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Unread 08-16-2020, 08:33 AM   #61
arnav
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss3964spd
Another option instead of PT? Hang poly sheeting over the block, then install the furring strips.
I previously also used PVC trim as an intermediately layer (not for showers though). I wonder if you could also just redgaurd a strip on the wall as well.
The concern in my case though is more the termites as oppose to moisture (there is a termite hot-spot right above the shower).
I am going to treat the attic for termites myself with what the pros use (termidor + boracare) once a year as oppose to every 5. Finished the whole thing myself a few weeks back. The exterminator said that using regualr lumber is not an issue as long as you treat the wood (and in fact the entire attic is regular lumber) but treating the wood in a shower regularly will be impossible. Why they build wooden roofs in FL is beyond me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ss3964spd
Is a challenge to find 2X2's that are straight, or remain straight. Especially PT 2X2's.
Absolutely. When I re did the drywall in the entire house myself, the last 1/3 of some furring strips was bowed a few good inches. If you miss a screw here and there and have to re-drive it, who cares. In a shower however, when using poly, I am assuming we want to minimize the number of holes in the CBU...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ss3964spd
How are you going to handle the washers and nail heads being proud of the surface of the strips?
Thank you for reminding me. I was going to ask that. Since you bring it up, I am assuming it is going to be an issue. The options I see are:
1. Remove the washers of the nails. This should allow me to drive the nails much further in.
2. Use a Forstner drill bit (or the like) to bore a hole for the nails. If I end up using the PT lumber as oppose to the ply, i would need to drill a pilot hole anyway
3. Furr the 3/4" KDAT ply with 1/4" regular ply between the nails

What do you think?
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Unread 08-16-2020, 11:03 AM   #62
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1. Do not do #1. But give it a try once so's you'll understand why not.

2. You could do that, I suppose, if your gun is such that you can align it properly and if you have enough wood thickness to deal with it.

3. That sounds like the better option to me. I'd wanna glue those thin strips on there real well. Maybe do the gluing before installing and just leave a wide gap where you plan to shoot your nails?

Dan's suggestion of using regular KD lumber for your shims is OK except it prevents the ability to glue the strips to the wall, which I wouldn't wanna do without. If you were to make a full spread of good construction adhesive on the back of those strips it might work as well as the poly Dan's suggesting. I have actually done that with curb boards on concrete SOG in past when I had no KDAT available. Smear a full spread of PL Premium on the back of the bottom board, let that cure overnight and then glue and ramset or Tapcon the 2x4 to the slab. As good as using roofing felt or SilSeal? Can't prove it, but I think probably so.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 08-16-2020, 11:25 AM   #63
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Thanks for all the advice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CX
Do not do #1. But give it a try once so's you'll understand why not.
oh oh. Thanks for the warning. I wonder what application the pins without washers are for then (which is how I got the idea). In fact they seems to have more no-washer varieties than ones with washers. I can imagine that perhaps the washers help contain the gas in the chamber, therefore creating more pressure in the barrel (dunno just a guess)?
I would have originally gotten nails without washers altogether, but the galvanized ones only come with washers (and they are attached to it pretty good as well).
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Unread 08-16-2020, 11:53 AM   #64
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You want the washers to keep the pins from just trying to go alla way through the wood and either not fastening it well or splitting it, pilot hole or no. I've just never found it to work well. But maybe you'll like it. Doesn't cost much to give it a try.

Heavier loads will sometimes allow you to set the heads nearly flush with 2x material surface, washer and all. It's usually a bit of a crap shoot until you've tried a few fasteners with your chosen pieces and given backing material. Once you get the right load you can get fairly consistent results, but I find there is usually some variation between shots.

Only time I've used the pins without washers is to fasten steel pieces to concrete.

And for real fun, try shooting into some seriously hard rocks.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 08-19-2020, 11:18 AM   #65
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For 3/8" thick marble, will 1/2" Schluter Trim work?

1/2" (trim) - 3/8" (tile) - ~1/8" thinset = 0

But Schluter recommends having the trim be 1mm smaller plus I will be using an anti-lippage system for the first time which i think results in more thinset being required for the % coverage. I think the Thinset can end up being 1/8" to 1/4" thick. I haven't done any dry runs yet (the leveling system is in the mail...)

Safe bet or hold off until I lay a few test tiles?

Maybe go up to 5/8" trim?
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Unread 08-19-2020, 12:36 PM   #66
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On a wall, the profile is usually placed against the wall after thinset is burned into the surface so that layer is miniscule. THen, more thinset is added and combed, so that the profile itself isn't adding much over whatever the nominal thickness of the thinset is elsewhere. The thickness of the thinset will be the same as elsewhere through the cutouts, but minimal after setting the tile above the profile.

When used on a floor, you prep the floor and thinset, press the profile into it, add some more on top of the profile, then set your tile, so there tends to be a bit more thinset in that situation, but not much as the excess flows up out of the openings in the profile, and once the tile is set flat, again, the amount of thinset on top of the profile is minimal.

So, when installing on a wall, there's almost none underneath the profile, only what you've burned in. When setting on a floor, you press the profile into the combed thinset, but because it is fairly narrow, and has all of those holes in it, the main body gets pushed almost to the surface below. Schluter has been selling profiles for about 30-years...their recommendations generally are correct.
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Unread 08-19-2020, 02:54 PM   #67
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I think the penny finally dropped. Their profile sizes are a measure of the part of the profile that will "sit/hug" the tile, not overall profile edge height. That means that for 3/8" tile 1/2" trim is too big (let alone 5/8), and that I most likely simply need 3/8" trim.

I tiled two bathrooms before but I am new to anything schluter

These from the schluter website helped as well:
https://sccpublic.s3-external-1.amaz..._jolly_imp.pdf
https://sccpublic.s3-external-1.amaz...d-nt-jolly.jpg
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Unread 08-21-2020, 11:34 AM   #68
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Schluter trim transition from wall to tiled baseboard trim

1. If you tile the tub's walls first, and don't know the final height of the floor and tiled baseboards and need to transition to a trim on the baseboard, what do you do?

i) Leave the trim a little long by the floor and cut in place against the wall with a dremel on a slow speed once the floor is tiled?
ii) Tile the bathroom floors first?

2. There are no corners for the Jolly right? You miter instead yeah?
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Unread 08-21-2020, 11:59 AM   #69
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1. Don't understand the question. Don't know what you might mean by "trim on the baseboard."

2. I know of no available corners for Jolly, but you might wanna visit the Schluter website for the product to verify that. Or call the mother ship: 800-472-4588.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 08-21-2020, 12:28 PM   #70
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Opps, here is what I meant:

"tiled baseboard" = tiles cut to 1/3 of the original tile and placed against the wall perpendicular to the floor like baseboards would on drywall

"Trim on tiled baseboards" = Schluter trim placed over above tiles...

Basically the question is about the transition from the wall trim to the floor trim...

Maybe I am over thinking it. I guess you could stage it. Place CBU + tile + 1/8 spacer etc' to account for the final height of the floor and "tiled baseboard"

Apologies for the lingo
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Unread 08-21-2020, 08:43 PM   #71
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I just read through the entire "Fusion Pro grout feedback request/input" thread.

My reward? Seeing on page 4 that CX is not nearly as grouchy/intimidating as his Avatar makes it seems like.
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Unread 08-21-2020, 09:13 PM   #72
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Well, I been called a lot of things over the years, Dan, many of them not at all flattering, but I think that's the first time I've every heard "intimidating." The grouchy is fairly accurate, though.

That avatar, by the way, was assigned to me by one of my former business partners here, either DaveM or Flatfloor. DaveM always says it was Flatfloor, but that's because Flatfloor's dead and Dave doesn't wanna take responsibility. I've always found it too appropriate to change.
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Unread 08-21-2020, 09:28 PM   #73
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I figured there is history there...

I was gonna go with "CX is a handsome fella contrary to what his avatar suggests - or at least was back in 2012" but didn't want to break any forum rules or get banned

Opps...
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Unread 09-01-2020, 08:16 PM   #74
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Ramset nails without washers

Quote:
Originally Posted by cx
You want the washers to keep the pins from just trying to go alla way through the wood and either not fastening it well or splitting it, pilot hole or no. I've just never found it to work well. But maybe you'll like it. Doesn't cost much to give it a try.
Only time I've used the pins without washers is to fasten steel pieces to concrete.
Yes, i see it now. I tried it for myself and it doesn't work... This is old hard mortar which with a mastershot requires two shots. The second shot (even with lower power level) pushes it too far in.

Using plywood instead of dimensional lumber for furring strips is just genius. I don't know why they don't do it down here (especially given HD does carry KDAT ply). No splitting, no drilling holes. Goes through it like butter and holds it so well. Thx!
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Unread 09-01-2020, 09:14 PM   #75
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Demo - Day 1

Started to demo and oh

Here is what it looks like after 18 years of tiling over greenboard. The mfr. date on the tub confirms no renovation since the house was built.
Granted the builder will say why I am complaining if it lasted for so long, but the damage is clear and the renovation is more complex now.
Perfect timing on the renovation. It was on its last leg. The back wall literally crumbled out.
Ironically the 1 * 2 furring strips are in a good shape and are tempting to reuse.
Taking the tub out required some wiggling so I can see putting the new one in being a production especially to avoid damage.
I already removed the rusty studs that stiffen the king studs.

1. Can I just replace the rusty portion of the studs or does the whole thing go out?
I have done whole stud in-place replacement like that before and its fine (I just nailed it from the opposite side and patched the nails). However, on the shower head side, supply lines, drainage line, and electricity goes through the studs. Can you "sister"/insert a another stud instead of the rusty portion? This is a 6" stud so maybe using a 4" stud?

2. More importantly, as you can see the underlayment and sub-floor by the tub are gone. Water and termite damage (yuck). What's the protocol to replace these? I hope i don't need to remove walls and replace whole 8*4 sheets... I don't know the first thing about underlayment/sub-floors

Toilet and vanity are coming out tomorrow.

Thx for all the help
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