Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Unread 09-15-2019, 02:12 PM   #16
pirates712
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 11
Thanks for the clarification, I wasn't sure if you meant

"The half wall [is expected to] deflect as it stands"

or

"The half wall will deflect [too much] as it stands]"
__________________
Ethan
pirates712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-15-2019, 02:23 PM   #17
ss3964spd
Moderator
 
ss3964spd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Fairfax, Va
Posts: 2,149
Send a message via Yahoo to ss3964spd
Wording can be everything. LOL. Sorry if mine caused confusion.

Is that a gang of 3 switches back there in the corner of the toilet area?
__________________
Dan
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If I recall correctly my memory is excellent, but my ability to access it is intermittent.
ss3964spd is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-15-2019, 02:30 PM   #18
pirates712
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 11
Yes it is, they have one 14/2 coming up from the basement plus four 14/2's and a 14/3 going up to the attic. They used to control the exhaust fan, the light above the toilet, and the light in the shower, but I've rewired those lights to be on an existing switch at the entrance to the bathroom. Now these switches control the new humidity sensing exhaust fan (humidity sensing on/off and manual on/off, plus a night light).
__________________
Ethan
pirates712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-15-2019, 03:24 PM   #19
ss3964spd
Moderator
 
ss3964spd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Fairfax, Va
Posts: 2,149
Send a message via Yahoo to ss3964spd
The night light is a good idea. I have one right next to the toilet, on a motion and light sensor.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Dan
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If I recall correctly my memory is excellent, but my ability to access it is intermittent.
ss3964spd is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-20-2019, 03:32 PM   #20
pirates712
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 11
Yesterday I installed my pre slope.

I used quickcrete sand topping mix without any added sand, mixed in four batches of one bag with 2.25 quarts of water. This resulted in a mix which I could easily squeeze into a ball with my hand, leaving my hand clean, but also broke apart easily. I wanted to add a little more water, but resisted the urge.

I started by forming a level perimeter in the back half of the shower, filing in to the drain, then forming a level perimeter in the front half then filling. When finished, I misted the bed with water then covered it with plastic.

I'm mostly happy with how it turned out. Its pitched to the drain at all points, which is the most important thing, the perimeter is level, and the slope is mostly consistent. However, there are some defects I would like to avoid when it comes time to do the final slope.

- There is some shallow spalling in some areas. I think this is a result of taking too long to work the material - I spent a total of around 2 hours, which averages 30 minutes per batch. I think taking too long resulted in some sub-optimal bonding where "old" met "new".

- I made sure to pack the material *very* well. I used a 3" by 15" float, and it left marks that I was not able to smooth out with my finishing trowel. I think for the final slope I will use a wider, shorter float to pack.

Pictures are attached, taking about 26 hours after finishing yesterday. I'm planning on skimming the pre slope with thinset to fill in the spalling and float marks before installing the liner, but I want to do a better job on the final slope. Any advice/wisdom is appreciated.
Attached Images
     
__________________
Ethan
pirates712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-20-2019, 03:52 PM   #21
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 31,758
Without the added sand, the mud is harder to work with. You can also carve the mud using a 1x2 or 1x3. I usually keep 2 or 3 1x3's handy that are different lengths. A longer stick to reach the corners is handy and helps keep the corners from getting too flat. Also, on your final mud bed, to keep the mud from eroding, slick it down with your steel trowel before you walk away from it.

Before truing up with thinset and adding the pan liner, I would rub the mud with a rub brick to knock off any high spots and crumbs. Then vacuum it well.
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com

Last edited by Davy; 10-20-2019 at 03:57 PM.
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-20-2019, 03:56 PM   #22
cx
Da Home Builder
 
cx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Boerne, Texas
Posts: 88,415
You really don't wanna use that mix for your final mud bed, Ethan. You can use most anything you can manage to shape for your pre-slope, but the final mud bed needs to function properly and that means it must be sufficiently porous to allow water to pass quickly through it. The 3:1 Sand Topping mix won't do that. You need to mix in enough sand to make it a 5:1 mix. There's a formula in the Shower Construction thread in the Liberry.

Can't tell for sure about your blocking between the studs, but your waterproofing membrane must rise a minimum of 3 inches above your curb.

My opinion; worth price charged.
__________________
CX

Y'ALL NEW VISITORS READ THIS HERE!
cx is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-20-2019, 04:05 PM   #23
pirates712
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 11
Rodger that cx, I will use the 5:1 mix for the final slope. Since I'll have extra sand topping mix, I'll take the opportunity to do some practicing
__________________
Ethan
pirates712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-20-2019, 05:33 PM   #24
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 31,758
Cx mentioned the blocking, looks like you have 2x6's. You might want to add a 2x4 to the top of them, that way you can get the CBU nails up a little higher. I would also notch the studs the bottom foot and beat the blocking back even with the notches. That will help keep the pan liner from bulging out the CBU along the bottom. The notching is covered in the shower construction thread.
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-20-2019, 05:54 PM   #25
pirates712
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 11
Isn't just screwing the CBU to the studs sufficient?

I'm ok with the CBU bulging out slightly at the bottom, I can't bring myself to notch the studs of an exterior load bearing wall.
__________________
Ethan
pirates712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-20-2019, 06:59 PM   #26
cx
Da Home Builder
 
cx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Boerne, Texas
Posts: 88,415
You're not likely to be "ok with the CBU bulging out slightly at the bottom" come time to set your wall tiles.

Notching the bottom of your studs an eighth of an inch, or even a quarter-inch in the corners, is not going to affect the the structure of your load-bearing exterior walls, Ethan, and you're gonna find life a lot easier with installing your wallboard and tile.

My opinion; worth price charged.
__________________
CX

Y'ALL NEW VISITORS READ THIS HERE!
cx is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-20-2019, 07:28 PM   #27
Kman
Moderator
 
Kman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NW Arkansas, Ozark Mountains
Posts: 10,926
If you can't bring yourself to notch the studs, you can shim everything above one foot. It's more work, but if it helps you sleep at night....

And I've found that half a 60lb bag of sand topping mix and half a 50lb bag of sand works out to about 5 1/2 to one ratio, which actually works pretty well for a shower floor. It's less sticky than what you worked with before, which makes it easier to shape.

A couple of tips when shaping the mud, use a wood float to pack the mud, and keep the float oriented longways from the perimeter to the drain. If you turn it the other direction, the corners of the float will make little divots in the mud.
__________________
Kevin

The top ten reasons to procrastinate:

1.
Kman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Master Bathroom Renovation, Start To Finish Franko Tile Forum/Advice Board 117 08-20-2014 08:32 PM
FishDug's master bathroom renovation FishDug Tile Forum/Advice Board 28 04-16-2012 06:22 PM
TNT Master Bathroom Renovation Completed SonicAgamemnon Tile Forum/Advice Board 4 06-29-2011 09:38 PM
Master bathroom renovation with steam shower underway SonicAgamemnon Tile Forum/Advice Board 3 03-02-2011 07:34 PM
Ed's 1956 Ranch Master Bathroom Renovation Ed_S Tile Forum/Advice Board 21 11-13-2007 05:01 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:04 PM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018 John Bridge & Associates, LLC