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Unread 02-09-2019, 10:10 PM   #16
laostirch
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Justin, thank you for your input. I texted him letting him know my concern and he replied he’s not done leveling and will put a waterproof membrane,think he was bit annoyed ( we talked about redguard or Mapei prior to install deck mud, either method was going to be used on top of cement board. I’m leaning towards do over, I saw couple of you tube videos and the consistency is definitely not I saw on YouTube.

One of video mentioned if it’s too watery then I’ll have some mold issue down the road so unless I’m getting different suggestions on experts here, then I guess it will be do over.

My understanding on procedure would be,
1. Strip existing deck mud and sublfloor
2. Install new subflooor
3. 30 roof felt paper/metal lath
4. Apply deck mud as Mr. Bridges’s instruction
5. Let it dry
6.do I need a another layer of roof felt paper?
7. Do I still need a waterproof membrane? It’s a powder room but another powder room is big enough to wash face etc.
8.thinset and tile
9. Grout

I’m sorry if there is another thread on step by step, I’m bit panicking and worry how I’m going to tell my contractor about this so if anyone can answer or post a link if there’s any step by step, I’ll be really appreciated. Time is essence since my contractor will be here tomorrow morning. Thanks in advance
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Unread 02-09-2019, 10:40 PM   #17
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I wouldn't worry about mold unless this floor was made for some type of shower floor, and if it is we have a WHOLE host of other problems.

The do over part isn't necessary if it's in a sound condition. He can bring it into a flat plane and paint it with the membrane when that patch is fully dry. I just find it odd that the part that fixes it... needs to be fixed. I'm not saying I always hit bullseye on prep, but from the pictures you've shown and what you've said it does raise a quality alert.

If its determined to re-do I don't think a new subfloor will be necessary unless the mud was bonded directly to it with no roofing felt under the wire. Even then it might release fairly well though. Kind of a call made when you see it.

Step 6. No
Step 7. I like a membrane over deck mud, not for waterproofing (unless needed) but for crack isolation and to seal the top in a way. Redguard and Aqua defense both water proof and crack isolate.

all other steps look right, steps 1 and 2 are "to be determined" but I doubt it.
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Unread 02-09-2019, 10:40 PM   #18
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A properly done mud bed is porous which is important in a shower so that it can drain (thus the mold comment if it can't). That shouldn't be an issue outside of a wet area, though. Excessive moisture in the mix can lead to shrinkage. IF that's not happening, it might be salvaged, but should see some flattening done before you try to tile on it. Thinset is not designed to be applied as thick as that unevenness is going to require, and it makes tiling much harder adn time consuming, so prep is the key.

But, it sort of doesn't make sense to use deck mud to prep the surface, and then go do something else to flatten it. The objective is to do it all in one step, if you know what you're doing.

Too much moisture and it's difficult to pack properly.
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Unread 02-09-2019, 10:57 PM   #19
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What the others said. A dry pack mud bed has to be pulled with straight edges to get the mud flat. It looks like he mixed up some soupy mud and pushed it around with a trowel. It's nearly impossible to get the floor flat doing it like that.
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Unread 02-09-2019, 11:15 PM   #20
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Damn nice pack Davy.
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Unread 02-10-2019, 12:37 AM   #21
laostirch
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Thank you everyone, I’m feeling overwhelming support here, thank you. I’ll have a candid talk with my contractor tomorrow and I might show this thread. At least the other powder room, we’ll do it right for sure.

Davy, I had to stare for few second because what you have there is work of art!

I’ll definitively report back tomorrow, thank you again gentlemen.
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Unread 02-10-2019, 02:07 PM   #22
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Mud screeds are usually run around the perimeter and then the middle filled in. I have edges from 18 inches to 12 ft so that 4 ft edge wasn't used on the whole floor. That was what I used to do the last part as I backed out the door.

Here's another pic of a patio that had pitch. They turned this area into an indoor sunroom and wanted it level. Best I remember the mud was about 1 inch at the house and 3 or so inches along the outside edge. I came back a day or two later and skim coated the whole floor with thinset so other workers could work on it without tearing it up. I then tiled it after the other workers were finished.
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Unread 02-10-2019, 06:21 PM   #23
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Hi guys,

So my contractor just left, he put self leveling on tiny powder room now the floor is even, he also worked on the other powder room with deck mud method, it is deifinirley consistency I was looking for but the original floor being so uneven, he’s going to put self leveling again on top of it, maybe we could’ve touch posts underneath but it was beyond my budget, I’m going to hope that what we are going to to is good enough for few years until I’ll have enough budget to really tackle beyond surface. It is not what I would like but the powder rooms were so dire situation, dirty, messy and not usuable, I’m going to comprise for now. Eventually I’d like to expand one of larger powder room to full bath in next few years so I’ll be content to these rooms to be usauble at the moment.

Thank you again for all your advises, this forum really has been life saver, I’ll come back to post some updated pics once all is done, after that, my main bathroom, the floor is pretty even, except the local area that is about 3/4” sunken, ahhh joy of living in old house( although I’ve been few old house that was well taken care of, so I don’t think it’s old house issue probably more like the house that wasn’t loved in the past like mine). Anyways, thanks again all of you!!
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Unread 02-10-2019, 09:27 PM   #24
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I don't use a lot of SLC but some recommends a primer be put down first, did he check to see if it was needed?
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Unread 02-10-2019, 10:38 PM   #25
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Almost all SLCs require a primer. There are a few exceptions, but without one, you can have problems if it is called for by the manufacturer.
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Unread 02-11-2019, 10:26 PM   #26
laostirch
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Hi, feeling bit defeated now, this old house, more you opened up, more surprises! Not in a good way at all. I’m not sure if he used the primer, i need to check in with him tomorrow and eve though I repeatedly asked him to leave a gap between floor to wall, ( for contraction and expansion) i came home saw he filled up the space where baseboards were and floor with some kind of cement, he is licensed, so I trust him but sometimes one is so used to do his own way that he refuse to get a new idea?? I don’t know.. and definitely no language barrier as he is as American as one can be..

I asked the question before but don’t believe that I got any, subfloor plywood, deck mud, self leveling and tile, All needs to have about 1/4” space, right? Could someone can please let me know?

So far the first bathroom has still has self leveling since I asked him to take the baseboards on this one and the other powder room, I’m starting to regret hiring this contractor.
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Unread 02-11-2019, 10:27 PM   #27
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Here some pics
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Unread 02-11-2019, 10:40 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Renee
...so I trust him but sometimes one is so used to do his own way that he refuse to get a new idea??
Renee, there is nothing at all new about the use of mortar beds as a tiling substrate. Indeed, it's one of the oldest methods still in use and there is no excuse for someone who claims to be experienced to do one incorrectly as he did yours. And absolutely should never need a self-leveling compound to make the surface flat.

Yes, there should be a movement accommodation joint between the mud bed and your walls. For small rooms like you have, you probably don't really need the full quarter-inch, but the mud should not be hardbound against the walls.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renee
I’m starting to regret hiring this contractor.
Unfortunately, I think that might be a well founded regret.
My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 02-11-2019, 11:04 PM   #29
laostirch
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I just happened to check the other powder room and this is self leveling he used on the other powder room, I’m 90% sure that he didn’t use the primer because I walked around on Sunday when the contractor pour the self leveling on first room.

Here some pics of second room that he worked on to use deck mud, granted the house had an addition in 30? 40? Really old, has almost 2ft bump, joists were overlapped only half of added joist so as time went by, looks like joists were bent that created huge bump on the floor, so highest point to adjacent floor has more than 1” differences,

I’m starting to doubt his ability and not sure what to do, I can have him prime the deck mud bathroom( 2nd powder room) then put self leveling, have him take out the first one out( because I suspect he didn’t use roofing felt between plywood subfloor to “watery” deck mud because I picked the roofing felt myself to use it on second powder room. total budget is -I’m going to omit,let just say they were par with other bids ( tile, toilet and sink are my cost) the bids were all within similar range, so I chose him because he had the most long standing license history and I just liked his demure. I’m trying to figure out go I’m going fix this mess..
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Unread 02-11-2019, 11:06 PM   #30
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Here is SLC, it does require primer
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