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Unread 05-04-2013, 08:22 PM   #1
tilelayer
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grinding concrete

So been doing larger jobs lately over slabs. Many of the slabs around here are very old and have low and high spots that are unreal being that the homes are so freaking old over here. I would like to get into grinding but I do not know much or anything about it. Or should there be another approach? Can a machine be purchased that will grind the whole floor and take off the high spots as well?? Anyone care to enlighten me I am all ears. I know EDCO makes some very good machines for this purpose I have been looking at them but I am unsure of which one I would need. I even emailed their technical support but they did not answer me.
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Unread 05-04-2013, 09:36 PM   #2
giarc25
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The Edco TG-10 is a really nice machine and when paired with a 300 CFM vacuum it does a really nice job of dust control too. It makes quick work of thinset take-up and does in fact take down the high spots in the slab. I have no first hand experience, as I do not own one, but have done tons of research in this matter and plan on buying one when my finances line up to allow it.
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Unread 05-05-2013, 11:04 AM   #3
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Edco has been around for EVER and has a good reputation. I've ground a lot of concrete and what I will tell you about the EDCO machines is that they are to light to tackle the kind of job you're talking about. Grinding concrete comes down to power, weight and the diamond tooling. If you want the best bang for the buck, specialty diamond auctions off one X1 dual 20" rotary grinder a week on eBay, no reserve, highest price wins. They go anywhere from 1500 to 4000. The X1 is a 400 plus pound machine the is driven by a 5 horse computer controlled motor. It's far superior to EDCOs machine for this application. Full disclosure: they are my machines and specialty diamond is my store but it doesn't change the fact that the above is a true statement.
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Unread 05-05-2013, 12:36 PM   #4
Brad Denny
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We often rent an Edco dual disc floor grinder from a local rental company. I have only used the strip-serts, a carbide tooth, for the removal of thinset and carpet glue. To date, it is the best thing going for our purposes.

I too am looking around for different options. One thing to keep in mind, most "plate" floor grinders have "floating" heads, which means there is a some play in the head to tilt to the contour of the floor. I wouldn't rely much on them for grinding down low spots.

The TG series mentioned uses a large diamond "cup" grinding head, and it doesn't float like the dual heads. We have used it several times, but have found that it would have been easier to use a large hand held grinder and apply greater pressure where needed.

Unless you plan to use water for removing old glue, high speed seems to be the way to go, to keep the grinding surface hot enough to clean itself of the glue and not get gummed up. I viewed a WerkMaster machine at Braxton Bragg's both at Coverings. It is an interesting machine, but terribly expensive. Somewhere in the $5-7k range. A planetary grinder would work much the same way, speeding up the rpms to achieve more results faster. I also looked at a Samich machine and have looked at Lavina online. They look like really nice machines as well, but again, expensive. These higher rpm grinders are intended to be used for the restoration and polishing of concrete, terrazzo , and stone. Though I'd love to do those things in the future, right now I'd rather have the brute prepping ability and flexibility of something like the Edco for a fraction of the cost.

Husqvarna had an interesting machine, the PG series somewhat similar to the Edco TG but much more elaborate with different plate options for many applications. I didn't get a projected cost.

I think Pearl also has a few toys, and I'm sure there are countless others out there. When looking, note whether or not the machines are 110 or 220, as we have an old 220 machine and getting the power can be aggravating sometimes.
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Unread 05-05-2013, 11:11 PM   #5
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Husqvarna PG 280 + Dewalt dust extractor, been using this setup for over a year and swear by it. Grind high spots , thin set etc. No dust at all. $3.3K give or take for setup. wouldn't even touch a plank job 36 inch plus without it.
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Unread 05-06-2013, 05:06 AM   #6
Brad Denny
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Or, you could go big and get one of these...Schibeci

Fits right on to your excavator.
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Unread 05-06-2013, 03:07 PM   #7
tilelayer
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Patrick next time I'm in Pompano i will hit you up and see how you do this.
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Last edited by tilelayer; 05-06-2013 at 03:13 PM.
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Unread 05-06-2013, 04:56 PM   #8
Brad Denny
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Though I was partially kidding in my last post, scabbling is probably the most efficient way to lower the height of concrete. You could achieve this with something as simple as a bushing bit or as elaborate as this...Edco 3 Head Scabbler.

I wouldn't think it would be hard to get an air compressor that could achieved the required supply. 3/16" in one pass is a lot of concrete.

After scabbling, you could use a grinder to smooth the areas or use some type of skim patch.
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Last edited by Brad Denny; 05-06-2013 at 09:26 PM.
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Unread 05-06-2013, 05:02 PM   #9
Brad Denny
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Oops, just found an Edco Price List.
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Unread 05-06-2013, 07:36 PM   #10
tilelayer
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Brad,

I saw that scabbler I do not see how that device is good for our trade, I think the EDCO turbo grinder is better suited.
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Unread 05-06-2013, 09:38 PM   #11
Brad Denny
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Maybe so, I've only used a 7" TG style grinder, but if you trying to lower the height of concrete, (which would work well for humps in the middle of the floor, in a hopeful curbless shower area, at a difficult transition, for removing tile, etc.)...

The TG-10 is four times faster than conventional grinders.

10" Working width will grind approximately 400-500 sq. ft. per hour at 1/16" with an EDCO Diamond Disc
RIGID HEAD ASSEMBLY IS IDEAL FOR:

Grinding uneven expansion joints, high spots, joint curls and bridge decks
Removing coatings
Grinding rough concrete surfaces

FLEX HEAD ASSEMBLY IS IDEAL FOR:

Preparing a smooth, flat floor to receive a new coating
Removing coatings
Grinding rough concrete surfaces
Grinding surfaces 4 times faster than a traditional floor grinder


OR


3 Head Scabbler

Removes up to 200 sq.ft. per hour at Depth Per Pass of 3/16"
Ideal for:

Removing spalled or deteriorated concrete
Roughening surfaces for new overlayments
Reducing high spots o rleveling uneven joints
Creating wheelchair access ramps
Sidewalk trip hazard repair
Removing epoxy
Creating slip-resistant surfaces
Texturing parking garage ramps
Breaking up ceramic tile
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Unread 05-06-2013, 09:46 PM   #12
Brad Denny
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Of course we are talking about a huge price difference too, the scabbler being almost $2k more, not including the air compressor. (TG-10 5HP-1P-230V=$4,562 vs. CD-3 CHIP DEK 3 HEAD w/ 3 5pt Bits=$6,170)

The bad thing about the Edco TG, you don't have much else you can do with it aside from grind, where as the Husqvarna PG at least has the really nice interchangeable accessories . The scabbler could do some mean demo too though.

Tough call, let us know what you go with. Anytime you drop $3k+ you certainly want it to be useful.
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Last edited by Brad Denny; 05-06-2013 at 10:23 PM.
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Unread 05-07-2013, 03:27 PM   #13
tilelayer
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haha I am just kicking tires right now....
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Unread 05-09-2013, 04:00 PM   #14
Bill Vincent
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I'm with Brad. All I've ever used was a 7" grinder. But I also usually use it for resurfacing concrete. If I've got to take down a hump, I've got a Bosch 11316EVS demo hammer with a bushing head that makes short work of anything concrete might throw at me.

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Unread 05-11-2013, 04:35 PM   #15
Davestone
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I agree.
I take a straight edge and mark high spots with an X,and low spots with a O.Then i grind the worst of the humps,and flash in the lows,and go for it.
You can also rent almost anything at our HD here,so maybe you can find something to just rent for now.
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