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Unread 09-12-2020, 07:57 PM   #16
cx
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Srikanth, you have said a couple times Hardy was installed. I'm guessing you mean Hardibacker Fiber/Cement Board. Would that be correct?

If so, I'm afraid there's more bad news. Hardiebacker is not approved for horizontal exterior applications at all, best I can recall. You might have your contractor show you the printed information he used to support his use of that material on your deck.

The reason I asked for your geographic location was to determine whether freeze/thaw was going to be an issue with that deck when it becomes saturated. Having lived in the DFW area for ten years or so, I know for sure you get some of that freeze/thaw action where you are and that's definitely gonna exacerbate the problems with your leaking deck.

As for the slope, it's easy enough to measure that for verification using nothing more complicated than a 4-foot level and a measuring tape.

I don't at all understand why he would use both RedGard and AquaDefense on your deck. He installed one over the other, or one some places and the other in other places, or..........? What was the thinking there?

And was any reason given for not properly flashing the deck against the building and posts?

Regardless the various waterproofing products used, fact is the deck is not properly waterproofed as evidenced by it already leaking. Has the contractor indicated what he intends to do to remedy the situation?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 09-12-2020, 08:08 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CX
Hardiebacker is not approved for horizontal exterior applications at all,
I'm not finding that anywhere in their installation instructions. Just specifics about the height, which he appears to meet, and the zone, which he's in.
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Unread 09-12-2020, 08:20 PM   #18
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Yes, they have height limitations for wall applications. Nowhere will it tell you how to install it on a floor outdoors.

When we usta have our own James Hardie rep here on the forums, he said there are no instructions for installing on horizontal surfaces outdoors on accounta it's just not an approved application. In any climate zone.

[Edit] I've sent an email through the James Hardie website asking if that were still the case and will report any response.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 09-14-2020, 03:40 PM   #19
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Quote:
Srikanth, you have said a couple times Hardy was installed. I'm guessing you mean Hardibacker Fiber/Cement Board. Would that be correct?
Thats correct. He used the same

Quote:
I don't at all understand why he would use both RedGard and AquaDefense on your deck. He installed one over the other, or one some places and the other in other places, or..........? What was the thinking there?
He used redgurad around the boundaries and post boundaries. Rest of the area is Aquadefence.

Guys, tell me. Is it possible that Tiles or grouts can leak? because yesterday I have tested by pouring water on tiles and not allowing water godown at edge. I see dripping the water bottom of the edge (ceiling edge). I am sure this. I stopped water going down and just staying on floor.

Tiles and grout doesn't have any gaps or cracks. How it is possible that water can get into under tiles?
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Unread 09-14-2020, 04:30 PM   #20
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Neither tile nor grout stop water. They will both absorb a small amount of water, but most of it goes right through unless gravity directs it elsewhere.
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Unread 09-14-2020, 04:31 PM   #21
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Srikanth, a ceramic tile installation is not waterproof. Yes, it can "leak." Water will pass through the grout joints in the tile installation.

Just how sure are you that your contractor actually covered the entire deck with a waterproofing membrane applied per the manufacturer's instructions? Not sounding like that was the case if water is leaking through the deck at places other than the perimeter and the railing penetrations. You perhaps have some in-progress photos showing this waterproofing layer?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 09-14-2020, 05:23 PM   #22
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New here, not a builder. Isn't the brick just a facing over a wood framing? With either air space or some sort of insulation behind it and held to framing with clips embedded in mortar joints? If so it would concern me that ledger board is only attached to the bricks. There have been numerous failures in last several years where decks have collapsed when they pulled away from house.
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Unread 09-14-2020, 06:03 PM   #23
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It's more vertical force than lateral force, so a brick wall should hold. For it to pull away from the house, the post would have to lean away from the ledger. Not impossible, but not likely, if everything is done properly.

Where I've seen them give way is when the anchors are substandard and pull out of the anchoring surface, or the ledger.
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Unread 09-14-2020, 07:04 PM   #24
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Were it a structural brick wall, Kevin, I might share your confidence, but with a brick veneer I would not be at all comfortable if the ledger were attached only to the brick. But I think we don't really know how the fastening was done and in Srikanth's position I'd be very concerned until I found out. Especially given the lack of care given the construction and waterproofing of the deck.

Welcome, Greg.

That deck attachment is one of the highest liability areas in residential construction to my thinking. Right up there with stairs and railings and wood-burning appliances.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 09-14-2020, 09:12 PM   #25
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But the City inspector checked all the structural before adding on the deck.
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Unread 09-14-2020, 09:15 PM   #26
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Srikanth, if the outer edge of the joists is really 8 1/2" then you only have about 2 3/4" of fall over the 16 feet which is not close to 1/4" per foot. 2x12 is typically 11 1/4".

Thanks for the welcome c.x.
As for flashing it looks like clapboards were replaced so maybe that area has flashing, but I would ask how it was addressed in brick areas.

Op said that ledger is installed with wedge anchors which seems to say it is attached only to brick. My understanding is brick veneer is only approved to hold it's own weight, not the weight of a deck and I think the window openings under the deck make it worse.
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Unread 09-14-2020, 10:22 PM   #27
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What you thinks this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TtSE...edialMembranes

It is a new balcony it is easy to do this.
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Unread 09-15-2020, 12:11 AM   #28
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Greg, I thought the same about the flashing initially, but on further inspection it appears to me to be a repair in that small area of wall rather than the removal of just the bottom section to allow for flashing. And nothing at all in the brick areas.

And I agree with the lack of proper slope and am further concerned that the joists were ripped down and not just sloped intact. End up with joists of unknown grade and inadequate depth for the span to accommodate a ceramic tile installation. Another serious problem.

Srikanth, That coating product might be something someone might look into as a last resort on an old, failing deck, but for a brand new deck that is improperly built and leaking from day one? No, I don't think that is an acceptable "repair" at all. You just paid for a new deck built to contemporary professional standards and it doesn't appear that's what you got. To now expect you to spend another $2500 to patch up your new, leaking, deck is not at all reasonable.

I can't find anything on that company's website to even indicate just what that product might be, but after application you will not have the ceramic tile surface you paid for, you'll have a painted surface of some sort that will certainly not hold up as well as the tile surface. And you'll note that all the critical areas, such as the wall/deck joints and the post/deck joints are just being patched with a flexible sealant. No way that's acceptable as your only waterproofing method in those areas with no proper flashing.

You've got a lot of issues there.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 09-15-2020, 10:57 AM   #29
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why tile your shower, you can just wallpaper it and use the paint on membrane!
https://www.remedialmembranes.com/tile-free-bathroom/

I support what CX said, but to address the product you found, it is a water based polyurethane. https://www.remedialmembranes.com/wp...mbrane-RV2.pdf

Also, it requires a proper slope and will not work with "ponding" issues: LIMITATIONS
Water Ponding: Remedial Membranes Clear Waterproofing
Membrane (CWM) is designed to be installed on top of
surfaces that have fall created in them to allow water run off.
If installed in situations with ponding, water surface may
blush until a time where it is able to dry.

Trafficability: CWM is tough and durable and can withstand
general foot traffic. However, as the membrane is flexible, it
can be damaged by point loads, heavy weights, sharps,
scuffing, dragging items across the surface and general
excessive abuse and should be protected against these. It is
not suitable for vehicular traffic

You can buy poly concrete sealant, BUT with any kind of foot traffic, and furniture, it will degrade in time, like a year time. Also, it is made in Australia. Who knows how stable it is in freeze/thaw environments. It doesn't say. I looked heavily into sealants for my outdoor concrete table. Poly is considered a wear surface that needs re-application periodically. It is just a topical membrane.

As to being UV stable outdoors, it does say this: Clear Waterproofing Membrane was initially developed for external use and is UV stable. As external surfaces tend to be much larger, Clear Waterproofing Membrane comes in both 1 & 2.6-gallon pails for your convenience. Disclaimer: although everyone can purchase the membrane, it is only warranted if the installation has been completed by an Accredited Installer who has completed the Remedial Membranes Training Program.

Rather than buying that stuff, you can find one locally: https://www.concretenetwork.com/prod...yurethane.html

See this for example: https://ultradt.com/all-products-sys...sealer-impact/

Note, how they specifically show maintenance applications are needed.
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