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Old 05-08-2018, 01:03 PM   #16
jboyles
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Waterproofing the Shower

Well, I think I'm going to take CX's suggestion and go with the Durock Shower System instead of Schluter. Got some pricing for the full set up, including foam backerboard on the walls and it is much more affordable. The linear drain was especially a better deal. I'll be ordering it this week and putting up the walls after I get a plumber to move some things around a bit. More updates soon!
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Old 05-08-2018, 04:50 PM   #17
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We had the shower door company put a hinged piece of glass in this window. They used a piece of frosted glass on hinges like any other frame less door. Sorry I dont have picture of it installed. Opened for cleaning, closed for showering.

Why put a window in like that you ask? They architect designed the house with only the exterior view in mind and thats what kept things proportional. The whole bathroom was odd, the back of the vanity was seen from outside because there was a bank of windows the same height as the one in the shower that went the full length of the vanity.

The shower was done with Schluter systems, not ideal to be sure.
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Old 05-09-2018, 12:11 PM   #18
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Interesting solution, thanks! However, that won't really work in our situation. I'm going to do my best at waterproofing up to the window. I also think I might install a set of plastic shutters for privacy and that might also help reduce water contact at the window.
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Old 05-09-2018, 01:14 PM   #19
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Jon, I think the best option is to replace the window with a smaller one across the top like John said. But, like CX said, you can get the window waterproofed but make sure to slope the sill. I retiled a shower that was only a few years old that had a large window like that. They didn't maintain the silicone where the tiles met the window and when a small hole opened up, it allowed water to pour into the wall. Once the studs start to get wet, they swell and open the gap even more. We replaced studs nearly all the way around that shower. So keep an eye on the silicone.
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Old 05-09-2018, 01:26 PM   #20
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Thanks Davy. Definitely sloping the sill. I’ll also build in dates in my calendar to inspect and replace the silicone a few times a year as needed.


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Old 05-14-2018, 08:36 AM   #21
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New shower layout

Well, decided to flip the layout of the shower from the right to the left. This will have a couple benefits:

1. The window will not be in the direct line of fire from the shower heads. It will still get wet, but not nearly as much. I'll still be waterproofing it as much as possible.

2. Turns out, the old tub drain I was going to use is only 1 1/2" instead of 2", which is a no-no for a shower. Also, the drain line appeared to run under the wall so it would be really difficult to access.

This weekend, I rented a big demo hammer and got to work on the easier to access, 2" drain from the previous shower stall. The demo went pretty well and I was able to route a totally new drain assembly to the correct location. Photo attached! I was also able to get a few sheets of the USG Durock foam backer board up. It went pretty well.

Questions:

1. After back-filling the hole with the dirt I saved, what would be the best material to use to finish out the top level with the concrete? Deck mud?

2. I've read several times not to screw through the curbs for shower glass. What about the vertical sections of the tile? Is that ok? I'm planning on a single pane of glass as well as poly shutters in the window that will need to mount on the inside edges of the window frame.
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Old 05-14-2018, 10:22 AM   #22
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1. Regular concrete will work. Some people here will recommend to drill out some holes in the side of the existing slab and epoxy in some rebar to connect the old and new concrete. I typically don't do that, but I do paint some fairly loose thinset on the sides of the hole just before pouring the new concrete, to help tie the old and new together.

Also remember to leave whatever size hole durock requires around the drain riser. I know for the Kerdi drain I either use a 4" PVC coupling (which can be left in place) or a length of 4" PVC pipe (which has to be removed before the concrete sets).

2. Screws on the vertical plane are typically less of an issue. Just fill any holes full of silicone or similar before the screws. Also pre-planning the locations and having solid blocking is a help.
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Old 05-14-2018, 10:52 AM   #23
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Good information! I don’t think I’ll do any rebar. I’ve seen plenty of filled holes without that being done successfully online.

I plan on dry fitting the drain once I receive it to see how much space I’ll need around the drain. Good idea with the coupler.

Thanks!


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Old 05-31-2018, 10:27 AM   #24
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Plumbing complete. Slab needs work

I've finished the plumbing for the shower, including the new drain. All this over my paternity leave, had a baby a couple weeks ago!

My Durock Linear floor system is here and I've noticed that the slab is not quite as flat as I thought previously. There are a few high points that are a bit rough, but not very much. I'm about to purchase an angle grinder with a vacuum attachment to flatten out these areas. I should be able to get the shower floor put down after I flatten the concrete and fill in the hole from the drain area (picture attached).

Any advice on at what point to put the shower floor down? I figured I could even complete the tiling on the walls, less 6" or so from the floor and then do the shower floor itself.
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Old 05-31-2018, 10:30 AM   #25
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Also, it is possible to change this thread name to Jon's Master Bathroom Remodel?

Thanks!
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Old 05-31-2018, 04:03 PM   #26
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For a fixed glass panel without a hinged door attached you don't really need a floor bracket. Wall brackets will suffice, and the silicone will hold the glass to the floor just fine. If you want a floor bracket, you could do the stubbed-screw method with epoxy to avoid drilling through the curb.
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Old 06-01-2018, 08:38 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by makethatkerdistick View Post
For a fixed glass panel without a hinged door attached you don't really need a floor bracket. Wall brackets will suffice, and the silicone will hold the glass to the floor just fine. If you want a floor bracket, you could do the stubbed-screw method with epoxy to avoid drilling through the curb.


Great, thank you!


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Old 06-09-2018, 08:57 PM   #28
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I had a couple of rough, high points on the slab. Bought a decent, mid tier grinder over the weekend along with the dust attachment. It worked incredibly well. Actually, too well! I got a little carried away having fun with it. Now, the area with a few high points has a larger, but smooth low area in the slab. Oops. Iíve attached a picture showing how low it goes. I imagine itís about 1/8Ē or a bit more.
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Iím using the Durock foam shower tray and I know the floor needs to be very flat. What is my best route in this situation? Use a little extra mortar in that spot when I lay the floor down or use a self leveling product on the 40Ēx60Ē shower floor area?
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Old 06-09-2018, 09:21 PM   #29
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While you may be able to compensate for that floor flatness when you bed your foam tray in thinset mortar, Jon, I would still recommend you dispense with the foam and make your shower floor using deck mud. The deck mud doesn't care if your floor is flat or level and it will fit the shower footprint and drain location precisely while providing the proper slope.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 06-09-2018, 09:25 PM   #30
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While you may be able to compensate for that floor flatness when you bed your foam tray in thinset mortar, Jon, I would still recommend you dispense with the foam and make your shower floor using deck mud. The deck mud doesn't care if your floor is flat or level and it will fit the shower footprint and drain location precisely while providing the proper slope.



My opinion; worth price charged.


As it turns out, Iíve already got the foam floor and the linear drain kit paid for and delivered. Iím sure I would have been able to do the deck mud, especially with the linear drain and a single slope. I just decided to go the other route.

So you think thinset mortar will hide the dip with a typical application or should I go a little heavier in that one spot?


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