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Old 09-15-2018, 07:59 PM   #16
Davy
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When you nail your lath along the top, it's not going to hug the wall like you'll need for it to do. I would apply my scratch coat as thin as possible and then place some bricks or anything heavy against it along the bottom to push it back as much as you can. I have a feeling you'll be hurting for space.

Yep, I know the old school way, Charles. It was done that way before thinset was invented. The best thing to do is to do the mud work, let it set and then use thinset.
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Old 09-15-2018, 08:03 PM   #17
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Actually, the tiles weren't beat right into the wet mud, Pure was used first.
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Old 09-15-2018, 08:26 PM   #18
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Dave, the old mud sticks out about 1 1/8 inches or more past the blocking there is plenty of room in there as shown in the picture.
The wire lath that I put up will be the equivalent of putting up a piece of dura rock.

I thought of setting up screeds for a plumb coat of mortar over the scratch coat and then using thinset to set the tile but because of the variations in the wire lath scratch coat of the existing wall and that the max thickness of thin set should not exceed 3/16" I decided that it would be more accurate to do it the old fashion way.

setting the tile the old way is another area where the moisture content of the mortar is critical to bond. Its like laying brick, If the mortar is too dry you get a poor bond if the mortar is to wet it is too soft and makes it hard to set the tile. The best thing to do is to soak the tile as you would if you were laying brick so you can make a stiffer mortar and the mortar should have a good amount of lime in it.
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Old 09-15-2018, 08:41 PM   #19
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Looking at your pics, it's hard to tell the room you have. With 1 1/8, that'll be plenty room. Sounds like you have it figured out.
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:19 PM   #20
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The thing I have to get right is the deck mud!
I know there is a range between too dry and too wet. What are the consequences of having the mud too wet?
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:42 PM   #21
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this picture shows more clearly how thick the bedding mortar is all around
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Old 09-16-2018, 08:41 AM   #22
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I can clearly see the mud thickness on the outside. But, the mud thickness can vary from wall to wall inside the shower depending on how much mud was needed to plumb it up. Along the bottom, one wall might be 1 1/4 and the next 5/8. You never know until you check it.

I would still advise you to scratch coat the walls and let it set. Then apply the finish coat flush with the old mud. You can do this by embedding 2 short lattice sticks in the mud on each wall, making sure they are plumb. Make these sticks flush with the old mud. Once your finish coat is flat and plumb then let it set. Then use thinset.

The scratch coat needs to set up. It does no good to apply the finish coat over a fresh scratch. With it being 1 1/8 thick, you'll need a scratch coat, which is a good thing. The scratch will help set up your finish coat.
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Old 09-16-2018, 05:47 PM   #23
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Its pretty much the same thickness inside the shower. However the old tile is about 1/16 thicker then the new tile. thanks again for your advice
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