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Unread 02-15-2007, 04:02 PM   #1
spain29
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(1) Making the wall around a tub and (2) wonderboard vs. hardiebacker

How do you build a wall that surrounds a tub? I was planning on using either wonderboard or hardiebacker, but a friend said that I would have to put that on top of greenboard. In other words, it would be stud, greenboard, then wonderboard/hardiebacker. I hadn't heard that before. I thought it was just stud, felt, wonderboard/hardiebacker, then tile. Also, another friend says he just uses greenboard and tile, and he's never had a problem.

Is the adhesive for tiling on wonderboard/hardiebacker different from adhesive on greenboard?

Which one is better: wonderboard or hardiebacker? I want something that will last since moisture seems to build up in this small area. Also, this is my first tile project, so something easy to use would be helpful.

Thanks!
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Unread 02-15-2007, 07:02 PM   #2
Davestone
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You're right, your friend who has never had a problem wit greenboard prolly ain't done much greenboard.I've seen some last years, and othrs last one year,depending on usage.Which is best? I dunno, i use Hardi cause it seems easier to work with.Don't use premix or mastic, use thinset.
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Unread 02-15-2007, 07:14 PM   #3
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Hello, I'm not a pro but I could start you out by saying you are right about the felt(vapor barrier), cementboard, and tile. There are also other ways like regular drywall, Kerdi, then tile. Neither one of your friends suggestions is correct. Greenboard should never be used under tile in a wet area like a shower.
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Unread 02-15-2007, 07:43 PM   #4
nicholastileco
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I prefer 1/2" hardibacker on the walls myself. Its easier to cut and easier to work on. It doesnt crumble on the edges and when cutting, like wonderboard tends to do.

Also, you do not need to put greenboard up first. Barrier yes, greenboard no. Another tip is to take a 4' level and put it against your studs and check for any bows or uneveness. You'll save yourself some headaches by getting everything plum and level before you install your CBU
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Unread 02-15-2007, 07:52 PM   #5
Hamilton
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Hi spain.

You can do this either of 2 ways. First forget about tiling over green
board its no good. You can in fact put greenboard over studs, felt or
poly followed by a cbu. *The water barrier needs to be installed over
the greenboard*. If you do it this way you will have a prep job that
is setup for a mud cap or conventional trim and should be planned for
ahead of time. If you go the other route you can install felt or poly
to the studs and then cbu, 1/2" cbu will be flush with surrounding
sheetrock in most cases. In this scenario look for a surface bullnose
trim vs the mud cap. This also should be planned out in advance before
selecting tile as not all tiles have all styles of trims.
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Unread 02-15-2007, 09:20 PM   #6
iiigoiii
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some installers will put the thinner hardibacker over wallboard - a bad idea. the thicker (1/2") backerboards are designed to be able to span normal stud distances without having additional support behind them. of course, do use a vapor barrier.

a couple of notes on the hardibacker vs durock debate... some people think hardibacker is easier to cut. durock can be cut very cleanly if scored on both sides, but that takes extra time.

also, i found out that hardibacker can wick water. someone mentioned that in a shower pan, the bottom of hardibacker should not be trapped by the shower pan because it can wick water. i called the james hardy company directly on this, and finally got to a technician. he said that it should not be used that way because of wicking/saturation problems AND mold! i mentioned that was odd considering all the hardibacker samples they show floating in water for years and having all the "exclusive Moldblock™ Technology" hooha. he couldn't answer. i use durock on walls.

hardibacker does however have better compressive strength and thus is better for floors.

hope this helps.
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Unread 02-26-2007, 01:58 PM   #7
spain29
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Making holes in Hardiback

I'm a novice home improvement person with very few tools. I am using Hardiback and tiles for the walls around the tub. A friend is willing to cut the tiles for me, but I'm on my own for the Hardiback. How do I cut holes in the Hardiback for my fixtures? I'm willing to buy a tool if need be, but hopefully it won't be that expensive. Thanks.
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Unread 02-26-2007, 02:03 PM   #8
ddmoit
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I cut holes in mine with a regular hole saw. I did it outside, with a mask. It's a nasty, dusty affair.
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Unread 02-26-2007, 02:12 PM   #9
Mike2
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Most wood working tools will do just fine. Ask your friend if he/she has a power drill. A cheap hole saw could be found for 5 bucks or so up to a certain diameter. For larger holes a hand type keyhole saw often used for drywall could be found for under $10.

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Unread 02-26-2007, 02:14 PM   #10
nforcer2
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hardibacker is really easy to cut but i think the hole saw would be easiest. if you dont want to buy one simply trace the area you need to cut, go over it a few times with a razor knife and then knock it out with a hammer. it isnt the best way to do it, but it will work.
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Unread 02-26-2007, 02:41 PM   #11
Dave Taylor
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And yet another way to cut holes in Hardi.....

If yer' hole(s) needs to be larger.... position and trace the hole size on the Hardi with a pencil.... drill a 3/8" - 1/2" hole on the inside of the hole line somewhere towards the center of the hole... and use a hand held jig saw with a carbide blade (available at Lowes or Home Depot).... or even a metal or wood blade will work. Jest put the blade in the jig saw, then position the blade in the hole you previously drilled and start cutting tracing the line.

The jig saw wont churn up too much dust but it may help to cut the Hardi outside somewhere. Wear safety glasses and don't breathe in whatever small amount of dust is raised.

Hope this helps

PS: Or you kin' jest' drill a bunch of holes around the inside of the line then knock the scrap piece out.
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Unread 02-26-2007, 07:01 PM   #12
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PS: Or you kin' jest' drill a bunch of holes around the inside of the line then knock the scrap piece out.
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What Dave said.....That is what I did because I didn't know any better. It worked fine. I did use a masonry bit in the drill.
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Unread 03-07-2007, 04:53 PM   #13
spain29
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Roofing felt with tub

I got different advice as to how far down the roofing felt should go. Should I glue the roofing felt to the top of tub or have it fall behind the tub all the way down to the floor? If it's the first, what should I use to glue it to the tub and should I be able to see the roofing felt after I screw in the Hardiback? Thanks.
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Unread 03-07-2007, 05:09 PM   #14
Marge
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Hi Spain (Not your first name right??), welcome to the forum.

I have merged your three threads as they pertain to the same project. We appreciate having all posts about one project on one thread. Helps us keep track of what's happening. If you would like to rename this thread to something more applicable overall, just let me know and we'll take care of that for you.

As for your roofing felt...the felt is your barrier against water behind the tile. You do not want it all the way to the floor. Run it over the front edge of the tub flange under the cbu. Don't worry about making it exact as you can trim it with a utility knife to the correct length later. It is not glued to the flange.

Good luck!
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Unread 03-07-2007, 05:26 PM   #15
spain29
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If there is no adhesive/glue, how does the roofing felt stay over the front edge of the tub flange under the cbu? Is there something else I should use?
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