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Unread 01-22-2005, 03:52 PM   #1
bradesp
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Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Question Bathroom Demo Not Yet Started - Seeking Sub-Floor Advice First!

OK, I plan to gut and completely remodel a 15 year old master bath that has an existing 5/8" subfloor Plywood + 1/2" Durock Backer + standard 6" ceramic tiles on the floor. In the shower it's sheet rock over studs + 1/2" Durock + Tile..

I would like to tear out the tile completely and then use an electric radiant heat below the new tiles (for the floor area). Since I can demo down to the joists if I choose, or leave the 5/8" sub-floor, how would you advise that I proceed if I want to achieve the following:

1. I plan to put down a wire based radiant floor product (masterheat) covered by SLC at no more than 1/4" thinkness to cover the wires.

2. My current total floor thickness is the 5/8" subfloor + 1/2" backer + Scratch coat + Tile thickness. I don't want to be significantly over this thickness.. I can probably live with another 1/2" total thickness with no trouble, but more than that will create issues with transitioning to the adjacent non-tile areas in the bedroom.

My questions are:

Should I try saving the existing 5/8" subflor and then pour the 1/4" slc on top of the radiant wires and then put down 1/2" backer then scratch coat + the tile or ...

Should I tear out floor down to joists and then glue/screw 3/4 T&G Plywood then put down the radiant wire / SLC then the Tile? Or should I always plan to put Durock over the subfloor before the tile?

Sorry for asking such basic questions, just want to hear pros/cons of different approaches to re-placing my existing tile floor.

Thanks!

brad



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Unread 01-22-2005, 04:09 PM   #2
doitright
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Hi Brad

Have you performed a search on the forum?

Another option is to add 1/2" (3/8" min.) plywood to your 5/8" subfloor (BTW, what is it plywood, OSB?). Then your heating cables (you said wires not mats, correct?). Diamond mesh lathe over that. Primer, SLC, and tile.
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Unread 01-22-2005, 04:29 PM   #3
LonnythePlumber
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I recommend you spend all your money on plumbing.
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Unread 01-22-2005, 07:57 PM   #4
bradesp
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John,

Definately 5/8" plywood, NOT osb (I built the house originally) and yes, radiant wires, not mats.

I browsed the forums, but didn't conduct a search for keywords. I'll give that a try.

Hey Lonny, LOL.

brad
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Unread 01-23-2005, 02:17 PM   #5
John Bridge
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Hi Brad, Welcome aboard.
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