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Old 01-11-2019, 06:43 AM   #16
SpaceCadet
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Question: is it possible to just add channels to the drains from around the room instead of sloping the entire floor? Might not drain quite as thoroughly but it's easier to set up and you get the flat floor to set your appliances on.
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Old 01-11-2019, 08:54 AM   #17
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Davy:
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The mud will need to be nice and uniform, those 2 inch tiles won't bridge over any valleys. But dry pack is pretty easy to shape and form. When you get the mud shaped like you want, reach over and slick it down with a flat steel trowel as you back your way out.
That will be the challenge for me as I've never done this type of screeding before. Doing an initial layer around the perimeter will help a lot. These tile are actually quite rigid which might help, they are held together with what looks like small globs of glue which makes the sheets quite strong.

I'm just going to take my time doing the dry pack, maybe do the entire perimeter first, then a quarter to half the room, let it dry overnight and finish off the rest.

My understanding of the order as it stands:

1 Completely clean the cement slab
2 Sponge down the slab
3 Apply a scratch coat of thinset (does it matter whether the thinset is wet or dry before doing the dry pack?)
4 Slope the dry pack
5 Apply the Laticrete around the perimeter (not sure whether I need to apply a scratchcoat of thinset on top of the dry pack to accept the Laticrete?)
6 Lay the tiles
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Old 01-11-2019, 08:59 AM   #18
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Hi Paul,

Quote:
Question: is it possible to just add channels to the drains from around the room instead of sloping the entire floor? Might not drain quite as thoroughly but it's easier to set up and you get the flat floor to set your appliances on.
I thought about a drain across the doorway but in the end decided on sloping the floors because I wasn't comfortable jackhammering all that concrete from the slab, it has to go quite deep. Then I'd have to jackhammer a channel from the drain to the pipe at the center of the room. All a little out of my comfort zone.
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Old 01-11-2019, 12:45 PM   #19
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The thinset needs to be wet when you drop the dry pack on it. That way it will stick to the slab and also to the new mud. It will be a challenge, having to pull mud in a circle makes it tough. You will need several different length straight edges. Tape off the grate and screw it down to the height the mud needs to be and screed off the top of the drain.

Let the mud dry out well before you apply the Hydroban, It'll stick right to the mud.
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Old 01-16-2019, 09:45 AM   #20
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I've been reading 'thinset slurry' for bonding the dry pack to the concrete slab. The standard ratio of Versbond to water is 50lb thinset to 5.68 liters of water. I take it that a slurry just means more water. Does anyone have a volume ratio for the slurry (I don't have scales), for instance is 5 or 6:1 okay.
I've watch a few video's and the thinset viscosity for this application seems quite low.

Thanks.
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Old 01-16-2019, 10:23 AM   #21
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I never mix a full bag of thinset, because I'm slow. Typically, the ratio I use is 1 part water to 3 parts (+\-) powder. That will give me a good starting point depending on what type I'm using (versabond, megalite etc...). For a slurry, I would think 1 water to 2 or 2.5 powder might be a good starting point.
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Old 01-16-2019, 03:09 PM   #22
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Thanks Dan. That worked well.
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Old 01-18-2019, 03:49 PM   #23
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For the dry pack I used 1 part Portland cement and 5 parts sand. When researching the mortar for this project I came across the following note somewhere:

"(Note for tiling: Tiling should begin within approximately 16 hours of the mortar bed installation. After 24 hours, the mortar bed enters a green state and should not have tile adhered to it for 28 days.)"

Is this instruction specific to Sakcrete or does it apply to all dry pack mixes. Since I used Portland cement and sand should I have tiled within 24 hours?


Also should I be spraying down the dry pack to keep it from drying too fast?

Thanks.
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Old 01-18-2019, 06:21 PM   #24
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Not at all sure why they'd say that, Wayne. If you find out, please do let us know.

The ceramic tile industry considers a Portland cement mortar bed cured after a minimum of 20 hours, but does state that "...longer mortar bed cures up to 10 days are desirable." (ANSI A108.02; 4.2.2.1)

I recommend you cover your mud bed with polyethylene sheeting as soon as it's finished until you're ready to tile it.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 01-18-2019, 07:54 PM   #25
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Not at all sure why they'd say that, Wayne. If you find out, please do let us know.
Sounds like it could be quite the mystery

Thanks, bed covered. Unfortunately it was exposed for a 24 hours before I thought of it. I gave it a little misting before putting on the sheet.
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Old 01-19-2019, 10:47 AM   #26
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The ceramic tile industry considers a Portland cement mortar bed cured after a minimum of 20 hours, but does state that "...longer mortar bed cures up to 10 days are desirable." (ANSI A108.02; 4.2.2.1)
Does that mean Iím able to apply the Laticrete after a minimum of 20 hours?
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Old 01-19-2019, 10:56 AM   #27
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Yes, that's what it means. As it says, longer wait times are "desirable," though. I'll admit to having tiled over such mortar beds in less than the recommended 20 hours.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 01-19-2019, 02:21 PM   #28
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Don't forget that this is also dependent on ambient temperature. If you happen to keep your house at a consistent 90 deg., you'll be able to tile sooner. If you keep it frigid, then you'll have to wait longer.
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Old 01-19-2019, 03:50 PM   #29
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Wolfgang:
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If you happen to keep your house at a consistent 90 deg
It's been roughly 48 hours and I've decided to paint the ceiling and walls again so that will give me another few days. I'm giving the floor a light misting of water each day and recovering with the plastic. The inside temps are consistent at 72 F, outside temps -17

After I'm done painting I'll remove the plastic, let it dry for a day and apply the Laticrete, should be enough of time.

Thanks again for the help.
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Old 01-19-2019, 08:04 PM   #30
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Laticrete what, Wayne?
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