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Unread 10-03-2019, 07:43 PM   #46
Gozo
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Go ahead and use a stapler. You would need a nail with a decent head so the cardboard doesn’t rip through. That thickness of the head would be almost as much as the shim. More so with a screw.
I found that often I needed a shim torn down a bit as the wonkiness of the stud was only in part of it. Sometimes double or triple thickness is some areas. The stapler made it easy to add another layer or pull one off if too much. After, I just tapped the staples flush with a hammer. You’ll want a long straightedge to gauge flatness up and down as well as across multiple studs. Also use some leather gloves to keep your hand from getting chewed up from constantly squeezing the thing. One hand to push the end of the stapler into the stud, the other to squeeze the trigger. They do make staplers with the trigger hinge over the business end that would do both with one hand, but they’re more expensive.
I made a wedge of about 5 or 6 shims to use as a thickness tester so I’d know how thick to go and where and that way it didn’t come out looking as much like a patchwork job. Did get the walls damn flat though.
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Unread 10-03-2019, 07:59 PM   #47
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I knew I had a pic with some shims in place. You can see the shim wedge I mentioned on the ledge at the bottom of the picture. Looks like I only used 4; see how the memory fades over the years.... The shims are in place on a bunch of studs as this was going to be the main tiles walls and I wanted them flat as a pool table.
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Unread 10-03-2019, 08:15 PM   #48
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Depends on the shim density, and thickness.

The staple has to be able to penetrate the shim, and long enough to go into the stud about 1/4" or more.

Keep in mind, it just has to hold in place until the board is on the wall. You can put a screw through the board and shim when finishing up.
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Unread 10-04-2019, 05:49 AM   #49
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Thanks Jeff, Kevin.
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Unread 10-04-2019, 06:24 AM   #50
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I also used a stapler on my cardboard shims, and I recommend you use one also. As I found while working across the walls I'd add a series of shims - sometimes needing more than one on a stud. When I thought I had them right I'd check again with a straight edge only to find I needed to remove one. Lots of trial and error, but using the staples made it easy to add or subtract.

But if you still don't want to use a stapler I think aluminum roofing nails would probably work, the heads are pretty thin.
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Unread 10-04-2019, 09:13 AM   #51
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Plus one on the advice that you need to keep double checking your work. Seems like you've got it perfect after adding shims.....only to double check and see that it's not as aligned as you thought.


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Unread 10-04-2019, 11:23 AM   #52
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Thanks, I will choose a staple gun that can accept large enough staples for this...

What is your opinion about removing the nail guards (metal plates) -- you can see one of them below the "B" tag in the attached photo. The plumber put them in after repiping with PEX, but now I'm concerned they're going to get in the way of shimming.
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Unread 10-04-2019, 11:33 AM   #53
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I would avoid that if possible. It's very easy to forget where those lines are and put a screw through them.

And the worst part about that, if a screw just barely penetrates the line, it'll start seeping, but you won't notice it for a long time until it opens up some more and really starts leaking...after you've completed your project.

Shim directly above and below the plate, and even over it if need be, but try not to remove it.
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Unread 10-04-2019, 11:40 AM   #54
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Definitely leave those plates in place and shim around.
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Unread 10-04-2019, 12:05 PM   #55
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You might consider removing the plates, notching the studs to the depth of the plates, then reinstalling them.

I had a mess of them.
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Unread 10-04-2019, 07:53 PM   #56
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OK, it sounds like I should keep them and just chisel it down so their flush. Thanks.
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Unread 10-04-2019, 08:21 PM   #57
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Have had to do that many times when wallboard wanted to be flat, John. Just another one of those things that makes a remodeling job the fun that it is.

Only thing worse than having those nail plates is not having those nail plates.
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Unread 10-05-2019, 09:07 AM   #58
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OK thanks, I will dremel and chisel out those areas and put the the guards back in...

When I am attaching 1/4 inch plywood furring strips to studs (someone pulled electrical cords taut across the studs and notched them in one side of wall, so I don't think I can fit sister studs there) to build them out, is there a specific type of screw I should use for this? I was going to use some exterior deck screws that I have already...or is that wrong? Should I just use the same Backer On screws that I will eventually be using for the boards? Thanks!
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Unread 10-05-2019, 09:40 AM   #59
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I like to install my plywood furring strips or shims with a bead of construction adhesive and minimum mechanical fasteners (usually some 18ga. pneumatic brads) just to hold the strips in place whilst the adhesive sets.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-06-2019, 09:54 AM   #60
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OK thanks, adhesive sounds like the way to go...and I own a brad nailer too.
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