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Unread 07-31-2012, 10:20 AM   #1
Eggie
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Fiberglass insulation on interior wall

I am remodeling my bathroom and installing a "Kerdi" shower. One of the shower walls adjoins my living room wall. The wall has paper-backed fiberglass insulation installed between the wall studs. The paper side of the insulation lies against the living room drywall. My question is: Does the paper on the insulation act as a vapor barrier? What purpose does it serve other than maybe a noise abatement. Can I, or should I eliminate it?
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Unread 08-03-2012, 02:45 PM   #2
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Waterproofing shower valve

I purchased John Bridges book "Tile Your World" and found it very informative, so I'm ready to start my shower project. I plan to construct my tiled shower using the "Schluter Kerdi" products and proceedures. When I purchased my Kerdi Drain, a Kerdi Shower Valve Seal was included with the Drain kit. Unfortunately, my Moen Shower Valve has three knobs: hot, cold, & a diverter valve. The Kerdi Seal will not work with this valve. However, The book did not have much info on waterproofing the shower valve, other than the mention of the Kerdi Valve Seal. I know Schluter makes a sealent calking and so do many others. Can I use a sealent and be confident that it will not leak? All of the info I have read about the Kerdi Waterproofing Membrane had me almost convinced to use drywall instead of "HardiBacker". But what happens if water leaks past the shower valve? It seems to me that the "HardiBacker" would not self-destruct the way a gypsum-based drywall would - so I could FIX the leak and maybe not have to replace the whole wall - or worse. So with that in mind, is the "HardiBacker" a better choice.

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Unread 08-03-2012, 02:54 PM   #3
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I don't care much for Hardi on walls. The thickness of it is a little less than 1/2" which means it doesn't join up to regular sheetrock very well. When installing Kerdi on it, it's even tougher since it is so dry. It draws the moisture out of thinset very quickly, which can compromise the bond. For those reasons, I don't use Hardi on walls.

Before Schluter came out with the valve seals, I would use 100% silicone and smear it around the protrusions in the wall where the bare gypsum was showing. That was really just to make me fell better about it, since I didn't really think moisture was going to get to that point anyway. When I replaced my own shower valve a few months ago, I check the bare sheetrock around the valve and found that it was bone dry.

Typically, the valve trim pieces have a gasket that prevents excess water from entering the area where the valve protrudes through.
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Unread 08-03-2012, 02:55 PM   #4
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Welcome, Bill. If you would rather be called Eggie, you can change your signature line to reflect that.

It'll help if you'll keep all your project questions on one thread so folks can see what you're working on and what's been previously asked and answered. We can give it a more generic title any time you'd like to suggest one.

When building a Kerdi System shower per the manufacturer's instructions, you would coat the raw gypsum board edges at those penetrations with Kerdi Fix or silicone or a similar product to protect it. But if you've done everything else correctly, there will be no water in that area. The Kerdi Fix works wonderfully well in that application and I highly recommend a tube be purchased with every shower package.

You can, of course, use CBU for your backing material if you like.

I have never found a use for one of the valve body seals that now come with the shower kits. If yours doesn't fit your valves, toss it or give it to a friend.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 12-20-2012, 06:17 PM   #5
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thinsets

What type of thinset, modified or unmodified, to attach "Kerdi" to "PermaBase" cement board? Eggie
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Unread 12-20-2012, 06:33 PM   #6
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Always unmodified when using kerdi. This applies to all substrates. Now theres a lot of talk here about Versabond, which is slightly modified, and works fine, but it will void any Schluter warranties.
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Unread 01-10-2013, 06:20 PM   #7
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deck mud under Kerdi Drain

I am ready to start building my deck mud bed. I will be using a Kerdi Drain and I plan to have 1-1/4" thick bed of mud under the drain. I have 2 questions concerning installation of the Drain:
Question 1: Should I use a "Wetter" deck mud under the Kerdi Drain? My reasoning is that normal deck mud is so dry that it might be difficult to get a good "pack" under and around the Drain - also a "Wetter" mud would probably ooze up through the holes on the perimeter of the Kerdi Drain and help lock it in place (a good thing - maybe?). Would a "wetter" mud compromise strength? (I'm not talkin' soupy wet just wet enough). Would it be wise to pre-pack the deck mud - then apply about a 1/4" to 1/2" coating of unmodified thinset on top of the deck mud and set the Kerdi Drain in the thinset?
Question 2: Can I install the Kerdi Drain - then wait for the mud to dry (overnight) before proceeding with installing the remainder of the mud base floor? This method would prevent me from knocking the Drain out of level if it gets bumped. My concern with this method is will the mud base floor "Knit" to the (already dry) mud around the Kerdi Drain?
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Unread 01-14-2013, 03:54 PM   #8
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deck mud under kerdi drain

I posted a couple of questions for the tile forum but haven't got a response. Did I do something wrong (or maybe my questions were not understood). Please help.
Thank you
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Unread 01-14-2013, 06:23 PM   #9
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You've done nothing wrong at all, Eggie, we just sometimes get a little short handed, 'specially on weekends, and some questions are overlooked. But we try.

1. Yes, a bit wetter mixture under the Kerdi drain is good. Emphasis on "a bit." I find it helpful to richen up the mixture there by tossing a handful of Portland or masonry cement or thinset mortar into a gallon can of mud. Makes it moosh a bit easier.

2. No, I would not recommend you do that. You really want that shower floor to be monolithic. I think you'll find that once you've packed mud under your Kerdi drain it's quite solid enough to act as a guide for screeding the rest of the floor mud.

My opinio; worth price charged.
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Unread 01-28-2013, 01:45 PM   #10
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Installing a Wall/Ceiling Border Tile

I would like to install a ceramic border (i.q. molding) around the perimeter of my bathroom wall - at the very top of the wall, where it intersects the ceiling. The tile is a 2" Wide x 8" Long white glazed ceramic. The wall has "Permabase" CBU and the ceiling is drywall (gypsum). I plan to tile all the walls, top to bottom with white 3" x 6" ceramic subway tiles (except for the border at the top). My question is:
Should I install the border tiles first? If so, how do I hold them in place while the thinset dries? I was thinking a temporary horizontal ledge would work but I'm afraid thinset would get under the ledge, making it difficult to remove. How about a small finishing nail (4d) under each end of each tile - they would be easy to pull-out after the thinset dries. Thank you;
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Unread 01-28-2013, 01:58 PM   #11
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Eggie,

A ledger is the easiest and level-est. To prevent sticking, use blue painters tape on the ledger as a protective coating. It will be easier to apply the thinset to the back of the tiles and not the walls as the trowel size will make troweling the wall a first class PITA.

One problem you'll find - the ceiling isn't perfectly level. To hide this, set the tiles up to the ceiling, leaving the same 1/8" gap (maybe 1/16" if you can pull that off) for caulking. The ledger will ride up and down as the ceiling rides up and down.

When tiling the field tiles of the wall, the upper most row of tiles will get trimmed to accomodate the irregularities of the ceiling.
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Unread 05-07-2013, 07:57 PM   #12
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Low spots in my shower floor Mud Base

I just finished installing the mud base for my "Schluter Kerdi" shower floor. The floor is 38" x 60" with a "Kerdi Drain" in the center. I sloped the mud base 1/4" per foot as measured from the furthest corner to the drain. It looks pretty good, but I found two low spots. They have about a 1/16" depression at the deepest point and measure about 12" diameter. I also have a few high spots as well. I would like to correct the problem before I apply the "Kerdi" membrane. I have two questions:
Can I use some thinset mortar to fill-in the low spots?
Is there some kind of abrasive block that I can use to rub-down the high spots?

Thanks, Eggie
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Unread 05-07-2013, 09:09 PM   #13
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Yes, and yes.

You can fill small depressions with thinset, and in the masonry section of any big box store, there is a brick onna handle. Works great for knocking down high spots.
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