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Unread 03-13-2003, 09:26 PM   #1
healthyguy
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Tub/Tile Installation

Hi!

I am a new DIY just starting a tub/tile installation.

Tub and plumbing installed. Tub has a 3/4-inch lip.

Walls have 1/2" sheetrock. Want to use Hardibacker.

Initial Questions:

1. Is it recommended that 1/4" lathe be installed on top of all wall studs so that the CBU covers the tub lip? or do I forgt about the 1/4' lathe, install the CBU on top of each stud, to the top (but not cover) the tub lip?

2. Want to use 30-lb tar paper as my moisture barrier. Is this OK?

3. Should I cover all staples and tar paper seams with asphalt adhesive?

Thats it for now.

Thanks!

Kenny
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Unread 03-13-2003, 09:54 PM   #2
healthyguy
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I forgot to mention an important fact...

The walls in the bathroom are not square so the tub sits flat against the back wall but at least 1/8" away from the all on the left side and at least 1/4" away from the wall on the right side.

Kenny
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Unread 03-13-2003, 10:04 PM   #3
Cisco
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Kenny,

Just fir out the walls to get the CBU to extend far enough into the tub to accomodate the lip. Check with a scrape of cbu and a tile to make sure the tile will pass the lip and land on the tub then you can figure out how much to fir out each wall. Keep the CBU 1/8 or 1/4 off the tub lip and fill with silicone. You could use felt or poly behind the cbu no need to tar the seems (MB?) just over lap them.


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Unread 03-14-2003, 05:53 AM   #4
John Bridge
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Or . . . .

Stop the Backer Board right above the lip and let the tile carry down the rest of the way to the tub deck. Works for tiles four inch and larger.

Hi Kenny.
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Unread 03-14-2003, 09:56 AM   #5
healthyguy
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Cisco/John -

thanks for your input. Cisco...do you post on another forum?

yes...i have been reading the book on tile setting by MB.

my dilemma is the tub...since it doesn't sit square and flat against the wall studs. because of the gaps between the tub and the studs (which i cannot fix since the tub is already secured via plumbing), i will need to fir out at least 1/4". I priced 1/4" lathe at home depo and it costs around $.40/lf...can i use 1/4" plywood sheets?

Because of this (add it up, 1/4" lathe + 1/2" cbu = 3/4" tile/wall surface). Thats 1/4" higher than the current drywall. Because of this, I thought of removing the dry wall and doing this (1/4" lathe + 3/8" cbu = 5/8" tile/wall surface). Sounds like a lot of work but then the walls are flat...suggestions? Is 3/8" cbu enough?

so...based on both of your suggestions, i can install the cbu to the top of the tub lip and cover that gap with tile (leaving a 1/4" gap between the tub and the bottom edge of the tile)? thats means i need to really plan on installing a row of tiles above the tub greater than the height of the gap...right?

will that be water tight?

do i install the tar paper past the tub lip (per MB)?

what do i install underneath the tile that doesn't have cbu behind it? lot of chaulking or thinset?

thanks again!

kenny

PS a professional quote for this job is $2800 w/out materials
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Unread 03-14-2003, 10:14 AM   #6
phughes200
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Kenny,

You gotta love HD. I had the same problem. Look around HD. Ask and ask again. They sell bundles of lathe (app 1/4 thick) for shimming out walls. I forgot the cost but it is something loke $8 for 20-30 four foot pieces. It is crappy wood but that is what you need. Do not use the stuff piece by the foot unless you're rich. I would guess you could use plywood (I ended up using 5/8 plus 1/4 furring). If the furring strip give you the thickness you need i found it easier to work with than the plywood. The strips will also give you the ability to true up the studs.

Philip
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Unread 03-14-2003, 11:17 AM   #7
Scooter
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The redwood lathe is a buck for 4 feet. It is sold in bundles in the GARDEN area.
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Unread 03-14-2003, 11:47 AM   #8
bbcamp
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You can use anything (practically) to shim the studs. The plywood strips will work, if that's what you got. You can't plane the high spots, but you can sand them down, if that becomes necessary. A couple layers of tarpaper for thin shims works, too.

Use the 1/2" CBU. If you have to, rip out the drywall to the ceiling, shim the studs, then install new drywall. Will look better for your efforts. !/4" will flex too much, unless it is backed by something, or you install blocking at horizontal joints.

Carry the tar paper over the lip by 3/8" or so. Cover the tar paper with CBU. Set the tile to 1/4" off the tub deck. Tile will be strong enough without anything under it for the last 1/2" or so. Caulk the gap full of siliconized caulk. It will be waterproof enough.

Pocket the $2800 for a Carribean vacation.
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Unread 03-14-2003, 07:52 PM   #9
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But wait, Kenny, is it a steel tub? I mean, if the the flanges can be covered by the tile, why furr out? It's not uncommon for a tub to be away from the walls at the ends. The spaces are framed a little long so the tub can be man-handled in there.
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Unread 03-14-2003, 11:23 PM   #10
healthyguy
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Yes. It is a steel tub.

So from what you are suggesting...

1. Forget about furring the walls and install cbu and tar paper to the
top of the tub lip.

2. Tile over the tub lip leaving a 1/4" gap between the tile and tub.

3. Using silicon chaulking to fill gap between tub and tile.

Question:

1. Should I fill-in the gap between the cbu and tub with thinset of silicon chaukiing?

2. The seam between the cbu and drywall...

2a. fill gap will thinset or mud?

2b. use paper tape? mesh tape? special cbu tape?

Kenny
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Unread 03-15-2003, 07:01 AM   #11
Jason_Butler
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Mostly correct...

As long as the CBU is flush or slightly proud of the tub flange, you will be fine. The bottom of the tile will overlap the tub flange but will not be secured to the flange itself ; only the CBU above.

The joint between the CBU and the tub flange should be siliconed. The joint between the tile and the tub should be sealed as well ( not grouted) with silicone or a colored caulk of your choice.

Where the CBU and drywall meet, I use CBU tape and mud. To avoid the issue of " how do I paint / finish this joint", I extend the tile beyond the seam. This puts part of the tile on CBU and part on the drywall. Before the tile police come after me, let me say I try to place about 1" of the tile on the drywall ; the rest goes on the CBU . This has to be considered during the layout and the CBU install

Jason
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