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Unread 02-06-2020, 10:09 PM   #61
cx
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OK, now I understand the situation (I think). And it would seem that you definitely have the option of re-locating your hole should your first selection include rebar. I see now where they recommend the bit for concrete and for concrete with rebar, but I'm not at all sure they mean for you to drill through the rebar nor if the bit is actually capable of that. For sure you could use your bit to attempt to drill through rebar, but you certainly cannot use mine for that purpose.

Speaking of which, if you'll promise not to attempt to drill through any rebar, I'll let you use my 1 3/4" bit for your one-time drilling. Shipping both ways should still result in a substantial cost savings.

This is an exterior wall you're dealing with? And not setting on a perimeter beam in your SOG?
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Unread 02-07-2020, 11:18 AM   #62
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CX, that offer of yours is awfully nice. I might pick you up on it. Thank you! And if I were to hit rebar, I'd replace your bit, of course.

Methinks that I should try another approach first, though. What do you think of the following?
I could buy a 3/4 in SDS Max bit (approx. $50 for the Bosch SpeedX with the thick carbide tip) to make four or five holes in proximity to each other. I can use holes in the 2x4 bottom plate as a guide to keep the concrete bit from wandering off. After completing the 3/4 in holes in the slab, I drill out a 2 1/4 in hole in the 2x4, then do the chiseling with my chisel tip.

That way, I would be left with a drill bit I might actually reuse in the future. 3/4 in seems to be useful for all sorts of heavy-duty anchoring purposes perhaps?

The hole in the slab will be in an interior wall, about 1 1/2 to 2 feet away from the outer edge of the slab. I assume this will keep me clear of the thicker concrete perimeter, won't it? I don't even know how thick and wide those were poured in the late 1960s.
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Unread 02-07-2020, 12:20 PM   #63
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Guessing at someone else's SOG foundation design is not an easy thing, Wolfgang. I figger you're likely to be wrong about 100 percent of the time.

I always try to put my interior grade beams at 10 to 12-foot intervals and under support walls whenever possible, but the variations are endless. 'Bout all a fella can do is drill where it's convenient above and hope for the best. Unless you can get some insight when you dig under the foundation. Have you done that part yet?

I find that in concrete bits for my rotary hammer I use 1/2" and 1" bits more often than a 3/4" bit, but that's pretty subjective. Always good to have more bits, though, if you plan to be using that drill more in future.

For an operation like you described with the 3/4" bit I always favor more holes and less chipping. That would be even more true if I were trying to protect an adjacent area.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 02-07-2020, 12:50 PM   #64
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https://youtu.be/6xk8aQ88_UY

Just use this technique and drill right through anything in that slab.

Use a good bit like DeWalt DW5474
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003R7LBU6..._5eBpEb0KFX5JP
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Unread 02-07-2020, 12:59 PM   #65
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DW 1-3/8" X 24" X 29" FOUR CUTTER SDS MAX ROTARY HAMMER BIT - DW5856

I can also get this bit for an awesome price of 73 bucks but it's only 80 some on Amazon
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Unread 02-07-2020, 03:46 PM   #66
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A good diamond saw will go right through rebar when used as the instructions call for, and, many of them will do it quite quickly as well.

In the Mohs hardness scale, diamond is 10 and iron is in the 5-6 range. The hassle comes in that it is easy to overheat the blade's structure, and the diamonds come off as their bond to the cutter's body isn't all that tenacious, and steel on steel isn't the greatest cutter as rebar is moderately hard in the scheme of things.

Some can be used dry, some require it to be wet and inside would make a major mess! If any of them are used dry, you really want to have dust containment operating, or you'll have dust throughout the home...diamond cutters tend to grind the hole, not cut it like a drill bit in metal or wood. That dust tends to be quite fine and it floats a LONG ways.
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Unread 02-07-2020, 05:17 PM   #67
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Bought the Bosch SpeedX 1/2 in bit at HD for $40. I figured if I am trying to make a bigger hole by dint of several small holes, I might as well choose a smaller size bit. The bit is advertised as being able to penetrate rebar but I am still hopeful to not hit rebar.

I'll report back after I've attempted this. So far, I haven't done any digging on the outside yet. Kind of cold and wet this week.

Looking forward to receiving the Uponor expansion fittings and the manual expander next week. Then it'll be time to rent the infamous Ditch Witch.
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Unread 02-07-2020, 07:20 PM   #68
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A half-inch bit is certainly more likely to go through some rebar than would be your two-inch bit, I'm sure, but I'll still be curious to know how well it works if you do hit some steel in there. I'll remain skeptical 'till I hear a report.
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Originally Posted by Wolfgang
I've been doing lots of pull-ups and push-ups in anticipation of the manual expansion process.
Seems like you could buy you a shovel to augment that exercise program by digging that little 40-foot ditch instead of rentin' no steenkin' DitchWitch.
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Unread 02-07-2020, 09:21 PM   #69
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I think this is a new generation of drill bits with an integrally welded solid carbide tip. Lots of brands carry these now. They all say "Made in Germany" on them, so I assume they might come from one manufacturer and get rebranded.
From what I've seen on youtube, they actually chew through rebars. Several test videos out there.

DeWalt, Diabolo, Bosch and Hilti have them (and probably many more). Wouldn't be surprised if Bosch invented them (like they did with SDS) but I am not sure. Here's a Hilti commercial:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85THvfChSNU
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Unread 02-08-2020, 01:46 AM   #70
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If you were closer I would swing by
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Unread 02-08-2020, 09:01 PM   #71
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Shawn, I too wished you could just come by with that trencher of yours!

I created my opening in the slab today. It went really well. I scored the 2x4 with a 2 in hole saw. Then I drilled nine 1/2 in holes along the perimeter, using the scored line as a starting point for each hole. I then used those holes in the wood as a guide for my Boschhammer. The SpeedX drill bit is amazing. It took me literally 10 seconds per hole to pierce through the slab. Once I had drilled all nine holes in the slab, I used the hole saw to complete my 2 in hole in the 2x4. After that, I gently chiseled out the portion of the slab below with the Boschhammer. I am now left with a nice service hole.

No rebar in the process but there is one piece of metal from the wire mesh that became visible after I cleaned out the debris. The drill must not have hit it, though. It's also not in the way for when I will feed in my PEX tubing.

Well, next weekend I'll have to do some digging from the outside!
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Unread 02-08-2020, 09:35 PM   #72
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Good job! But we still don't know how well that bit would have done through re-bar, do we?
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Unread 02-09-2020, 12:59 PM   #73
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I need more perspective on that picture Wolfgang. It looks like a gloved hand reaching through a hole in drywall grabbing onto a decorative globe lighting fixture between some joists. I know that’s not what it is, but what are we looking at in relation to the drilled slab?
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Unread 02-09-2020, 02:50 PM   #74
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You're looking at a wood framed wall sole plate from the top, Jeff. The thick white line at the bottom of the photo is the cut gypsum board wall. The ring of holes through the wood plate lead to the concrete foundation slab below, through which he has drilled a ring of holes and then knocked out the center.

In a later photo perhaps he'll show you his PEX 1" tubing coming up through said hole.
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Unread 02-09-2020, 04:36 PM   #75
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Jeff, you nailed it. It's in fact a decorative globe lighting fixture. How did you know? Not sure what CX is talking about...
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