tile, ceramic tile, or similar flooring materials, or where water flush cleaning methods are used, the junctures between walls and floors shall be coved and sealed. In all other cases, the juncture between walls and floors shall be coved so as not to present an open seam of more than 1/32 inch (1 mm).
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Unread 12-06-2006, 05:35 PM   #27
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Juan, take it from a guy who went broke in the restaurant business. Haven't you ever heard of the "three second rule"? Use the long spatula. Get it off the floor within three seconds, and it's servable. Longer than that and you have to toss it.
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Unread 12-06-2006, 05:39 PM   #28
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My wife used to be a chef and has confessed to me that there is a 5 second rule in most commercial kitchens. She would never do it,Oh No not her, but you would be surprised at how many others regard this rule as acceptable. Just think, newbie waitress walks in through the out door, collides with server, oops steak meets floor,0ne-two-three-four got it! server rushes back to the chef with 4 sec. steak, chef throws it back on the grill, 7 sec. each side, this is what is called a safty measure. Voila! ready to be served.
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Unread 12-06-2006, 05:41 PM   #29
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Oh yeah, steak may also be wiped or rinsed before going back on the grill. You Know just to get the chunks off, like hair or stray spagetti pieces. or loose grout from floor tiles.
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Unread 12-06-2006, 05:53 PM   #30
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Peter, you dine in lower class greasy spoons than I do.
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