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Unread 02-22-2020, 08:15 AM   #91
makethatkerdistick
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Shawn, good information. Thanks! Still planning on PVC conduit because ..... hmm ... it doesn't cost much, and somewhere in my mind the idea exists that I could just pull in a new main service line should I ever have to. But if that would actually work so easily, I don't know.

Kman, just a regular GFCI. I am going to look at the inside of the boxes today to see if there are any wires that could touch. But they've been all rewired two years ago by myself. At the time I was convinced to have done everything by the book. It still wouldn't explain the spark the the tip of the chisel or the saw blade, would it?
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Unread 02-22-2020, 09:44 AM   #92
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Sounds a lot more like a static electric build-up than an actual electrical fault to me Wolfgang.
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Unread 02-23-2020, 08:43 PM   #93
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CX, let's hope you're right. I am still confounded by that phenomenon!

I've been running new supply lines to the master bath. They will ultimately connect inside the vanity with the existing lines that serve both sinks and the shower.

In the guest bath I decided to not tear out the wall where the current supply is located but to slightly relocate it. Just couldn't bring myself to demolish the drywall I had recently finished. With the relocated connection access was a breeze from the other side.

I don't have a photo but I've started to also replace the outside spigots as I go along. I am going with the standard Arrowhead frost proof hose bibs. They take a simple washer which is so easy to replace. In two locations I am installing 12 inch faucets which means the valve will be literally sitting inside interior space (where an interior wall perpendicularly meets an exterior wall). This will make them absolutely freeze proof.
To that end, I also had to bite the bullet and invest in a 1 1/4 in SDS Max bit to drill through the brick veneer. Works great, though!
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Unread 02-23-2020, 08:52 PM   #94
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If you don't start showing some burn marks on your framing, Wolfgang, ain't nobody gonna take you seriously on this re-plumbing.
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Unread 02-23-2020, 10:07 PM   #95
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There are some burn marks where I couldn't get the protective blanket tucked underneath. The fiber blanket now has a few holes burnt in it.
Speaking of fatigue: I am getting tired of this project, really tired. I feel like that burnt blanket.

On another note, I was finally able to dig two feet under the foundation and to connect my service entrance hole to the great outdoors, so to speak. Took me a day to dig up that dense clay soil underneath. I hated every second of it. As Dan would say: It was approximately zero fun.
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Unread 02-23-2020, 11:46 PM   #96
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C'mon, now, this is no time to be wishy-washy about the project. Was it zero fun or not zero fun. Approximations are for sissies.
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Unread 02-24-2020, 12:21 AM   #97
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Equipment, Equipment,Equipment, I hate shovel work. All that stuff around the house next to all those pesky utilities that requires it, HATE IT
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Unread 02-24-2020, 08:49 AM   #98
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Had to dig a quite large, semi circular hole about 6' deep for a basement egress window. Oldest son, then 14 or 15, with all his hole digging experience (none) challenged that it could be dug in an hour. Maybe two.

7+ hours later he was still having approximately zero fun. I gotta find the picture. LOL
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Unread 02-24-2020, 01:32 PM   #99
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You got a 15 year old city kid to work??!! Wow, never been able to do that.
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Unread 02-24-2020, 09:09 PM   #100
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My son can deem himself lucky that he's only five. No digging duty for him yet. And CX, approximations have so far defined my life. If that brings with it the title of a sissy, I will proudly wear it.

For the first time in its fifty years, this house will have a shut-off valve (and one that is accessible, too). So far, I have only been able to shut the water off at the meter. It has always been a pain since I had to go outside and dig in the meter box in the ground. Plus, it never shut the water off completely, and a little drip always remained.

I chose an American-made Apollo valve in hopes of long service life. It was a special online order as nobody in these climes stocks domestic valves. Below the Apollo is where my PEX line will enter the slab from underneath and connect to the barbed connector I sweated on.

The panel is made by Oatey. It was reasonably priced and is also paintable. Since access will be infrequent, the plastic panel will suffice (over the more expensive hinged metal panels). It's large enough to enable me to make repairs in the future without struggling. I hate, hate, hate lack of access!

The left 1/2 in pipe feeds one outside spigot (decided to add another valve here if I want to disable the spigot over the winter), the other pipe will feed the toilet in front of it.
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Unread 02-27-2020, 11:09 AM   #101
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Got some dark burn marks for CX to lighten his day!

I decided to get the 12 inch long-stem freeze-proof Arrowhead sillcock. I wrapped it in white vinyl tape to protect it from scratching the copper against the masonry when installing it. More importantly, the valve body is fully inside the house and should never give me any freezing trouble, provided the hose is disconnected. I preferred to sweat it in as opposed to making a threaded connection.

The lower branch in the picture goes around a 90 deg. interior/exterior wall corner which I achieved by diagonally drilling a 1 1/4 in hole through the two adjacent framing members and using a long-sweep elbow. With the existing access panel on the other side, I only had to cut a 4 x 10 in hole behind the toilet to be able to take my new supply to its location. As you can see, when the time for the switch-over comes, this will be fast without much downtime. Also, I lucked out by not having to temporarily remove the toilet.

Getting there....
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Unread 03-01-2020, 09:13 PM   #102
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Stressful weekend! I dug 40 feet of trench to a depth of 20 inches. I thought going a bit beyond code minimum might be prudent. Wow, what a painful undertaking it was! Cut through parts of a French drain and an old root somewhere in between. I also killed a buried 3/4 PVC sprinkler pipe which is no big deal as I decommissioned that system years ago. Got plenty of scratches from the prickly shrubs I didn't want to cut down to avoid drawing Mrs. Wolfgang's condemnation.

Next, I ran 2 in PVC conduit from the hole in the foundation to the meter. I only had to put two 45 deg. elbows in to facilitate the turn under the foundation. The rest was a straight shot. The PVC conduit fully comes through the slab and effectively protects the PEX line from start to finish and in particular as it moves through the slab.

Pushing through the PEX was a snap really. I am glad I put in the conduit if future replacement were to become necessary. Then I made my first real Uponor connection with the manual expanding tool. Still have to do the connection at the meter in the next couple of days to do the switch-over. I got all the parts. Until then, the old system is still online.

The photo shows the transition from 1 inch PEX A to 3/4 inch copper. That better not be a leaker.

Getting closer yet again!
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Unread 03-04-2020, 01:06 PM   #103
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I finally did make my connection at the meter. I was very nervous but everything worked out great. The PEX to copper has no leaks and everything works as intended. I still got to hook up two out of four exterior spigots and run a branch in the wall to one shower but this is predictable and doable.

My house is officially no longer at risk of developing a slab leak!

Repiping has been a painful path but I am very satisfied. (Now, don't mention all the drywall repair...).
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Unread 03-24-2020, 11:41 AM   #104
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I think I am losing faith in humanity.

As I am capping off all abandoned water lines I was also removing the copper line to the fridge a plumber had installed seven years ago. He had tapped into the cold laundry supply and had taken rigid copper pipe to an in-line filter and then to the fridge. The idea was good and the execution looked clean, although it took up quite some space alongside the laundry room wall.

The guy was an old dude with decades of experience in his trade. A reputable master plumber, not just some cheap dude from Craigslist. He charged me two arms and three legs.

I already knew he had used type M copper. Even though technically not against the code here, what self-respecting plumber does that for the sake of shaving off five bucks?
Now I also found out he had never deburred the pipe he ran. Not a single piece! He had also used drywall screws to attach the brackets that held the line in place. Again, which self-respecting professional would do that? Plus, judging from the corrosion inside the pipe, he had used a ton of flux. Way too much and totally unnecessary. Probably used the non-H2O soluble one that doesn't wash off as easily and keeps corroding the inside.

Honestly, I am done with a lot of the local trades people.
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Unread 03-24-2020, 12:36 PM   #105
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Much of the well water in my local area will corrode the inside of the copper pipe with no help at all from any acid-containing soldering flux, Wolfgang.

The Type M copper is unacceptable to me, but I've used course drywall screws when they were close at hand to install many a bracket to secure plumbing copper to the framing where necessary. And would make no apology for having done so. If the drywall screw would fail in that application, I submit that you had a more serious problem anyway.

But that's:

My opinion; worth price charged.
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