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Unread 11-26-2018, 11:24 AM   #1
z56o2
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Bullnose blade recommendations for porcelain?

Hello, I'm looking for a bullnose blade for my 7" wet saw to use on porcelain tile. Any brand recommendations? Home depot sells one made by archer for $46 but I'm worried it might be a cheapo and not last since most other one's I've found are $100 and up. Any experience with DRP blades?


My apologies, I seem to have posted this in the wrong place. Please disregard. I don't see a delete option.
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Unread 11-26-2018, 07:08 PM   #2
Davy
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Here's one that goes on a grinder. Crayon Jack posted this pic several years ago. 230 bucks back then but it works real well.
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Unread 11-26-2018, 07:27 PM   #3
Tool Guy - Kg
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Welcome to the forum, Eric.

Is this the Archer bullnose profiler you’re referring to? There’s an anti-spam measure in place that’ll prevent you posting a link until you get at least 3 posts under your belt. If you wanna post a link, just leave a space between the www and the dot and any moderator that sees it will light it up.

I assume “DRP” is a brand name?

As far as the profiling wheel, most of what you’ve probably seen available so far is electroplated (rather than sintered) profile wheels. The electroplated versions are easier and cheaper to make than sintered...but are a lot less durable. I don’t think one electroplated profile wheel is going to be significantly better than another electroplated. Although the more pricey might.....might be better balanced. If I only had a few jobs to do, I wouldn’t hesitate to buy a cheap electroplated version (read bottom paragraph for what I’d actually buy), but I’d spin it on my saw to check for excessive vibration before using it. Just make sure to keep a healthy stream of water on the cutting edge to keep it clean and cool (heat is the #1 factor to ruin a cheap blade like this).

As a comparison, you could spend >$200 for a sintered version of this wheel and you’d have a truly heavy duty tool....but that’s hard to justify for just a job or two.

Okay, that all being said, I gotta ask what you’re going to do to finish off the bullnose with once you’ve profiled them. The tile is far too rough (scratchy/streaky) to use right off the profiling wheel. You need a wet or dry grinding set-up with polishing pads or silicone carbide sanding discs to smooth out the edge. And because a lot of pros have wet grinders to do this, I personally think a different profiling tool is better. Rather than use a wheel that spins on your wet-saw, use a wet router bit on your wet grinder. Besides the profiler doing a superior job of referencing the start of the cut off the face of the tile (the profile wheel on your tile saw references the cut from the bottom of the tile...which sometimes changes its thickness enough to cause headaches....so wheels on saws have to be mounted at the PERFECT height...and even that slips a bit), you don’t need to break down your saw to do the bullnose. And I like wet grinding with the pads after profiling them, as they generally do a better job than dry polishing...and the pads last longer. These wet router bits also come in electroplated (roughly $100) and sintered (roughly $200). The electroplated versions are fine for several jobs. The fact that they are fed water right to the face of the cutting face helps keep them cool.



EDIT: Ha...I started typing before Davy replied. But, as usual, I blathered on and on and.....
Sorry about that.
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Unread 11-27-2018, 01:47 PM   #4
zeaflal
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Here is an option for an occasional use polisher. (I think there are other brands.) It includes most everything you need to put a polished bullnose on porcelain. Odds are you can finish one job before the bit wears out. You might want to pick up a 10000 grit pad from eBay.

It is tedious, messy, and time consuming to use. Obviously not intended for routine professional work. It does take a little practice and attention to get consistency good results.
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